Menu

Brice Marden

Brice Marden, Nebraska, 1966 Oil and wax on canvas, 58 × 72 inches (147.3 × 182.9 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Nebraska, 1966

Oil and wax on canvas, 58 × 72 inches (147.3 × 182.9 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Patent Leather Valentine, 1967 Wax and graphite over pastel on paper, 16 ½ × 14 ¾ inches (41.9 × 37.5 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Patent Leather Valentine, 1967

Wax and graphite over pastel on paper, 16 ½ × 14 ¾ inches (41.9 × 37.5 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Grove Group II, 1972–73 Oil and wax on canvas, in 2 parts, overall: 72 × 108 inches (182.9 × 274.3 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Grove Group II, 1972–73

Oil and wax on canvas, in 2 parts, overall: 72 × 108 inches (182.9 × 274.3 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Red Yellow Blue III, 1974 Oil and wax on canvas, in 3 parts, overall: 74 × 72 inches (188 × 182.9 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Red Yellow Blue III, 1974

Oil and wax on canvas, in 3 parts, overall: 74 × 72 inches (188 × 182.9 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Thira, 1979–80 Oil and wax on canvas, 18 panels assembled in 3 parts, overall: 96 × 180 inches (243.8 × 457.2 cm), Centre Pompidou, Paris© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Thira, 1979–80

Oil and wax on canvas, 18 panels assembled in 3 parts, overall: 96 × 180 inches (243.8 × 457.2 cm), Centre Pompidou, Paris
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, 2 (Dialog), 1987–88 Oil on linen, 84 × 60 inches (213.4 × 152.4 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, 2 (Dialog), 1987–88

Oil on linen, 84 × 60 inches (213.4 × 152.4 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Cold Mountain 6 (Bridge), 1989–91 Oil on linen, 108 × 144 inches (274.3 × 365.8 cm), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Cold Mountain 6 (Bridge), 1989–91

Oil on linen, 108 × 144 inches (274.3 × 365.8 cm), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, 2 Red Rocks 3, 2000/02 Kremer ink on L’Aquarelle paper, 14 ⅞ × 20 inches (37.8 × 50.8 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, 2 Red Rocks 3, 2000/02

Kremer ink on L’Aquarelle paper, 14 ⅞ × 20 inches (37.8 × 50.8 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Dragons, 2000–04 Ink on paper, 40 ½ × 29 ¾ inches (102.9 × 75.6 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Dragons, 2000–04

Ink on paper, 40 ½ × 29 ¾ inches (102.9 × 75.6 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Blue Sutra Drawing, 2010 Kremer ink on paper, 30 ⅛ × 41 inches (76.5 × 104.1 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Blue Sutra Drawing, 2010

Kremer ink on paper, 30 ⅛ × 41 inches (76.5 × 104.1 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Early Seasons, 2010–11 Kremer ink on Rives BFK paper, in 4 parts, overall: 17 ½ × 52 ¼ inches (44.5 × 132.7 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Early Seasons, 2010–11

Kremer ink on Rives BFK paper, in 4 parts, overall: 17 ½ × 52 ¼ inches (44.5 × 132.7 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Helen’s Immediately, 2011 Oil on marble, 19 ½ × 31 ½ × ⅞ inches (49.5 × 80 × 2.1 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Helen’s Immediately, 2011

Oil on marble, 19 ½ × 31 ½ × ⅞ inches (49.5 × 80 × 2.1 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Polke Letter, 2010–11 Oil on linen, 72 × 96 inches (182.9 × 243.8 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Polke Letter, 2010–11

Oil on linen, 72 × 96 inches (182.9 × 243.8 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, African Drawing 17, 2011–12 Kremer ink and Kremer white shellac ink on Rives BFK paper, 14 ⅞ × 11 ⅛ inches (37.8 × 28.3 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, African Drawing 17, 2011–12

Kremer ink and Kremer white shellac ink on Rives BFK paper, 14 ⅞ × 11 ⅛ inches (37.8 × 28.3 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Nevis Stele 4, 2007–15 Oil on linen, 60 × 36 inches (152.4 × 91.4 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Nevis Stele 4, 2007–15

Oil on linen, 60 × 36 inches (152.4 × 91.4 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Uphill with Center, 2012–15 Oil on linen, in 5 parts, overall: 48 × 192 inches (121.9 × 487.7 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Uphill with Center, 2012–15

Oil on linen, in 5 parts, overall: 48 × 192 inches (121.9 × 487.7 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Eastern Moss, 2012–15 Oil on linen, in 9 parts, overall: 24 × 162 inches (61 × 411.5 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Eastern Moss, 2012–15

Oil on linen, in 9 parts, overall: 24 × 162 inches (61 × 411.5 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Blockx, 2016–17 Oil on linen, 96 ⅛ × 72 inches (244 × 182.9 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Blockx, 2016–17

Oil on linen, 96 ⅛ × 72 inches (244 × 182.9 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Marrakech Drawing 6, 2017–18 Kremer ink and Kremer white shellac ink on Howell paper, 17 ⅛ × 12 ⅝ inches (43.5 × 32.1 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Marrakech Drawing 6, 2017–18

Kremer ink and Kremer white shellac ink on Howell paper, 17 ⅛ × 12 ⅝ inches (43.5 × 32.1 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Santorini 2, 2010–18 Oil on linen, 75 ⅛ × 53 ½ inches (190.8 × 135.9 cm)© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Santorini 2, 2010–18

Oil on linen, 75 ⅛ × 53 ½ inches (190.8 × 135.9 cm)
© 2018 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

About

Ultimately I’m using the painting as a sounding board for the spirit. . . . You can be painting and go into a place where thought stops—where you can just be and it just comes out. . . . I present it as an open situation rather than a closed situation. 
—Brice Marden

Brice Marden continuously refines and extends the traditions of lyrical abstraction. Experimenting with self-imposed rules, limits, and processes, and drawing inspiration from his extensive travels, Marden brings together the diagrammatic formulations of Minimalism, the immediacy of Abstract Expressionism, and the intuitive gesture of calligraphy in his exploration of gesture, line, and color.

In 1963 Marden received an MFA from Yale University’s School of Art and Architecture, where his teachers included the painters Alex Katz and Jon Schueler. After graduation he worked as a guard at the Jewish Museum in New York. There, during a 1964 Jasper Johns retrospective, Marden studied Johns’s early works extensively and considered them in relation to the Baroque masters he has long admired, such as Francisco de Zurbarán, Francisco Goya, and Diego Velázquez. Marden’s works from the 1960s include subtle, shimmering monochromes in gray tones, sometimes assembled canvases into multipanel works, in a manner similar to the black paintings and White Paintings of Robert Rauschenberg, who hired Marden as a studio assistant in 1966.

A trip to Greece in the early 1970s led Marden to create the Hydra paintings (1972), which capture the turquoise hues of the Mediterranean, and Thira (1979–80), a painting composed of eighteen interconnected panels inspired by the shadows and geometry of ancient temples. To heighten the effect of each color, plane, and brushstroke, Marden developed the unique process of adding beeswax and turpentine to oil paint and applying the mixture in many thin layers. Marden employed this technique for the Grove Group paintings (1972–76)—exhibited at Gagosian’s Madison Avenue gallery in New York in 1991, along with related works—and the Red Yellow Blue paintings (1973–74)—five permutations of the primary trio—which were united for the first time since their making at Gagosian, 980 Madison Avenue, New York in 2013.

In the 1980s Marden began to incorporate organic, intersecting lines, creating rhythmic patterns over fields of color. He has been exploring these winding lines ever since, experimenting with blank space, erasure, and references to the natural world. He seeks to create a mystical experience through the creation of elusive abstract spaces. As his many themes and techniques have overlapped, Marden has sought to bring them together in cohesive, often multipart works, which he has described as his “summation paintings.” Among them is The Propitious Garden of Plane Image, Third Version (2000–06), held in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, where he had his first comprehensive retrospective in 2006.

In recent years Marden has continued his exploration of the qualities of monochrome. This engagement with muted colors has informed new calligraphic drawings and works on canvas, such as the Nevis Stele paintings (2007–15), inspired by Chinese stone carvings from the late eighth century. In 2017 he turned his gaze to the expansive possibilities of terre verte (green earth), an iron silicate clay pigment, which he first used in the Grove Group. His new paintings incorporate many different brands of terre verte, each a variation on the indefinable hue. Marden thins his slow-drying paint and applies it gradually to the canvas in many successive layers, leaving a visible residue of the painting process at the lower edge of each canvas.

Jasper Johns, Untitled, 2011, acrylic over intaglio on paper mounted on Fred Siegenthaler “confetti” paper, 11 ¾ × 7 ¾ inches (29.8 × 19.7 cm)

The Generative Surface

Eileen Costello explores the oft-overlooked importance of paper choice to the mediums of drawing and printmaking, from the Renaissance through the present day.

Brice Marden: Sketchbook (Gagosian, 2019); Lee Lozano: Notebooks 1967–70 (Primary Information, 2010); Stanley Whitney: Sketchbook (Lisson Gallery, 2018); Kara Walker: MCMXCIX (ROMA, 2017); Louis Fratino,Sept ’18–Jan. ’19 (Sikkema Jenkins & Co., 2019); Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Notebooks (Princeton University Press, 2015); Keith Haring Journals (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition, 2010).

Book Corner
Private Pages Made Public

Megan N. Liberty explores artists’ engagement with notebooks and diaries, thinking through the various meanings that arise when these private ledgers become public.

River Café menu with illustration by Ed Ruscha.

The River Café Cookbook

London’s River Café, a culinary mecca perched on a bend in the River Thames, celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in 2018. To celebrate this milestone and the publication of her cookbook River Café London, cofounder Ruth Rogers sat down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the famed restaurant’s allure.

Glenstone Museum.

Intimate Grandeur: Glenstone Museum

Paul Goldberger tracks the evolution of Mitchell and Emily Rales’s Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. Set amid 230 acres of pristine landscape and housing a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art, this graceful complex of pavilions, designed by architects Thomas Phifer and Partners, opened to the public in the fall of 2018.

Brice Marden: Four Quartets

Brice Marden: Four Quartets

Four paintings by Brice Marden have been incorporated into a new dance commission based on T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, with choreography by Pam Tanowitz, and music by Kaija Saariaho. The performance will premiere on July 6, 2018 at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard as part of the SummerScape Festival. Gideon Lester, the Fisher Center’s artistic director for theater and dance, spoke with Marden about the canvases that form the set design.

Robert Pincus-Witten on Brice Marden

Robert Pincus-Witten on Brice Marden

In honor of Robert Pincus-Witten, we share an essay he wrote in 1991 on Brice Marden’s Grove Group.

Brice Marden, Gary Hume, and Tim Marlow

In Conversation
Brice Marden, Gary Hume, and Tim Marlow

At the Royal Academy of Arts in London, Brice Marden sat down with fellow painter Gary Hume and the Royal Academy’s artistic director, Tim Marlow, to discuss his newest body of work.

Brice Marden

Work in Progress
Brice Marden

With preparations underway for a London exhibition, we visit the artist’s studio.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Georg Baselitz: Years later (New York: Gagosian, 2020)

Book Fair

Taipei Art Book Fair 2020

November 13–15, 2020
Huashan 1914 Creative Park, Taipei
taipeiartbookfair.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in the Taipei Art Book Fair 2020 as a guest of Taipei Dangdai. Taipei Dangdai has invited its 2020 exhibitors to each showcase three new publications in its booth. Gagosian will present Georg Baselitz: Years Later, which documents a recent exhibition of new works by the artist at Gagosian, Hong Kong; an exhibition catalogue on Brice Marden’s latest paintings and works on paper, which continue the Letter series he initiated in 2006; and Mary Weatherford: I’ve Seen Gray Whales Go By, which documents the artist’s 2018 exhibition at Gagosian, New York, featuring large paintings onto which neon light tubes are attached. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at taipeiartbookfair.com.

Georg Baselitz: Years later (New York: Gagosian, 2020)

Premiere of Four Quartets at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, July 6–8, 2018. Photo: Maria Baranova

Screening

The Four Quartets Experience

October 30–November 1, 2020

Four Quartets, a dance performance based on T. S. Eliot’s modernist poem cycle, with stage design centered on paintings by Brice Marden, was scheduled to be performed at Lincoln Center in New York this fall; however, this and future engagements have been postponed due to the pandemic. To allow audiences around the world an opportunity to view the performance from their homes, the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College will be streaming a film of the Four Quartets world premiere from October 31 at 12am edt through November 1 at 11:59pm edt. To attend the event, purchase tickets at fishercenter.bard.edu.

Premiere of Four Quartets at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York, July 6–8, 2018. Photo: Maria Baranova

Brice Marden (London: Gagosian, 2017)

Online Reading

Brice Marden

Brice Marden is available for online reading from October 11 through November 9 as part of the From the Library series. This catalogue was published on the occasion of the artist’s 2017 exhibition at Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London, and focuses on Marden’s terre verte paintings. For the series of ten identically sized paintings measuring eight by six feet, he has employed ten different brands of terre verte oil paint—from his favored Williamsburg to Holbein and Sennelier, among others—each a variation on the indefinable hue. The slow-drying paint is thinned and applied gradually to the canvas in many successive veils, building a surface of transparent yet intense color. New texts by Paul Hills and Noah Dillon, and a conversation between Marden, Gary Hume, and Tim Marlow examine this new body of work from multiple perspectives.

Brice Marden (London: Gagosian, 2017)

See all News for Brice Marden

Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Think of Them as Spaces: Brice Marden’s Drawings, Menil Collection, Houston, February 21–October 11, 2020. Artwork © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Paul Hester

Closed

Think of Them as Spaces
Brice Marden’s Drawings

February 21–October 11, 2020
Menil Collection, Houston
www.menil.org

Think of Them as Spaces: Brice Marden’s Drawings is an exploration of the artist’s draftsmanship and of the catalytic role the medium plays within his practice. This exhibition presents six series of drawings that span nearly the entirety of Marden’s ongoing career, highlighting the processes of invention and permutation that occur as he works and thinks on paper.

Installation view, Think of Them as Spaces: Brice Marden’s Drawings, Menil Collection, Houston, February 21–October 11, 2020. Artwork © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Paul Hester

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Ms. Lykes, 2015 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Closed

Duro Olowu
Seeing Chicago

February 29–September 13, 2020
Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
mcachicago.org

Nigerian-born British designer Duro Olowu curates a show that reimagines relationships between artists and objects across time, media, and geography. Moving away from traditional exhibition formats, Olowu combines photographs, paintings, sculptures, and films in dense and textural scenes that incorporate his own work. Work by Brice Marden and Nathaniel Mary Quinn is included.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Ms. Lykes, 2015 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Installation view, Marking Time: Process in Minimal Abstraction, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, December 18, 2019–August 2, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © 2020 David Reed/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Park Seo-Bo; © Chryssa; © 2020 Jacob El Hanani; © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Closed

Marking Time
Process in Minimal Abstraction

December 18, 2019–August 2, 2020
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
www.guggenheim.org

During the 1960s and 1970s, many artists working with abstraction rid their styles of compositional, chromatic, and virtuosic flourishes. As some turned toward such minimal approaches, a singular emphasis on their interaction with materials emerged. The resulting pieces invite viewers to imaginatively reenact aspects of the creative process. Featuring paintings and works on paper, Marking Time explores how drawing attention to the creative process fosters a distinctively empathetic mode of engagement. Work by Brice Marden and David Reed is included.

Installation view, Marking Time: Process in Minimal Abstraction, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, December 18, 2019–August 2, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © 2020 David Reed/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Park Seo-Bo; © Chryssa; © 2020 Jacob El Hanani; © 2020 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Brice Marden, Cold Mountain Study (29), 1988–91 © 2019 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

Closed

Brice Marden
Cold Mountain Studies

June 9–August 11, 2019
“T” Space, Rhinebeck, New York
tspacerhinebeck.org

The thirty-five Cold Mountain drawings on display were key creative experiments leading toward Brice Marden’s widely acclaimed Cold Mountain paintings of the late 1980s. Marden has credited the ninth-century Chinese monk and poet Hanshan (“Cold Mountain”) and translator Bill Porter with inspiring his stylistic shift from monochrome to calligraphic painting.

Brice Marden, Cold Mountain Study (29), 1988–91 © 2019 Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York. Photo: Jochen Littkemann

See all Museum Exhibitions for Brice Marden

Press

See all Press