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Tatiana Trouvé

Studies for Desire Lines

March 3–April 25, 2015
Park & 75, New York

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Works Exhibited

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2014 Ink on canvas, cotton, paper, 78 11/16 × 27 ⅝ inches (200 × 70 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Florian Kleinefenn

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2014

Ink on canvas, cotton, paper, 78 11/16 × 27 ⅝ inches (200 × 70 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Florian Kleinefenn

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2014 (detail) Ink on canvas, cotton, paper, 78 11/16 × 27 ⅝ inches (200 × 70 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Florian Kleinefenn

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2014 (detail)

Ink on canvas, cotton, paper, 78 11/16 × 27 ⅝ inches (200 × 70 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Florian Kleinefenn

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2014 (view 1) Metal, paint, wood, ink, oil, and rope, 28 ¾ × 80 ¾ × 41 ½ inches (73 × 205.1 × 105.4 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2014 (view 1)

Metal, paint, wood, ink, oil, and rope, 28 ¾ × 80 ¾ × 41 ½ inches (73 × 205.1 × 105.4 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2014 (view 2) Metal, paint, wood, ink, oil, and rope, 28 ¾ × 80 ¾ × 41 ½ inches (73 × 205.1 × 105.4 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2014 (view 2)

Metal, paint, wood, ink, oil, and rope, 28 ¾ × 80 ¾ × 41 ½ inches (73 × 205.1 × 105.4 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2012 Pencil on tracing paper, copper, tin, and tape, 24 × 13 ⅜ inches (61 × 37 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2012

Pencil on tracing paper, copper, tin, and tape, 24 × 13 ⅜ inches (61 × 37 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2012 Metal, copper, cardboard, plastic, and rope, 16 ⅛ × 24 3/16 × 5 ⅞ inches (41 × 61.5 × 15 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2012

Metal, copper, cardboard, plastic, and rope, 16 ⅛ × 24 3/16 × 5 ⅞ inches (41 × 61.5 × 15 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2012 Ink on paper, nylon, and cotton, 24 × 14 9/16 inches (61 × 37 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Untitled, 2012

Ink on paper, nylon, and cotton, 24 × 14 9/16 inches (61 × 37 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2012 (view 1) Metal, cardboard, plastic, and rope, 7 ½ × 13 ¾ × 12 ⅝ inches (19 × 35 × 32 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2012 (view 1)

Metal, cardboard, plastic, and rope, 7 ½ × 13 ¾ × 12 ⅝ inches (19 × 35 × 32 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2012 (view 2) Metal, cardboard, plastic, and rope, 7 ½ × 13 ¾ × 12 ⅝ inches (19 × 35 × 32 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2012 (view 2)

Metal, cardboard, plastic, and rope, 7 ½ × 13 ¾ × 12 ⅝ inches (19 × 35 × 32 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2012 Metal, copper, cardboard, plastic, and rope, 18 ⅛ × 24 3/16 × 5 ⅞ inches (41 × 61.5 × 15 cm)© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

Tatiana Trouvé, Desire Lines, 2012

Metal, copper, cardboard, plastic, and rope, 18 ⅛ × 24 3/16 × 5 ⅞ inches (41 × 61.5 × 15 cm)
© Tatiana Trouvé, photo by Laurent Edeline

About

Gagosian New York is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent work by Tatiana Trouvé closely related to and concurrent with her major Public Art Fund commission Desire Lines, which opens to the public on March 3 at Doris C. Freedman Plaza, Central Park. Notes, drawings, tracings, sculptural fragments, and a detailed model of the large-scale sculpture provide a fascinating insight into the artist at work.

Desire Lines speaks not only to Frederick Law Olmsted’s vision of planned wilderness for Central Park and its evolution—the term itself is used in urban design to describe the incidental tracks and alternative routes that emerge over time in relation to designated paths in a landscape—but also to the imagination of the thousands of people who enjoy the park daily.

Desire Lines is a physical inventory of 212 walkable routes in Central Park, which Trouvé mapped and measured. Consistent with her enigma-producing strategy of exposing only to conceal again—already evident in the Bureau of Implicit Activities (1997–present)—she transferred the measurements into a multitude of colored cords, wound on wooden spools and installed on huge metal racks to form an imposing sculptural environment.

As so many of the paths are unnamed, Trouvé then decided to invent an imaginative “atlas” of the history and culture of walking. And so began a second phase of research on the vast historical narrative to which Desire Lines is now dedicated: the social, political and cultural evolution of the march, from the mass activism of Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and the suffragette movement to the diverse artistic gestures of Richard Long, Janet Cardiff/George Bures Miller, Francis Alÿs, Frank Zappa, and Charles Baudelaire. Visitors to Desire Lines can choose a path by name then undertake the walk it describes, tracing the march of history in collective memory while discovering Central Park anew.

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Tatiana Trouvé in her Paris studio.

Behind the Art
Tatiana Trouvé: In the Studio

Join the artist in her studio as she speaks about her new series of drawings, From March to May. Trouvé describes the genesis of the project and the essential role its creation played in keeping her connected with the outside world during the difficult months of pandemic-related lockdown.

Installation view of Urs Fischer’s Untitled (2011) in the exhibition Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, Paris, 2021. Artwork © Urs Fischer, courtesy Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich; Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, Agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Bourse de Commerce

William Middleton traces the development of the new institution, examining the collaboration between the collector François Pinault and the architect Tadao Ando in revitalizing the historic space. Middleton also speaks with artists Tatiana Trouvé and Albert Oehlen about Pinault’s passion as a collector, and with the Bouroullec brothers, who created design features for the interiors and exteriors of the museum.

Tatiana Trouvé, April 4th, The New York Times; April 11th, South China Morning Post, China from the series From March to May, 2020, inkjet print and pencil on paper, 16 ⅝  × 23 ¼ inches (42.1 × 59 cm)

Tatiana Trouvé: From March to May

A portfolio of the artist’s drawings made during lockdown. Text by Jesi Khadivi.

Jenny Saville’s Prism (2020) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly magazine.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2020

The Winter 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Jenny Saville’s Prism (2020) on its cover.

Tatiana Trouvé, Between sky and earth, 2012–.

Tatiana Trouvé: In Time

In upstate New York, Jenny Jaskey discovers Tatiana Trouvé’s Between sky and earth. Begun in 2012, this multifaceted installation exists as a crucial nexus in the artist’s career, both a result of her ongoing practice and a generative source for continuing investigations.

Before the Smoke Has Cleared

Before the Smoke Has Cleared

Angela Brown provides a glimpse into the charged ecologies of recent drawings and sculptures by Tatiana Trouvé. These works will be included in On the Eve of Never Leaving, Trouvé’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles, opening in November 2019.