Menu Skip to content

Extended through July 9, 2016

Jenny Saville

Erota

April 14–July 9, 2016
Davies Street, London

Installation view Artwork © Jenny Saville. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Jenny Saville. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Jenny Saville. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Jenny Saville. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Jenny Saville. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Jenny Saville. Photo: Mike Bruce

Works Exhibited

Jenny Saville, One out of two (symposium), 2016 Charcoal and pastel on canvas, 59 ⅞ × 88 ⅝ inches (152 × 225 cm)© Jenny Saville. Photo: Mike Bruce

Jenny Saville, One out of two (symposium), 2016

Charcoal and pastel on canvas, 59 ⅞ × 88 ⅝ inches (152 × 225 cm)
© Jenny Saville. Photo: Mike Bruce

Jenny Saville, Ebb and Flow, 2015 Oil stain, pastel, and charcoal on canvas, 63 × 102 ⅜ inches (160 × 260 cm)© Jenny Saville. Photo: Ashmolean Museum Photo Studio

Jenny Saville, Ebb and Flow, 2015

Oil stain, pastel, and charcoal on canvas, 63 × 102 ⅜ inches (160 × 260 cm)
© Jenny Saville. Photo: Ashmolean Museum Photo Studio

About

I’m trying to see if it’s possible to hold that tipping moment of perception or have several moments coexist . . . like looking at a memory.
—Jenny Saville

Gagosian is pleased to present Erota, a group of recent drawings by Jenny Saville.

Over her twenty-five-year career, Saville has taken the depiction of the human form in unprecedented directions. Her visceral embodiments confront issues of mortality while attesting to a tenacious formal engagement with the problems and innovations of both classical figuration and radical abstraction.

In the figures of large, sprawling nudes, inspired in part by Titian to Canaletto: Drawing in Venice, a recent exhibition at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford, Saville demonstrates her acute sensitivity to the problems and challenges faced by the Old Masters—including Rembrandt, Raphael, and Titian—while bringing a specifically modern sensibility to bear on classical drawing traditions. The shifting forms and multiple contours of her writhing and coupling figures—in oil stain, pastel, and charcoal on canvas—evoke a world in flux, consistent with the idea that no single reality or perspective can ever be definitive. These corporeal images are like landscapes that reveal themselves to the viewer in real time.

Saville’s forceful marks suggest destruction, regeneration, and a cyclical rhythm of emerging forms, imparting eros, or life force, to her art.

From the Quarterly