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Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Ghost, 1990 Plaster and steel frame, 269 × 355 ½ × 317 ½ inches (683.3 × 903 × 806.4 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Ghost, 1990

Plaster and steel frame, 269 × 355 ½ × 317 ½ inches (683.3 × 903 × 806.4 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Bath), 1990 Plaster and glass, 40 ⅝ × 82 ½ × 41 ½ inches (103 × 209.5 × 105.5 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Bath), 1990

Plaster and glass, 40 ⅝ × 82 ½ × 41 ½ inches (103 × 209.5 × 105.5 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Torso), c. 1992 Wax, 4 × 9 × 6 ½ inches (10.2 × 22.9 × 16.5 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Torso), c. 1992

Wax, 4 × 9 × 6 ½ inches (10.2 × 22.9 × 16.5 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Table), 1993 Resin, 27 ⅝ × 48 ¼ × 22 ¼ inches (70.2 × 122.3 × 56.5 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Table), 1993

Resin, 27 ⅝ × 48 ¼ × 22 ¼ inches (70.2 × 122.3 × 56.5 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Stairs, 1995 Correction fluid on paper, 11 ⅝ × 8 ⅜ inches (29.5 × 21 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Stairs, 1995

Correction fluid on paper, 11 ⅝ × 8 ⅜ inches (29.5 × 21 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Trafalgar Square Project, 1998 Photographic collage and acrylic on museum board, 19 ¾ × 12 ⅜ inches (50 × 31.5 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Trafalgar Square Project, 1998

Photographic collage and acrylic on museum board, 19 ¾ × 12 ⅜ inches (50 × 31.5 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Monument, 2001 Resin and granite, 354 ⅜ × 200 ⅞ × 94 ½ inches (900 × 510 × 240 cm), installed in Trafalgar Square, London© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Monument, 2001

Resin and granite, 354 ⅜ × 200 ⅞ × 94 ½ inches (900 × 510 × 240 cm), installed in Trafalgar Square, London
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (White), 2000–01 Steel and enamel, 8 ¼ × 6 ¼ × 6 ¼ inches (21 × 15.9 × 15.9 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (White), 2000–01

Steel and enamel, 8 ¼ × 6 ¼ × 6 ¼ inches (21 × 15.9 × 15.9 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (On/Off), 2001 Stainless steel, in 4 parts, each: 2 ⅝ × 2 ⅝× 1 1/16 inches (6.5 × 6.5 × 2.7 cm), edition of 6© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (On/Off), 2001

Stainless steel, in 4 parts, each: 2 ⅝ × 2 ⅝× 1 1/16 inches (6.5 × 6.5 × 2.7 cm), edition of 6
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, FOLDED, 2004 Plaster, 4 × 11 ½ × 15 ¼ inches (10.3 × 29 × 39 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, FOLDED, 2004

Plaster, 4 × 11 ½ × 15 ¼ inches (10.3 × 29 × 39 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Two Streets, 2007 Pencil and collage on paper, 22 ⅜ × 30 inches (56.7 × 76.3 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Two Streets, 2007

Pencil and collage on paper, 22 ⅜ × 30 inches (56.7 × 76.3 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, YELLOW EDGE, 2007–08 Plaster, pigment, and resin, in 4 parts, overall: 7 ¾ × 15 ¼ × 18 ½ inches (19.5 × 38.6 × 47 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, YELLOW EDGE, 2007–08

Plaster, pigment, and resin, in 4 parts, overall: 7 ¾ × 15 ¼ × 18 ½ inches (19.5 × 38.6 × 47 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, RED, BLACK, WHITE, 2008 Gouache, pencil, and collage on paper, 22 ½ × 30 inches (57 × 76 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, RED, BLACK, WHITE, 2008

Gouache, pencil, and collage on paper, 22 ½ × 30 inches (57 × 76 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, The Gran Boathouse, 2010 Concrete, installed in Røykenviken, Gran, Norway© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, The Gran Boathouse, 2010

Concrete, installed in Røykenviken, Gran, Norway
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, 50 Spaces, 2010 Gouache and pencil on graph paper, 23 ¼ × 33 ⅛ inches (59 × 84 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, 50 Spaces, 2010

Gouache and pencil on graph paper, 23 ¼ × 33 ⅛ inches (59 × 84 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Detached 1, 2012 Concrete and steel, 78 ¾ × 67 ¾ × 43 inches (200 × 172 × 109 cm)© Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Mike Bruce

Rachel Whiteread, Detached 1, 2012

Concrete and steel, 78 ¾ × 67 ¾ × 43 inches (200 × 172 × 109 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Mike Bruce

Rachel Whiteread, Tree of Life, 2012 Bronze, permanent installation at Whitechapel Gallery, London© Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Michael Bowles/REX/Shutterstock

Rachel Whiteread, Tree of Life, 2012

Bronze, permanent installation at Whitechapel Gallery, London
© Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Michael Bowles/REX/Shutterstock

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 2013 Resin, in 2 parts, overall: 38 ⅝ × 18 ⅞ × 3 inches (98 × 48 × 7.5 cm)© Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Mike Bruce

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 2013

Resin, in 2 parts, overall: 38 ⅝ × 18 ⅞ × 3 inches (98 × 48 × 7.5 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Mike Bruce

Rachel Whiteread, US Embassy (Flat pack house), 2013–15 Concrete, installed at the US Embassy, LondonArtwork © Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Mike Bruce

Rachel Whiteread, US Embassy (Flat pack house), 2013–15

Concrete, installed at the US Embassy, London
Artwork © Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Mike Bruce

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 2017 Resin, 19 ¾ × 19 ⅜ × 2 inches (50 × 49 × 5 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 2017

Resin, 19 ¾ × 19 ⅜ × 2 inches (50 × 49 × 5 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

About

Seeing a great piece of art can take you from one place to another—it can enhance daily life, reflect our times and, in that sense, change the way you think and are.
—Rachel Whiteread

In Rachel Whiteread’s sculptures and drawings, everyday settings, objects, and surfaces are transformed into ghostly replicas that are eerily familiar. Through casting, she frees her subject matter—from beds, tables, and boxes to water towers and entire houses—from practical use, suggesting a new permanence, imbued with memory.

During her childhood in London, Whiteread’s parents’ interests in art and architecture made an enormous impact on her understanding of form and material. Her father’s fascination with urban architecture “enabled [her] to look up,” and her mother’s artistic practice allowed her to see the intersection of home and studio, life and art. Whiteread fondly remembers helping her father lay a concrete floor in their basement to convert it into a studio. The processes of looking, emptying, and filling run throughout her work, revealing how the surfaces of daily life can disappear and reappear, bearing the traces of their previous lives.

Whiteread studied painting at Brighton Polytechnic and sculpture at the Slade School of Fine Art in the 1980s. In 1988 she had her first solo exhibition, at the Carlisle Gallery in London, which included the sculptures Shallow Breath (1988), cast from the underside of a divan, and Torso (1988), the first in a series of cast hot water bottles. The Torso sculptures (1988–) are notably the only works in her oeuvre that make direct anthropomorphic reference. This exhibition marked the beginning of Whiteread’s use of domestic items; in these early pieces, she often left remnants of the original objects—such as scraps of wood—embedded into the cast forms.

Ghost (1990) was Whiteread’s first large-scale sculpture and set in motion the ambitious, architecturally scaled works for which she is widely recognized today. Made by filling a room of a Victorian house in North London with concrete to create a solid cast that picks up the details of the walls, mantle, and windows, Ghost is a positive room-sized object that reveals itself gradually, as one encircles the huge form. Whiteread expanded on this working method in House (1993; destroyed 1994), cast from an entire Victorian terrace house. Whiteread created this work after all the other terraces in the row had been demolished, and it stood alone as a reminder of the working-class homes that once spanned the street. The sculpture sparked heated debates around issues of real estate, class divisions, and urban sprawl.

Whiteread’s first public commission in New York, Water Tower (1998), was cast from one of the city’s distinctive rooftop water towers in clear resin. “On a cloudy, gray day,” Whiteread explained, “it might just completely disappear. And on a really bright blue-sky day, it will ignite.” This ethereal presence contrasts with the weight of her Holocaust Memorial (2000), permanently installed in Vienna. Dedicated to the 65,000 Austrian Jews murdered during the Holocaust, the sculpture resembles, in the words of James Lawrence, “a private library turned inside out,” each wall lined with rows of nameless books, with two permanently closed doors on the front. In 2018 Whiteread’s US Embassy (Flat pack house) (2013–15) was unveiled at the United States Embassy in London, where the cast sections of an average 1950s suburban American house, arranged as separate geometric planes on a wall, greet visitors as they enter through the consular court.

Rachel Whiteread

Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

From the Quarterly

Fairs, Events & Announcements

William Forsythe, Lectures from Improvisation Technologies, 2011, performed by William Forsythe © William Forsythe

Book Fair

NY Art Book Fair
William Forsythe

September 21–23, 2018, project space room, booth S202
MoMA PS1, New York
www.nyartbookfair.com

Gagosian is participating in the NY Art Book Fair 2018 with a special project space conceived in collaboration with choreographer William Forsythe, exploring visual and notational approaches to dance and movement. Forsythe is a radical innovator in choreography and dance who has redefined the very syntax and praxis of his field. In the course of his singular career spanning five decades, he has developed an extensive repertoire of groundbreaking ballet choreographies and experimental, non-proscenium-based dance-theater works, as well as an open-access digital platform for dance analysis, notation, and improvisation.

At the NYABF, printed materials and videos by Forsythe are featured alongside selected Gagosian publications, as well as additional books and ephemera that reveal Forsythe’s wide-ranging influences and interests including Chris Burden, Katharina Grosse, Richard Serra, Cy Twombly, and Rachel Whiteread.

William Forsythe, Lectures from Improvisation Technologies, 2011, performed by William Forsythe © William Forsythe

Taryn Simon, Professional Mourners, 2018 © Taryn Simon

Auction

Artists for Artangel

Live auction: June 28, 2018
Banqueting House, London

Online auction: June 7–28, 2018
paddle8.com

Exhibition: June 8–27, 2018
Cork Street Galleries, London

Artists for Artangel is a special auction to benefit Artangel’s ambitious projects in contemporary art. For over thirty years, Artangel has worked with artists to produce extraordinary artworks of public import in unexpected places. Commissions by gallery artists include Rachel Whiteread’s House (1993), a negative concrete cast of a condemned terrace house in Bow, London; Douglas Gordon’s Feature Film (1998); and most recently, Taryn Simon’s highly acclaimed performance on the culture of mourning, An Occupation of Loss (2016 and 2018), presented in an astonishing underground location in Islington, London. For information on works in the auction or how to bid, go to www.artangel.org.uk.


Taryn Simon, Professional Mourners, 2018 © Taryn Simon

Giuseppe Penone, Pelle di foglie—5 foglie a terra, 2011 © Giuseppe Penone

Art Fair

artgenève 2018

February 1–4, 2018, booth B19
Palexpo, Geneva
www.artgeneve.ch

Gagosian is pleased to participate in artgenève 2018, presenting a selection of works by Richard Artschwager, Georg Baselitz, John Currin, Dadamaino, Edmund de Waal, Keith Haring, Damien Hirst, Peter Lindbergh, Vera Lutter, Man Ray, Sally Mann, Brice Marden, Olivier Mosset, Albert Oehlen, Steven Parrino, Giuseppe Penone, Sigmar Polke, Ed Ruscha, Blair Thurman, Tatiana Trouvé, Tom Wesselmann, Franz West, Rachel Whiteread, and others. If you wish to receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact us at geneva@gagosian.com. Tickets are available at www.artgeneve.ch.

Giuseppe Penone, Pelle di foglie—5 foglie a terra, 2011 © Giuseppe Penone

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Museum Exhibitions

Rachel Whiteread, Line Up, 2007–08 © Rachel Whiteread

On View

Rachel Whiteread

Through January 13, 2019
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
www.nga.gov

This momentous show is the most comprehensive exhibition to date of Rachel Whiteread’s career. It brings together well-known works such as Untitled (Stairs) (2001) alongside new pieces that have never been previously exhibited. Special sections are devoted to the artist’s archival materials and to her drawings. This exhibition has traveled from Tate Britain in London and Belvedere 21 in Vienna.

Rachel Whiteread, Line Up, 2007–08 © Rachel Whiteread

Jeff Koons, New Shop-Vac Wet/Dry, 1980 © Jeff Koons

Opening Soon

Elephant in the Room
Sculptures of the Marx Collection and the Collection of the Nationalgalerie

November 1, 2018–October 20, 2019
www.smb.museum

Elephant in the Room—Sculptures of the Marx Collection and the Collection of the Nationalgalerie explores the relationship between artwork and spatiality. Based on the phrase “the elephant in the room,” the elephant named in the exhibition title is those forces and sizes that, although not part of the sculptures, have a decisive influence on their presence in space and are thus an integral part of the expanded concept of art of the 1960s.Work by Jeff Koons and Rachel Whiteread is included.

Jeff Koons, New Shop-Vac Wet/Dry, 1980 © Jeff Koons

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Stairs), 2001 © Rachel Whiteread

Closed

Rachel Whiteread

March 7–July 29, 2018
Belvedere 21, Vienna
www.21erhaus.at

This momentous show is the most comprehensive exhibition to date of Rachel Whiteread’s career. It brings together well-known works such as Untitled (Stairs) (2001) alongside new pieces that have never been previously exhibited. Special sections are devoted to the artist’s archival materials and to her drawings. This exhibition has traveled from the Tate Britain.

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Stairs), 2001 © Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 1993 © Rachel Whiteread

Closed

The Sculptor’s Drawings

April 20–July 12, 2018
Museo Novecento, Florence, Italy
www.museonovecento.it

Drawing, as the initial and essential visual definition of an idea, has since antiquity played a fundamental role in the field of artistic creation. The Sculptor’s Drawings will highlight the connection between the graphic medium and the realization of sculpture and installation art. Work by Henry Moore and Rachel Whiteread will be included.

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled, 1993 © Rachel Whiteread

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Press

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