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Summer Show

June 26–August 17, 2007
555 West 24th Street, New York

Tom Friedman, bigbluefigure, 2006 Styrofoam insulation, 42 × 168 × 55 ½ inches (106.7 × 426.7 × 141 cm)

Tom Friedman, bigbluefigure, 2006

Styrofoam insulation, 42 × 168 × 55 ½ inches (106.7 × 426.7 × 141 cm)

Damien Hirst, The Sun, The Moon and The Earth, 2007 Butterflies and household gloss paint on canvas, Triptych: 72 × 72 inches (182.9 × 182.9 cm); 72 × 72 inches (182.9 × 182.9 cm); 102 × 102 inches (259.1 × 259.1 cm)

Damien Hirst, The Sun, The Moon and The Earth, 2007

Butterflies and household gloss paint on canvas, Triptych: 72 × 72 inches (182.9 × 182.9 cm); 72 × 72 inches (182.9 × 182.9 cm); 102 × 102 inches (259.1 × 259.1 cm)

Mike Kelley, Farm Girl, 2006 Mixed media, 9 × 36 × 80 inches (22.9 × 91.4 × 203.2 cm)

Mike Kelley, Farm Girl, 2006

Mixed media, 9 × 36 × 80 inches (22.9 × 91.4 × 203.2 cm)

Jenny Saville, Suspension, 2002–03 Oil on canvas, 115 × 178 ⅜ × 3 ¼ inches (292.2 × 453.1 × 8.2 cm)

Jenny Saville, Suspension, 2002–03

Oil on canvas, 115 × 178 ⅜ × 3 ¼ inches (292.2 × 453.1 × 8.2 cm)

Alec Soth, Michele and James, 2005 Chromogenic print, 36 ¾ × 30 ⅞ inches framed (93.3 × 78.4 cm), edition of 10

Alec Soth, Michele and James, 2005

Chromogenic print, 36 ¾ × 30 ⅞ inches framed (93.3 × 78.4 cm), edition of 10

About

Gagosian is pleased to present Summer Show, a group exhibition featuring work by Tom Friedman, Douglas Gordon, Damien Hirst, Mike Kelley, Jenny Saville, Alec Soth, and Franz West, chosen for its emphasis on the physical form.

The expressionless pose of Tom Friedman’s bigbluefigure consciously recalls the conventions of classical sculpture. The exaggerated spatial proportions and almost fluid interchangeability of Styrofoam and marble mark an experimental approach to form and material that Friedman takes in many of his sculptural works.

Although sharing a similar affinity for the monumental, Jenny Saville’s paintings of grotesques exploit the organic qualities of paint that compose her semiabstract corporeal figures, in this instance a slaughtered pig. Marked by broad, messy brushstrokes, Suspension is firmly rooted in the physical world of blood and decay.

Damien Hirst’s triptych The Sun, The Moon and The Earth expands on his career-long preoccupation with life, death, and mortality. The work is part of an ongoing series of paintings in which Hirst’s use of real butterflies as a metaphor for nature and beauty symbolizes the precarious balance of life.

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