Menu

Gagosian Quarterly

January 22, 2018

Katharina Grosseat Carriageworks

Katharina Grosse’s much-anticipated installation The Horse Trotted Another Couple of Metres, Then It Stopped recently opened the Sydney Festival at Carriageworks, the cutting-edge center for the performing and contemporary arts in Australia.

This vast and exciting painting—more than 8,250 square meters of folded and draped fabric, suspended from the ceiling, into which the public can freely enter and move around—marks a bold direction in Grosse’s in situ practice. Working directly on-site in Sydney with a team that included local theater technicians as well as members of her own Berlin studio, she has created an immersive installation of unprecedented opulence in terms of its sheer range of color, elaborate contouring, and charged atmosphere.

Carriageworks has created a series of video-interviews with Grosse, including the one here, in which she tells the mythical tale of a knight, his horse, and the search for the meaning of life. Drawn from her childhood memories of the stories her father told her, this anecdote sheds intriguing new light on Grosse’s typically enigmatic titles. To learn more, visit www.carriageworks.com.

Katharina Grosse film courtesy of Carriageworks, Australia. The Horse Trotted Another Couple of Metres, Then It Stopped is on view at Carriageworks, Sydney, Australia through Sunday, April 8, 2018

David Reed, #714, 2014–19, acrylic, oil, and alkyd on polyester.

David Reed

David Reed and Katharina Grosse met at Reed’s New York studio in the fall of 2019 to talk about his newest paintings, the temporal aspects of both artists’ practice, and some of their mutual inspirations.

Installation view, "Katharina Grosse: Is It You?," Baltimore Museum of Art, March 1–June 28, 2020.

Katharina Grosse: The Movement Comes from Outside

Katharina Grosse discusses her exhibition Is It You? at the Baltimore Museum of Art with Gagosian’s Jona Lueddeckens. They consider what sets the Baltimore installation apart from its predecessors, and how Grosse sees the relationship of the human body to her immersive environments as opposed to her canvases.

Installation view, Katharina Grosse: Is It You?, Baltimore Museum of Art, March 1, 2020–January 3, 2021.

Katharina Grosse: I see what she did there

On the occasion of the artist’s exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Terry R. Myers muses on the manipulations of time in Grosse’s work.

Featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2020

The Summer 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

The cover of the Spring 2020 edition of the Gagosian Quarterly magazine. A Cindy Sherman photograph of herself dressed as a clown against a rainbow background.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2020

The Spring 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Cindy Sherman’s Untitled #412 (2003) on its cover.

Katharina Grosse: Mumbling Mud

Katharina Grosse: Mumbling Mud

We take a visual tour through Katharina Grosse’s Mumbling Mud and the installation process behind it as the artist discusses the effects of the work’s merging of built and painted space.

Trouvé and Grosse: Villa Medici

Trouvé and Grosse: Villa Medici

Tatiana Trouvé and Katharina Grosse discuss their exhibition Le numerose irregolarità, at the French Academy in Rome, Villa Medici, with curator Chiara Parisi.

Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2018

Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2018

The Spring 2018 Gagosian Quarterly with a cover by Ed Ruscha is now available for order.

C.T.S.T.

C.T.S.T.

Katharina Grosse reflects on the work of Cy Twombly.

Katharina Grosse

Katharina Grosse

An interview between Katharina Grosse and Louise Neri. The two discuss Grosse’s process and examine the countless perceptual possibilities of her medium.

Mike Milken and Larry Gagosian

In Conversation
Mike Milken and Larry Gagosian

Mike Milken interviews Larry Gagosian about their shared histories, the important role of art in moments of crisis, and the long-term impact of creative visions.

Georg Baselitz, Ohne Titel (nach Pontormo) (Untitled [after Pontormo]), 1961.

Baselitz Bildung

On the occasion of a career-spanning exhibition at the Gallerie dell’Accademia, Venice, Richard Calvocoressi tracks the evolution of Georg Baselitz’s development from his early education in East Germany to his revelatory trip to Florence, in 1965, and beyond.