Menu

Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol, Piss Painting, 1978 Urine on gesso on canvas, 78 × 194 inches (198.1 × 492.8 cm)

Andy Warhol, Piss Painting, 1978

Urine on gesso on canvas, 78 × 194 inches (198.1 × 492.8 cm)

Andy Warhol, Silver Clouds, 1966 Silver mylar, helium, and air, Dimensions variable

Andy Warhol, Silver Clouds, 1966

Silver mylar, helium, and air, Dimensions variable

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait, 1964 Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 20 × 16 inches (50.8 × 40.6 cm)

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait, 1964

Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 20 × 16 inches (50.8 × 40.6 cm)

About

Isn’t life a series of images that change as they repeat themselves?
—Andy Warhol

Andy Warhol’s (1928–1987) art encapsulates the 1960s through the 1980s in New York. By imitating the familiar aesthetics of mass media, advertising, and celebrity culture, Warhol blurred the boundaries between his work and the world that inspired it, producing images that have become as pervasive as their sources.

Warhol grew up in a working-class suburb of Pittsburgh. His parents were Slovak immigrants, and he was the only member of his family to attend college. He entered the Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon University) in 1945, where he majored in pictorial design. After graduation, he moved to New York with fellow student Philip Pearlstein and found steady work as a commercial illustrator at several magazines, including Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, and the New Yorker. Throughout the 1950s Warhol enjoyed a successful career as a commercial artist, winning several commendations from the Art Directors Club and the American Institute of Graphic Arts. He had his first solo exhibition at the Hugo Gallery in 1952, showing drawings based on the writings of Truman Capote; three years later his work was included in a group show at the Museum of Modern Art for the first time.

The year 1960 marked a turning point in Warhol’s prolific career. He painted his first works based on comics and advertisements, enlarging and transferring the source images onto canvas using a projector. In 1961 Warhol showed these hand-painted works, including Little King (1961) and Saturday’s Popeye (1961), in a window display at the department store Bonwit Teller; in 1962 he painted his famous Campbell’s Soup Cans, thirty-two separate canvases, each depicting a canned soup of a different flavor. Soon after, Warhol began to borrow not only the subject matter of printed media, but the technology as well. Incorporating the silkscreen technique, he created grids of stamps, Coca-Cola bottles, shipping and handling labels, dollar bills, coffee labels, and more, breaking down the images to their basic graphic components.

In 1963 Warhol established a studio on East 47th Street, which became known as the Factory and served as a cultural hub for artists, models, performers, and socialites. His inner circle comprised his Superstars, who played a major role in both his work and his social life. Interested in the production of fame, Warhol began to screen-print images of celebrities and public figures, from Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley to Jackie Kennedy and Mao Zedong. Expanding his practice, as well as his cultural influence, he produced records (The Velvet Underground & Nico), started a magazine (Interview), and made avant-garde films, such as Chelsea Girls (1966), Blow Job (1964), and Empire (1964), which have become classics of the underground genre.

Following a close run-in with death when Valerie Solanas shot him in 1968, Warhol entered a more subdued, isolated period, working primarily on a commissioned basis and painting portraits for various patrons, while also revisiting themes from his earlier work. He then began to pursue a new interest in abstraction, first with his Oxidations (1977–78), made by allowing friends and acquaintances to urinate on canvases painted with metallic pigments, and later with his Rorschach (1984) and Camouflage (1986) paintings.

By the early 1980s Warhol was producing work across media with a renewed vigor, hosting half-hour programs on MTV, publishing books, and collaborating with younger artists including Jean-Michel Basquiat, Francesco Clemente, and Keith Haring. His abstract series coincided with large-scale works that looked back at masterpieces by Leonardo da Vinci: he screen-printed images of the Mona Lisa (1503) and created several monumental canvases of The Last Supper (1495–98). Warhol’s ability to seamlessly combine art historical reference, abstract patterns, and mass media set new standards for the role of the artist, permanently blurring the lines between commercial and fine art.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Installation view, A line (a)round an idea: Selected Works on Paper, Gagosian, Geneva, May 2–July 27, 2019. Artwork, left to right: © Cy Twombly Foundation; © 2019 Richard Artschwager/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © 2019 The Franz Kline Estate/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Richard Serra; © 2019 Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Tour

A line (a)round an idea
Selected Works on Paper

Saturday, June 22, 2019, 11am
Gagosian, Geneva

Join us for a tour of A line (a)round an idea at Gagosian, Geneva. The exhibition, which presents black-and-white works on paper spanning a period of seventy years, includes work by Richard Artschwager, Georg Baselitz, Bruce Conner, Willem de Kooning, Günther Förg, Sam Francis, Keith Haring, Christine Hiebert, Hans Hofmann, Franz Kline, Brice Marden, Henri Matisse, Robert Motherwell, Ad Reinhardt, Richard Serra, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, and others. Gagosian’s Johan Nauckhoff will give an overview of the exhibition, focusing on ways in which modern and contemporary artists have explored the clarity and activating power of the simple line, mark, splatter, or stroke. To attend this free event, RSVP to genevatours@gagosian.com. Space is limited.

Installation view, A line (a)round an idea: Selected Works on Paper, Gagosian, Geneva, May 2–July 27, 2019. Artwork, left to right: © Cy Twombly Foundation; © 2019 Richard Artschwager/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © 2019 The Franz Kline Estate/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Richard Serra; © 2019 Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Zeng Fanzhi, Rooster, 2019 © 2019 Zeng Fanzhi

Art Fair

Art Basel Hong Kong

March 29–31, 2019, booth 1C18
Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre
www.artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel Hong Kong 2019, with works by Georg Baselitz, Edmund de Waal, Urs Fischer, Katharina Grosse, Andreas Gursky, Duane Hanson, Damien Hirst, Thomas Houseago, Yayoi Kusama, René Magritte, Giorgio Morandi, Takashi Murakami, Albert Oehlen, Nam June Paik, Richard Prince, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, Rachel Whiteread, Jonas Wood, Christopher Wool, Zao Wou-Ki, Zeng Fanzhi, and others. 

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artbasel.com.

Download the full press release in English, Simplified Chinese, or Traditional Chinese

Zeng Fanzhi, Rooster, 2019 © 2019 Zeng Fanzhi

Georg Baselitz, 5 mal endwärts, 2018 © Georg Baselitz 2019

Art Fair

Taipei Dangdai

January 18–20, 2019, booth D13
Taipei Nangang Exhibition Center
taipeidangdai.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in the inaugural edition of Taipei Dangdai, Taiwan’s first international art fair. Marking the gallery’s first presentation in Taiwan, the booth will include artworks by Georg Baselitz, Joe Bradley, John Currin, Edmund de Waal, Urs Fischer, Helen Frankenthaler, Katharina Grosse, Damien Hirst, Thomas Houseago, Takashi Murakami & Virgil Abloh, Nam June Paik, Sterling Ruby, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, and others.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at taipeidangdai.com. To preview our booth, go to artsy.net.

Download the full press release in English, Simplified Chinese, or Traditional Chinese

Georg Baselitz, 5 mal endwärts, 2018 © Georg Baselitz 2019

See all News for Andy Warhol

Museum Exhibitions

Andy Warhol, Ladies and Gentlemen (Wilhelmina Ross), 1975 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York.

Just Opened

Andy Warhol
From A to B and Back Again

Through September 2, 2019
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
www.sfmoma.org

Few American artists are as widely known and instantly recognizable as Andy Warhol. This exhibition—the first Warhol retrospective organized in the US since 1989—reconsiders his work with more than 350 works of art, many assembled together for the first time. Building on a wealth of new materials, research, and scholarship that has emerged since the artist’s untimely death in 1987, this exhibition, curated by Donna De Salvo, reveals new complexities about the Warhol we think we know, and introduces a Warhol for the twenty-first century. This exhibition has traveled from the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

Andy Warhol, Ladies and Gentlemen (Wilhelmina Ross), 1975 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York.

Douglas Gordon, August 12, 1999, 2011 © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019

On View

Fly Me to the Moon
The Moon Landing: 50 Years On

Through June 30, 2019
Kunsthaus Zürich
www.kunsthaus.ch

This year marks the fiftieth anniversary of the first moon landing, and this exhibition explores the history of artists’ engagement with the moon via some two hundred works. Divided into thematic sections, the show focuses on subjects such as lunar topography, moonlit night, the moon’s shadow, ailments associated with the moon, zero gravity, and the moon as mass-media phenomenon. Work by Douglas Gordon and Andy Warhol is included.

Douglas Gordon, August 12, 1999, 2011 © Studio lost but found/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019

Installation view, Andy Warhol: Shadows, Dia:Beacon, New York, 2003–11. Artwork © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Bill Jacobson Studio, New York

On View

Andy Warhol
Shadows

Opened January 26, 2019
Dia:Beacon, New York
www.diaart.org

Andy Warhol’s Shadows (1978–79) was first presented by Dia in 1979. A single painting in multiple parts, Shadows is one of Warhol’s most abstract works, yet one that cohesively synthesizes key elements of his practice, including film, painting, photography, and screen printing. The installation surrounds the viewer with a series of canvases, presented edge-to-edge around the perimeter of the room, in conformity with Warhol’s original vision. Most recently the work was installed by Dia at the Calvin Klein Headquarters in New York.

Installation view, Andy Warhol: Shadows, Dia:Beacon, New York, 2003–11. Artwork © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Bill Jacobson Studio, New York

Andy Warhol, Self-Portait, 1966 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./2019, ProLitteris, Zürich

Opening Soon

Ombres
De la Renaissance à nos jours

June 28–October 27, 2019
Fondation de l’Hermitage, Lausanne, Switzerland
www.fondation-hermitage.ch

The Fondation de l’Hermitage is exploring the use of the shadow in Western iconography. The exhibition features an entirely new selection of nearly 140 artworks, representing a diverse range of artistic forms, from painting to installation, sculpture, prints, drawings, cut-outs, photography, and video. Work by Man Ray, Pablo Picasso, and Andy Warhol is included.

Andy Warhol, Self-Portait, 1966 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc./2019, ProLitteris, Zürich

See all Museum Exhibitions for Andy Warhol

Press

See all Press