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Extended through September 17, 2016

Plane.Site

May 18–September 17, 2016
San Francisco

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Rachel Whiteread, © Joe Bradley, © Richard Serra

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Rachel Whiteread, © Joe Bradley, © Richard Serra

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein, © Robert Therrien

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein, © Robert Therrien

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, © Cy Twombly Foundation

Works Exhibited

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Deco Pink and Lemon Yellow Butterfly 45.95), 2016 Colored pencil on paper, 55 × 42 inches (139.7 × 106.7 cm)© Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Deco Pink and Lemon Yellow Butterfly 45.95), 2016

Colored pencil on paper, 55 × 42 inches (139.7 × 106.7 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Yellow Walkaway Mask M32.b), 2015–16 Painted bronze, 59 ⅜ × 24 ½ × 37 ½ inches (150.8 × 62.2 × 95.3 cm), unique variant© Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Yellow Walkaway Mask M32.b), 2015–16

Painted bronze, 59 ⅜ × 24 ½ × 37 ½ inches (150.8 × 62.2 × 95.3 cm), unique variant
© Mark Grotjahn. Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Roy Lichtenstein, Mobile III (Study), 1990 Tape and painted and printed paper on board, 80 ½ × 60 inches (204.6 × 152.4 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Mobile III (Study), 1990

Tape and painted and printed paper on board, 80 ½ × 60 inches (204.6 × 152.4 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Mobile III, 1990 Painted and patinated bronze, 57 × 52 × 13 inches (144.8 × 132.1 × 33 cm), edition of 6© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. Photo: Rob McKeever

Roy Lichtenstein, Mobile III, 1990

Painted and patinated bronze, 57 × 52 × 13 inches (144.8 × 132.1 × 33 cm), edition of 6
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2003 Acrylic, oil, and wax crayon on handmade paper, 39 ⅜ × 23 ⅝ inches (100 × 60 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2003

Acrylic, oil, and wax crayon on handmade paper, 39 ⅜ × 23 ⅝ inches (100 × 60 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Lexington), 2009 Wood, white paint, cardboard, yellow acrylic, and plastic string, 21 × 12 × 9 ½ inches (53.3 × 30.5 × 24.1 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Lexington), 2009

Wood, white paint, cardboard, yellow acrylic, and plastic string, 21 × 12 × 9 ½ inches (53.3 × 30.5 × 24.1 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Rachel Whiteread, 50 Spaces, 2010 Gouache and pencil on graph paper, 23 ¼ × 33 ⅛ inches (59 × 84 cm)© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, 50 Spaces, 2010

Gouache and pencil on graph paper, 23 ¼ × 33 ⅛ inches (59 × 84 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, YELLOW EDGE, 2007–08 Plaster, pigment, and resin, in 4 parts, 7 ⅝ × 15 ¼ × 18 ½ inches (19.5 × 38.6 × 47 cm)© Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Mike Bruce

Rachel Whiteread, YELLOW EDGE, 2007–08

Plaster, pigment, and resin, in 4 parts, 7 ⅝ × 15 ¼ × 18 ½ inches (19.5 × 38.6 × 47 cm)
© Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Mike Bruce

About

The critic and curator Philip Rawson, an eloquent guide to the means and methods of drawing over the ages, points out that until the Italian Quattrocento, no European sculptor was supposed to be able to draw. In the medieval period, only those sculptors who also worked in two dimensions drew habitually; any other sculptor who needed, say, to show a client a proposed design hired a draftsman to make one. And when sculptors began to make drawings (for their own use or to guide assistants), they tended to do so without thinking of the format of the paper as a frame to which the image should relate. Instead, the image was generally treated as an independent motif, composed of mutually related units and placed anywhere on the sheet. In this approach, the space of the paper outside the image was not incorporated into the design but functioned like the open, empty space around actual sculptures. . . . In contrast, Rawson observes, painters’ drawings have tended to treat the usually rectangular format of the paper as a frame to which the image content relates.
—John Elderfield

Gagosianis pleased to present Plane.Site, a cross-generational exhibition of modern and contemporary artists organized by Sam Orlofsky to inaugurate the San Francisco gallery.

Plane.Site explores the dynamic exchanges between drawing and sculpture in the work of artists from the postwar period to the present day. To that end, each participating artist is represented by works in both two and three dimensions.

In an essay accompanying the exhibition, John Elderfield observes that “Moving from the boundaries of two dimensions into free space, artists may feel an obvious thrill of escape,” while noting that there is also “the less obvious but equally liberating escape from open space, with its grip of the literal, for the spontaneity of movement and freedom of illusion attainable in the haven of the two-dimensional.” Consistent with his observation, many modern and contemporary artists have evaded the dictate of the rectangular frame, allowing the drawn line to exist on different planes, and eventually, to descend from the canvas into three dimensions. In stepping away from the drawn line on paper and into the heft and mass of three-dimensional sculpture, such artists continued to negotiate the rectangular plane, even when composing in open space.

Read more

Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2019

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2019

The Summer 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Afrylic by Ellen Gallagher on its cover.

Left: Sally Mann, Self-Portrait, 1974; right: Jenny Saville in her studio, c. 1990s.

Sally Mann and Jenny Saville

The two artists discuss being drawn to difficult subjects, the effects of motherhood on their practice, embracing chance, and their shared adoration of Cy Twombly.

Glenstone Museum.

Intimate Grandeur: Glenstone Museum

Paul Goldberger tracks the evolution of Mitchell and Emily Rales’s Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. Set amid 230 acres of pristine landscape and housing a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art, this graceful complex of pavilions, designed by architects Thomas Phifer and Partners, opened to the public in the fall of 2018.

Rachel Whiteread, Nissen Hut, 2018.

Shy Sculpture: Nissen Hut

Rachel Whiteread’s public sculpture Nissen Hut was unveiled in October 2018 in Yorkshire’s Dalby Forest. Curator Tamsin Dillon explores the dynamic history of these structures and provides a firsthand account of the steps leading up to the work’s premiere.

Giuseppe Penone, Leaves of Light – Tree, 2016, installed at the Louvre Abu Dhabi.

Rain of Light

One year after the opening of the Louvre Abu Dhabi, Jean Nouvel and Giuseppe Penone sat down with Alain Fleischer, Pepi Marchetti Franchi, and Hala Wardé to reflect on how the museum and Penone’s commissioned artworks for the space came to be.

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Notre-Dame), 2019.

For Notre-Dame

An exhibition at Gagosian, Paris, is raising funds to aid in the reconstruction of the Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris following the devastating fire of April 2019. Gagosian directors Serena Cattaneo Adorno and Jean-Olivier Després spoke to Jennifer Knox White about the generous response of artists and others, and what the restoration of this iconic structure means across the world.