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Honor

Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread has been awarded a damehood in Queen Elizabeth II’s 2019 birthday honors list. The annual honors mark the reigning monarch’s official birthday by recognizing individuals whose outstanding and longterm achievements have contributed to the United Kingdom.

Rachel Whiteread with her sculpture Detached I (2012) at Gagosian, Britannia Street, London, 2013. Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Rachel Whiteread with her sculpture Detached I (2012) at Gagosian, Britannia Street, London, 2013. Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

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Rachel Whiteread, Shack I, 2014, permanent installation near Joshua Tree National Park, California © Rachel Whiteread

In Conversation

Rachel Whiteread
Iwona Blazwick

Thursday, January 24, 2019, 7pm
Whitechapel Gallery, London
www.whitechapelgallery.org

Rachel Whiteread will be in conversation with Whitechapel Gallery director Iwona Blazwick on the occasion of receiving the gallery’s annual Art Icon award for 2019. The pair will discuss the artist’s career and work, in which everyday settings, objects, and surfaces are transformed into ghostly replicas. To attend the event, purchase tickets at www.whitechapelgallery.org.

Rachel Whiteread, Shack I, 2014, permanent installation near Joshua Tree National Park, California © Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Shack I, 2014, permanent installation near Joshua Tree National Park, California © Rachel Whiteread

Award

Rachel Whiteread

The annual Art Icon award, created in 2014 and supported by Swarovski in conjunction with Whitechapel Gallery, London, celebrates the work of an artist who has made a profound contribution to a particular medium, influencing his or her own generation of artists and those that follow. This year Rachel Whiteread, known for her large-scale works and use of everyday materials, has been accorded this distinction: she will be presented with the award at the Whitechapel Gallery gala on Tuesday, January 29, 2019.

Rachel Whiteread, Shack I, 2014, permanent installation near Joshua Tree National Park, California © Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Nissen Hut, 2018 © Rachel Whiteread

Public Installation

Rachel Whiteread
Nissen Hut

Opening Wednesday, October 10, 2018
Dalby Forest, Yorkshire, England
www.forestryengland.uk

This sculpture by Rachel Whiteread is a concrete cast of a Nissen hut—a military structure invented during World War I—set in the middle of Dalby Forest in Yorkshire, England. Co-commissioned by 14-18 NOW and the British Forestry Commission, the sculpture is part of a series of events marking the centenary of the end of World War I.

Rachel Whiteread, Nissen Hut, 2018 © Rachel Whiteread

In the Studio: Damien Hirst’s Veil Paintings

In the Studio: Damien Hirst’s Veil Paintings

Damien Hirst speaks about his Veil paintings with Gagosian’s Alison McDonald. “I wanted to make paintings that were a celebration,” he says, “and that revealed something and obscured something at the same time.” 

Featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2020

The Summer 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

Damien Hirst, Fruit Salad, 2016, household gloss on canvas, 16 × 24 inches.

Damien Hirst: Colour Space Paintings

Blake Gopnik examines the artist’s “dot” paintings in relation to the history of representation in Western art, in which dabs of paint have served as fundamental units of depiction and markers of objective truth.

Damien Hirst, Happiness, 1993–94, oil on canvas, 24 × 17 ⅞ inches.

Damien Hirst: Visual Candy

James Fox considers the origins of Damien Hirst’s Visual Candy paintings on the occasion of a recent exhibition of these early works in Hong Kong.

Installation view of work by Rudolf Polanszky at Gagosian, 541 West 24th Street, New York, March 3–April 11, 2020.

Rudolf Polanszky: Reconstructions

Gagosian director Ealan Wingate describes his first visit to Rudolf Polansky’s studio outside Vienna and discusses the development of the artist’s practice—from his early works informed by the legacy of the Viennese Actionists to the Reconstructions, an ongoing body of assemblage-type wall works and sculptures.

Installation view, Urs Fischer: The Lyrical and the Prosaic, Aïshti Foundation, Beirut, October 20, 2019–October 31, 2020.

Urs Fischer: Lives of Forms

In his introduction to the catalogue for Urs Fischer’s exhibition The Lyrical and the Prosaic, at the Aïshti Foundation in Beirut, curator Massimiliano Gioni traces the material and conceptual tensions that reverberate throughout the artist’s paintings, sculptures, installations, and interventions.

Rainer Maria Rilke, 1928. Photo: Lou Andreas-Salomé

Rainer Maria Rilke: Duino Elegies

Bobbie Sheng explores the symbiotic relationship between the poet and visual artists of his time and tracks the enduring influence of his poetry on artists working today.

young people inside a tent structure within a purple-lit room

The Bigger Picture
Recess

Gagosian’s Sarah Hoover sat down with Allison Freedman Weisberg, founder and executive director of Recess, and Anaïs Duplan, Recess program manager, to discuss the community arts organization’s evolution, recent programs, and dreams for the future.

Installation view, Crushed, Cast, Constructed: Sculpture by John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, and Charles Ray, Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London, June 15–July 31, 2020

Uncanny Delights: Sculpture by John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, and Charles Ray

Catalyzed by the exhibition Crushed, Cast, Constructed: Sculpture by John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, and Charles Ray, Alice Godwin examines the legacy and development of a Surrealist ethos in selected works from three contemporary sculptors.

Mary Weatherford, Orion’s Belt, 2016, Flashe and neon on linen.

Mary Weatherford: Train Yards

Mary Weatherford speaks to Laura Hoptman about her new paintings, the Train Yard series. Begun in 2016, this body of work evokes the sights and sounds of railroads and night skies. The series will be shown for the first time in late 2020, in an exhibition at Gagosian, London.

Theaster Gates in his studio

Theaster Gates: Black Vessel

Join Theaster Gates in his studio as he prepares for his upcoming exhibition at Gagosian, New York, this fall. In this video, shot entirely on location in Chicago during the recent tumultuous weeks, Gates reflects on the metaphorical power of materials and process, and on the redemptive potential of art.

The inside of Theaster Gates’s Black Vessel for a Saint sculpture

How to Renew the Color of Bricks

Social historian Chris Dingwall reflects on Theaster Gates’s engagement with the history of quotidian materials, focusing on the symbolic qualities and function of his brick-based sculpture.