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Andy Warhol

Liz

September 16–October 22, 2011
West 21st Street, New York

Andy Warhol: Liz Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol: Liz

Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol: Liz Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol: Liz

Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol: Liz Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol: Liz

Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol: Liz Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol: Liz

Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol: Liz Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Andy Warhol: Liz

Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation video Play Button

Installation video

Works Exhibited

Andy Warhol, Blue Liz as Cleopatra, 1962 Acrylic, silkscreen ink, and pencil on linen, 82 ½ × 65 inches (209.6 × 165.1 cm). Daros Collection, Switzerland© 2011 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts/ ARS, NY

Andy Warhol, Blue Liz as Cleopatra, 1962

Acrylic, silkscreen ink, and pencil on linen, 82 ½ × 65 inches (209.6 × 165.1 cm). Daros Collection, Switzerland
© 2011 Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts/ ARS, NY

About

She was unquestionably gorgeous. I can think of no other word to describe a combination of plentitude, frugality, abundance, tightness. She was lavish. She was a dark unyielding largesse. She was, in short, too bloody much.
—Richard Burton

Gagosian Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of portraits by Andy Warhol of the late Elizabeth Taylor.

Frequently hailed as the greatest movie star of all time, Taylor was a friend of Warhol’s in the 1970s and 1980s. The personification of charisma whose highly public life charged with drama, tragedy, and romance, this iconic muse was a perfect vehicle for Warhol’s vivid silkscreen portraiture derived from press clippings, publicity shots, and film stills.

From her early years as a child star with MGM, Taylor became one of the world's most famous actresses, recognized first for her acting ability, her glamorous lifestyle, her beauty, her husbands, her jewels, and her violet eyes — and later as a courageous and tireless social activist. Warhol made over fifty portraits of her in all her incarnations— from the ethereally beautiful child-actress (National Velvet, 1963) to the commanding, voluptuous screen goddess (Blue Liz as Cleopatra, 1962).

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