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Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 1986 Oil on canvas, 71 × 86 ¾ inches (180.3 × 220.3 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 1986

Oil on canvas, 71 × 86 ¾ inches (180.3 × 220.3 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled (Instructions), 1990 Photograph, 59 ⅛ × 78 ¾ inches (150 × 200 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled (Instructions), 1990

Photograph, 59 ⅛ × 78 ¾ inches (150 × 200 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 1994 Pigmented cast polyurethane rubber compound, 13 ⅜ × 10 ¼ × 1 ⅝ inches (34 × 26 × 4 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 1994

Pigmented cast polyurethane rubber compound, 13 ⅜ × 10 ¼ × 1 ⅝ inches (34 × 26 × 4 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 1999 Styrofoam, 94 ¼ × 96 ⅛ inches (239.4 × 244 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 1999

Styrofoam, 94 ¼ × 96 ⅛ inches (239.4 × 244 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2000 Styrofoam, 96 × 192 × 4 inches (243.8 × 487.7 × 10.2 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2000

Styrofoam, 96 × 192 × 4 inches (243.8 × 487.7 × 10.2 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002 Celotex insulation board, wood, and aluminum, 95 × 92 ¾ inches (241.3 × 235.6 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002

Celotex insulation board, wood, and aluminum, 95 × 92 ¾ inches (241.3 × 235.6 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Installation view, Rudolf Stingel, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, January 27–May 27, 2007 © Rudolf Stingel

Installation view, Rudolf Stingel, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, January 27–May 27, 2007

© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2008 Oil and enamel on linen, 83 × 67 inches (210.8 × 170.2 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2008

Oil and enamel on linen, 83 × 67 inches (210.8 × 170.2 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2010 Oil and enamel on canvas, 130 × 185 inches (330 × 470 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2010

Oil and enamel on canvas, 130 × 185 inches (330 × 470 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2010 Oil on canvas, 131 × 102 inches (333 × 259 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2010

Oil on canvas, 131 × 102 inches (333 × 259 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2010 Oil on canvas, 132 × 180 ¾ inches (335.3 × 459.1 cm), Broad, Los Angeles© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2010

Oil on canvas, 132 × 180 ¾ inches (335.3 × 459.1 cm), Broad, Los Angeles
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2012 Oil and enamel on canvas, 95 × 76 inches (241.3 × 193 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2012

Oil and enamel on canvas, 95 × 76 inches (241.3 × 193 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2015 Oil and enamel on canvas, 95 × 76 inches (241.3 × 193 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2015

Oil and enamel on canvas, 95 × 76 inches (241.3 × 193 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2016 Electroformed copper, plated nickel, and stainless steel, 47 ¼ × 47 ¼ inches (120 × 120 cm)© Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2016

Electroformed copper, plated nickel, and stainless steel, 47 ¼ × 47 ¼ inches (120 × 120 cm)
© Rudolf Stingel

About

I wouldn’t know where to say intervention stops and destruction begins. 
—Rudolf Stingel

From his captivatingly realistic oil paintings to his innovative use of Celotex, Styrofoam, carpet, and aluminum, Rudolf Stingel challenges traditional notions of what constitutes a painting. Often dealing with subjects of time, memory, and perception, he embraces industrial materials and ornamental design as vehicles for formal exploration and provoked coincidence, whereby the final state of certain installations is determined by the participation of the viewer.

Born in Merano, Italy, Stingel grew up in the Tyrolean Alps, a mountainous region where Austria, Italy, and Switzerland meet. In 1989, he completed Instructions, a limited-edition manual explaining (in several languages) how to make one of his silver paintings, abstract canvases with undertones of red, yellow, or blue. In his screenprints of these years, Stingel created impressions using folded and creased tulle, then sprayed over the compositions with silver spray paint.

In 1991, Stingel installed a bright orange carpet in Daniel Newberg Gallery, activating the space in an unprecedented way. Confronted with empty white walls, visitors instead could consider the pictorial qualities of the architectural interior.  Two years later, at the Biennale di Venezia, Stingel installed a red-orange carpet on the wall, further commenting on the power of display. And in 2004, his site-specific installation Plan B incorporated Stingel’s career-long interest in patterns and repetition, covering the floors of Grand Central Terminal’s Vanderbilt Hall in industrially printed pink and blue floral carpet.

The tensions between wall and floor, tactility and illusion run throughout Stingel’s oeuvre. In 1994, he created a series of monochromatic works cast in polyurethane, rubber compound, aluminum, or bronze. Boldly colored, the works are cast from sections of shag carpets, yet they hang on the wall like minimalist paintings. These were followed by the Styrofoam works of the late nineties and early 2000s. Panels of pink, white, blue, or green Styrofoam (often featuring their industrial logos) become platforms for Stingel’s patterns and gestures: from more mechanical grids of circles and ellipses to meandering lines and footprints.

In 2001, for his solo exhibition at the Museo d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea in Trento, Italy, Stingel lined every available surface of one of the rooms of the museum with metallic Celotex insulation board and visitors drew, wrote, and made imprints on the surface of the reflective silver paneling. Eschewing the preciousness of the artist’s unique mark in favor of the collective gestures of thousands of viewers, Stingel repeated this participatory installation at the 50th Biennale di Venezia (2003); Palazzo Grassi, Venice, (2006); and at his retrospective at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2007), which traveled to the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, later that year.

Since 2005 Stingel has been painting photorealistic portraits of himself and others, as well as captivating views of mountains and sunsets. His first series of photorealistic self-portraits, Untitled (After Sam) (2005–06), was painted after black-and-white photographs of Stingel taken by American photographer Sam Samore. These were followed by paintings based on photographs of Stingel as a young man, both in black-and-white and in color, each painting capturing details such as the scratches and creases of the original printed photographs. These works enter into dialogue with Stingel’s metallic paintings based on carpet patterns, Damask wallpaper, chain link fences, and more.

Stingel’s site-specific exhibitions have become increasingly immersive, as he transforms galleries and museums into total works of art. His exhibition Live at the Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin (2010) included a wall-to-wall black-and-white carpet printed with an image of an Agra rug, a huge crystal chandelier, and hyperrealistic paintings of the Alps; and at Palazzo Grassi in 2013, he covered the floors and walls with a carpet printed with the pattern of an older Oriental rug, and hung both abstract and photorealistic paintings over it, creating a subdued, all-encompassing environment for his work.

In 2015 Stingel embarked on a series of eight consecutive installations at Gagosian’s Park & 75 gallery in New York, conceived as a single monumental exhibition. In Part I (2015) Stingel presented large oil paintings with multicolored impressions of a Chintamani carpet and a small portrait on paper of a youthful Franz West; Part II (2016) included gold paintings with a chain-link pattern, a small grisaille portrait of Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, and white wall-to-wall carpeting; in Part III (2016) featured large photorealist canvases layered with colorful carpet patterns; Part IV (2016) was a single silver monochrome triptych derived from images of Plan B at Grand Central; Part V (2016) paired a small photorealist portrait with ornate gold paintings; Part VI (2016) consisted of gleaming silver panels cast from sections of inscribed Celotex from previous installations; and both Part VII (2016) and Part VIII (2016–17) presented paintings based on a mural by Ludwig Bemelmans in New York’s Carlyle Hotel.

In 2017, for a private presentation at Casa Malaparte in Capri, Stingel showed multicolored, metallic canvases reminiscent of his early silver paintings—as if the earlier canvases were reflecting some of the spectral color of his more recent sunset works. Stingel’s series continue to build upon and depart from one another, expanding definitions of art and authorship along the way.

Rudolf Stingel

Artwork © Rudolf Stingel

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Succession Picasso 2022; © John Currin; © Jonas Wood; © Mark Tansey; © 2022 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Ellsworth Kelly Foundation. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano

Art Fair

Art Basel 2022

June 16–19, 2022, hall 2, booth B15
Messe Basel
artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel 2022 with modern and contemporary works by gallery artists, as well as special entries in the Unlimited section of the fair.

Gagosian’s booth in the main section of the fair represents the full breadth and depth of the gallery’s programming through work by many of its represented artists. On view are new works by Mark Grotjahn, Rudolf Stingel, and Jonas Wood; works by newly represented artists including Ashley Bickerton, Rick Lowe, and Jordan Wolfson; and works by Theaster Gates and Brice Marden, both of whom are also exhibiting at other venues in Basel—Gagosian’s gallery at Rheinsprung 1 and Kunstmuseum Basel, respectively—during the fair.

To receive a pdf with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artbasel.com.

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Succession Picasso 2022; © John Currin; © Jonas Wood; © Mark Tansey; © 2022 Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Ellsworth Kelly Foundation. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Hong Kong 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Georg Baselitz; © Louise Bonnet; © Zeng Fanzhi; © 2019 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved; © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Martin Wong

Art Fair

Art Basel Hong Kong 2022

May 27–29, 2022, booth 1C15
Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre
www.artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel Hong Kong 2022 with an ensemble of contemporary works by international artists. The gallery’s presentation will feature works by artists including Georg BaselitzLouise BonnetEdmund de WaalUrs FischerKatharina GrosseMark GrotjahnJennifer GuidiSimon HantaïHao LiangDamien HirstThomas HouseagoTetsuya IshidaAlex IsraelEwa JuszkiewiczRick LoweTakashi MurakamiAlbert OehlenNam June PaikGiuseppe PenoneRudolf PolanszkySterling RubyEd RuschaJenny SavilleJim ShawRudolf StingelSpencer SweeneyRachel Whiteread, and Zeng Fanzhi.

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Hong Kong 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Georg Baselitz; © Louise Bonnet; © Zeng Fanzhi; © 2019 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved; © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Martin Wong

Georg Baselitz, No, ja, 2020 © Georg Baselitz. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

Art Fair

ART021 Shanghai 2021

November 13–14, 2021, booth C02
Shanghai Exhibition Center
www.art021.org

Gagosian is pleased to participate in ART021 Shanghai 2021. The gallery will feature works by artists including Georg BaselitzDan ColenEdmund de WaalRoe EthridgeUrs FischerKatharina GrosseSimon HantaïDamien HirstJia AiliHarmony Korine, Takashi Murakami (as an individual artist and in collaboration with Virgil Abloh), Rudolf StingelSpencer Sweeney, and Tatiana Trouvé

To receive a pdf with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com.

Georg Baselitz, No, ja, 2020 © Georg Baselitz. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

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Museum Exhibitions

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2001, installation view, Bourse de Commerce, Paris © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: © Aurélien Mole

On View

Rudolf Stingel in
Une seconde d’éternité

Through January 2, 2023
Bourse de Commerce, Paris
www.pinaultcollection.com

Une seconde d’éternité brings together twenty artists whose works “generate a space-time.” The installation creates a landscape that enters into dialogue with the architecture, from the darkness of the lower level to the light of the upper galleries. The exhibition is inspired by the oeuvre of Felix Gonzalez-Torres and his work’s openness to tangible emotions and to new forms of connection and aesthetic experiences. Work by Rudolf Stingel is included.

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2001, installation view, Bourse de Commerce, Paris © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: © Aurélien Mole

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2021, installation view, By Art Matters, Hangzhou, China © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Young Zhou

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Rudolf Stingel in
A Show about Nothing

December 25, 2021–May 8, 2022
By Art Matters, Hangzhou, China
www.byartmatters.com

A Show about Nothing, the inaugural exhibition at By Art Matters, brings together more than thirty Chinese and international artists whose works explore and interpret the notion of “nothingness.” The exhibition was conceptualized by the museum’s director, Francesco Bonami, and curated by Stefano Collicelli Cagol, Wu Tian, and Sun Man. Work by Rudolf Stingel is included.

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2021, installation view, By Art Matters, Hangzhou, China © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Young Zhou

Installation view, Rudolf Stingel, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, May 22, 2021–January 17, 2022. Artwork © Rudolf Stingel

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Rudolf Stingel

May 22, 2021–January 17, 2022
Bourse de Commerce, Paris
www.pinaultcollection.com

The Bourse de Commerce presents three portraits by Rudolf Stingel as part of its inaugural series of exhibitions. The first depicts art dealer Paula Cooper, an indefatigable pioneer and defender of the avant-garde; the second shows his friend Franz West; and the last portrays the German Expressionist painter Ernst Ludwig Kirchner dressed in a soldier’s uniform. Based on small-format photographs that the artist dramatically enlarges without erasing the graininess, blurring, or evidence of wear and tear, these images are faithfully transposed via Stingel’s meticulous painting.

Installation view, Rudolf Stingel, Bourse de Commerce, Paris, May 22, 2021–January 17, 2022. Artwork © Rudolf Stingel

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002 © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

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Hey! Did you know that art does not exist…

July 27, 2021–January 8, 2022
Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel
www.tamuseum.org.il

This exhibition presents more than one hundred works from Sylvio Perlstein’s intensely personal collection, which traces artists and trends that have defined the avant-garde, complex, and experimental nature of twentieth-century art. Work by Jean-Michel BasquiatDuane HansonRoy LichtensteinMan RayBrice Marden, Ed RuschaRudolf Stingel, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol is included.

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002 © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

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Press

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