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Bruce Nauman

Bruce Nauman, One Hundred Fish Fountain, 2005 Ninety-seven bronze fish of seven different forms, suspended with stainless steel wire from a metal grid, Installation: 300 × 336 inches (762 × 853.4 cm)

Bruce Nauman, One Hundred Fish Fountain, 2005

Ninety-seven bronze fish of seven different forms, suspended with stainless steel wire from a metal grid, Installation: 300 × 336 inches (762 × 853.4 cm)

Bruce Nauman, Animal Pyramid, 1989 Polyurethane foam, iron, wood, and wire, 144 × 84 × 96 inches (366 × 213 × 244 cm)© 2015 Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Bruce Nauman, Animal Pyramid, 1989

Polyurethane foam, iron, wood, and wire, 144 × 84 × 96 inches (366 × 213 × 244 cm)
© 2015 Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

About

Since the 1960s, Bruce Nauman's radical interdisciplinary approach has challenged conventions while producing new methodologies for creating art and meaning. His rigorous, ascetic engagement with the existential dichotomies of life/death, love/hate, pleasure/pain has embraced performance, video, holography, installation, sculpture, and drawing. From the attitudes and forms of his Post–Minimalist and Conceptual work to his most recent sound installations, persistent themes and ideas appear: the use of the body as material; the relationship between image and language, art and viewer; and the generative interaction of positive and negative space.

Bruce Nauman was born in 1941 in Fort Wayne, Indiana. He received his B.S. in 1964 from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and his M.F.A. in 1966 from the University of California, Davis. From 1966 to 1968, he taught at San Francisco Art Institute, California, and in 1970 he taught at University of California, Irvine. Recent solo exhibitions include “Mapping The Studio: Bruce Nauman Video Works,” National Gallery of Victoria International, Melbourne (2005); “Pay Attention: Bruce Nauman Videos from the Collection of Barbara Balkin Cottle and Robert Cottle,” Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Arizona (2005); Bündner Kunstmuseum Chur, Switzerland (2005); Milwaukee Art Museum, Wisconsin (2006, traveled to Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indiana; Museum of Contemporary Art, Florida; Henry Art Gallery, University of Washington, Seattle; Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, California; Musee d’Art Contemporain, Montreal, Canada; Australian Center for Contemporary Art, Melbourne; and Queensland Art Gallery, Australia, through 2008); Tate Liverpool, England (2006, traveled to Museo d'Arte Donna Regina, Italy); University of California, Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive, California (2007, traveled to Castello di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Italy; and The Menil Collection, Houston); Centre d'Art la Panera, Colombia (2008); Museu de Arte Contemporanea, Portugal (2008); Centre for Contemporary Art Ujazdowski Castle, Poland (2009); Philadelphia Museum of Art, Pennsylvania (2009); Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, Michigan (2009); Center for Contemporary Art, Japan (2010); Musée d'Art Contemporain Lyon, France (2010); The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2010); Hamburger Bahnhof, Museum für Gegenwart, Berlin (2010); Neues Museum Weserburg Bremen, Germany (2010); Institute of Contemporary Arts, London (2012); Göteburgs Konstmuseum (Gothenburg Museum of Art), Sweden (2013); Institut Valencia d’Art Modern, Spain (2015); Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris (2015); and Skulpturenpark Waldfrieden (Waldfrieden Sculpture Park), Germany (2015).

Nauman currently lives and works in Galisteo, New Mexico.

Museum Exhibitions

Bruce Nauman, Mold for a Modernized Slant Step, 1966, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago © 2018 Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

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West by Midwest

November 17, 2018–January 27, 2019
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
mcachicago.org

West by Midwest tells a story that illuminates the ways that contemporary art practices spread and develop by tracing the intersecting lives of artists who have migrated from the American Midwest to the West Coast since the mid-twentieth century. Lured by career opportunities, warmer weather, and the prospect of a better life promised by the postwar boom, those artists who were able to migrate attended art schools together, shared studios, exhibited work in the same galleries, collaborated on projects, engaged in activism, and dated one another. Work by Mike Kelley, Bruce Nauman, Sterling Ruby, and Ed Ruscha is included.

Bruce Nauman, Mold for a Modernized Slant Step, 1966, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago © 2018 Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

Roy Lichtenstein, Temple, 1964 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

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The Classical Now

March 2–April 28, 2018
King’s College, London
www.kcl.ac.uk

The Classical Now pairs the work of modern and contemporary artists with classical Greek and Roman antiquities. The exhibition traces the ways in which Greco-Roman art has captured and permeated modern imagination, while exploring the myriad continuities and contrasts between the ancient, modern, and contemporary, revealing the “classical” as a living and fluid tradition. Work by Michael Craig-Martin, Damien Hirst, Alex Israel, Yves Klein, Roy Lichtenstein, Henry Moore, Bruce Nauman, Pablo Picasso, and Rachel Whiteread is included.

Roy Lichtenstein, Temple, 1964 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Jeff Koons, Rabbit, 1986 © Jeff Koons.Photo by Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

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We Are Here

August 19, 2017–April 1, 2018
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
mcachicago.org

In honor of the Museum of Contemporary Art’s fiftieth anniversary, the museum presents We Are Here, a three-part exhibition drawn from its collection. I Am You gathers works that question how we relate to and shape our environments; You Are Here examines how the role of the viewer has changed over time; and We Are Everywhere showcases artists who borrow from popular culture. Work by Richard Artschwager, Francis Bacon, Chris Burden, Ellen Gallagher, Andreas Gursky, Michael Heizer, Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Takashi Murakami, Bruce Nauman, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Rudolf Stingel, Andy Warhol, and Franz West is included.

Jeff Koons, Rabbit, 1986 © Jeff Koons.
Photo by Nathan Keay © MCA Chicago

Douglas Gordon, going out, 2005 © Studio lost but found and VG Bild-Kunst 2018. Photo by Axel Schneider

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I Am a Problem

September 23, 2017–February 18, 2018
MMK 2, Frankfurt
mmk-frankfurt.de

A gloomy and at the same time provoking parallel world unfolds in the exhibition space, in which works from the Museum für Moderne Kunst’s collection become protagonists of a narrative and enter into a dialogue with one another. The starting point for the staging is a myth about Maria Callas (1923–1977). Work by Douglas Gordon, Bruce Nauman, Steven Parrino, Taryn Simon, and Andy Warhol is included.

Douglas Gordon, going out, 2005 © Studio lost but found and VG Bild-Kunst 2018. Photo by Axel Schneider

See all Museum Exhibitions for Bruce Nauman