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Brice Marden

Red Yellow Blue

January 17–February 23, 2013
980 Madison Avenue, New York

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Installation video

Installation view Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view  Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view  Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view  Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view  Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view  Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Brice Marden, Red Yellow Blue III, 1974 Oil and wax on canvas, 74 × 72 inches (188 × 182.9 cm)© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Red Yellow Blue III, 1974

Oil and wax on canvas, 74 × 72 inches (188 × 182.9 cm)
© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Red Yellow Blue II, 1974 Oil and beeswax on fabric, 73 ¼ × 72 ½ inches (186.1 × 184.2 cm)The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, The Barry Lowen Collection© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Red Yellow Blue II, 1974

Oil and beeswax on fabric, 73 ¼ × 72 ½ inches (186.1 × 184.2 cm)
The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, The Barry Lowen Collection
© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Red Yellow Blue I, 1974 Oil and wax on fabric, 74 × 72 inches (188 × 192.9 cm)Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, James S. Ely Fund, 1974© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Red Yellow Blue I, 1974

Oil and wax on fabric, 74 × 72 inches (188 × 192.9 cm)
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, James S. Ely Fund, 1974
© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

About

I paint paintings made up of one, two, or three panels. I work from panel to panel. I will paint on one until I arrive at a color that holds that plane. I move to another panel and paint until something is holding that plane that also interestingly relates to the other panels. I work the third, searching for a color value that pulls the planes together into a plane that has aesthetic meaning.
—Brice Marden

Gagosian is pleased to present Brice Marden’s Red Yellow Blue paintings. This is the first time that all four paintings comprising the historic group have been shown together, with loans from the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York; and private collections in the United States. Fourth Figure (Red Yellow Blue) (1973–74), a related painting that treats the chromatic primaries as a composition of three horizontal bands, will also be on view.

Marden’s early monochromatic paintings exist as single panels, diptychs, and triptychs. Restraining the gestural intensity of Color Field painting through contemplative reserve and calm, their inscrutable surfaces belie a nuanced equilibrium between emotive passion and formal rigor.

In each of the Red Yellow Blue paintings (1974), Marden painted slabs of dense yet nuanced color on three adjoined canvas panels, using oil paint mixed on the spot with melted beeswax and turpentine and applied with a knife and spatula. The dull sheen of the encaustic medium intensifies the bold, contrasting color blocks, built up through the temperamental layering process that yielded such intricately worked surfaces. The spirited variations within each “primary” trio (where red can range from cadmium to almost black, yellow from ochre to saffron, and blue from cobalt to sullen indigo) are rich with interpretative possibility—like musical chords improvised in major and minor keys.

River Café menu with illustration by Ed Ruscha.

The River Café Cookbook

London’s River Café, a culinary mecca perched on a bend in the River Thames, celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in 2018. To celebrate this milestone and the publication of her cookbook River Café London, cofounder Ruth Rogers sat down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the famed restaurant’s allure.

Glenstone Museum.

Intimate Grandeur: Glenstone Museum

Paul Goldberger tracks the evolution of Mitchell and Emily Rales’s Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. Set amid 230 acres of pristine landscape and housing a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art, this graceful complex of pavilions, designed by architects Thomas Phifer and Partners, opened to the public in the fall of 2018.

Brice Marden: Four Quartets

Brice Marden: Four Quartets

Four paintings by Brice Marden have been incorporated into a new dance commission based on T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, with choreography by Pam Tanowitz, and music by Kaija Saariaho. The performance will premiere on July 6, 2018 at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard as part of the SummerScape Festival. Gideon Lester, the Fisher Center’s artistic director for theater and dance, spoke with Marden about the canvases that form the set design.

Robert Pincus-Witten on Brice Marden

Robert Pincus-Witten on Brice Marden

In honor of Robert Pincus-Witten, we share an essay he wrote in 1991 on Brice Marden’s Grove Group.

Brice Marden, Gary Hume, and Tim Marlow

In Conversation
Brice Marden, Gary Hume, and Tim Marlow

At the Royal Academy of Arts in London, Brice Marden sat down with fellow painter Gary Hume and the Royal Academy’s artistic director, Tim Marlow, to discuss his newest body of work.

Brice Marden

Work in Progress
Brice Marden

With preparations underway for a London exhibition, we visit the artist’s studio.