Menu

News / Events

In Conversation

Takashi Murakami
Stephen Little

Wednesday, February 20, 2019, 7:30–8:30pm
Bing Theater, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
www.lacma.org

Takashi Murakami will speak with Stephen Little, a curator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, about his work, including the upcoming exhibition Takashi Murakami: GYATEI² at Gagosian, Beverly Hills. LACMA director Michael Govan will introduce the conversation. To attend the free event, register at my.lacma.org.

Photo: Chika Okazumi

Photo: Chika Okazumi

Related News

Photo: Claire Dorn

Artist Spotlight

Takashi Murakami

December 9–15, 2020

Takashi Murakami seamlessly blends commercial imagery, anime, manga, and traditional Japanese styles and subjects, revealing the themes and questions that connect past and present, East and West, technology and fantasy. His paintings, sculptures, and films are populated by repeated motifs and evolving characters of his own creation. Together with dystopian themes and contemporary references, he revitalizes narratives of transcendence in continuation of the nonconformist legacy of a group of eighteenth-century Japanese artists known as the Edo eccentrics.

Photo: Claire Dorn

Takashi Murakami, Haha Bangla Manus, 2020, The Bloodstone Public Collection, installation view, Roppongi Hills, Tokyo © 2020 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved. Photo: RK

Public Installation

Takashi Murakami
Haha Bangla Manus

November 26, 2020–May 2021
Roppongi Hills, Tokyo
roppongihills.com

Takashi Murakami’s 10-meter-tall sculpture Haha Bangla Manus (2020) has been installed at 66 Plaza in Roppongi Hills, Tokyo. Cast in bronze and covered in gold leaf, the monumentally scaled sculpture—one of Murakami’s largest artworks to date—is decorated on all sides with the artist’s familiar flower motif, projecting diverse expressions of hope for the future. The project is a collaboration between the artist and Roppongi Hills; additional collaborations will be presented at various Roppongi Hills locations beginning in January 2021.

Takashi Murakami, Haha Bangla Manus, 2020, The Bloodstone Public Collection, installation view, Roppongi Hills, Tokyo © 2020 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved. Photo: RK

Takashi Murakami’s transformation of the CT/PET Scan Suite at the Children’s National Hospital, Washington, DC. Artwork © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. Photo: Kenson Noel

Design

Takashi Murakami
RxART

In collaboration with RxART, Takashi Murakami has transformed the CT/PET Scan Suite at the Children’s National Hospital in Washington, DC, by wrapping the walls and CT/PET scanner itself with a vibrant landscape featuring his signature smiling flowers. The installation has turned the once intimidating room—in which over 2,500 scans are performed each year—into an uplifting space, in an effort to alleviate the anxiety that many pediatric patients feel when they receive scans.

Takashi Murakami’s transformation of the CT/PET Scan Suite at the Children’s National Hospital, Washington, DC. Artwork © Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co. Ltd. All rights reserved. Photo: Kenson Noel

Albert Oehlen: In the Studio

Albert Oehlen: In the Studio

This film by Albert Oehlen, with music by Tim Berresheim, takes us inside the artist’s studio in Switzerland as he works on a new painting.

Gerhard Richter’s Helen (1963) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Spring 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2021

The Spring 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Gerhard Richter’s Helen (1963) on its cover.

Albert Oehlen and Mark Godfrey

In Conversation
Albert Oehlen and Mark Godfrey

Albert Oehlen speaks to Mark Godfrey about a recent group of abstract paintings, “academic” art, reversing habits, and questioning rules.

Gerhard Richter working on one of his Cage paintings, Cologne, Germany, 2006. Artwork © Gerhard Richter 2020 (05102020). Photo: © Hubert Becker

Gerhard Richter

Hans Ulrich Obrist traces the history behind Richter’s Cage paintings and speaks with the artist about their creation.

Setsuko in front of the Grand Chalet de Rossinière in Switzerland where she lives and works.

The Grand Chalet: An interview with Setsuko

On the twentieth anniversary of Balthus’s death, Setsuko gives an intimate tour of the Grand Chalet and reflects on how the 1754 Swiss mountain home enriched their lives as artists.

Adriana Varejão: In the Studio

Work in Progress
Adriana Varejão: In the Studio

Join Adriana Varejão at her studio in Rio de Janeiro as she prepares for her upcoming exhibition at Gagosian in New York. She speaks about the inspirations for her “tile” paintings, from Portuguese azulejos to the Brazilian Baroque to the Talavera ceramic tradition of Mexico, and reveals for the first time her unique process for creating these works.

Light blue title page with "Compass" in the center and white line radiating out.

Compass

A short story by Cleyvis Natera, published here on the occasion of the Quarterlys collaboration with pen America.

Francis Bacon in his studio in Battersea, London. Photo: © The Cecil Beaton Studio Archive at Sotheby’s

The Art of Biography: Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan

Mark Stevens and Annalyn Swan, coauthors of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize–winning biography of Willem de Kooning, speak with Michael Cary about the research and revelations that went into their forthcoming biography of Francis Bacon.

Ming Smith, Self-Portrait as Josephine, New York, 1986

On Ming Smith: A Life of Magical Thinking

An interview by Nicola Vassell.

David Adjaye (left). Photo: Chris Schwagga. Zoë Ryan (right). Photo: Clare Britt

In Conversation
Sir David Adjaye OBE and Zoë Ryan

Architect David Adjaye discusses his archival project Adjaye Africa Architecture: A Photographic Survey of Metropolitan Architecture with Zoë Ryan, Daniel W. Dietrich, II Director of the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania. For this decade-long project, published in seven volumes, Adjaye traveled to the capital city of every major African country to photograph the continent’s built environment.

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1990, acrylic, wax crayon, and pencil on handmade paper, 30 ⅝ × 21 ⅝ inches (77.8 × 54.8 cm)

Twombly and the Poets

Anne Boyer, the inaugural winner of the Cy Twombly Award in Poetry, composes a poem in response to TwomblyAristaeus Mourning the Loss of His Bees (1973) and introduces a portfolio of the painters works accompanied by the poems that inspired them.

Walter De Maria, The Lightning Field, 1977. Entire field from northwest exterior looking southeast, summer 1979

A Day in the Life of The Lightning Field

In the first of a two-part feature, John Elderfield recounts his experiences at The Lightning Field (1977), Walter De Maria’s legendary installation in New Mexico. Elderfield considers how this work requires our constantly finding and losing a sense of symmetry and order in shifting perceptions of space, scale, and distance, as the light changes throughout the day.