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Extended through December 22, 2017

Brice Marden

October 4–December 22, 2017
Grosvenor Hill, London

Installation view Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017. Photo: Mike Bruce

Works Exhibited

Brice Marden, Holbein, 2016–17 Oil on linen, 96 ⅛ × 72 inches (244.2 × 182.9 cm)© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017

Brice Marden, Holbein, 2016–17

Oil on linen, 96 ⅛ × 72 inches (244.2 × 182.9 cm)
© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017

Brice Marden, Williamsburg, 2016–17 Oil on linen, 96 ⅛ × 72 inches (244 × 182.9 cm)© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017

Brice Marden, Williamsburg, 2016–17

Oil on linen, 96 ⅛ × 72 inches (244 × 182.9 cm)
© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017

Brice Marden, Winsor + Newton, 2016–17 Oil on linen, 96 ⅛ × 72 inches (244 × 182.9 cm)© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017

Brice Marden, Winsor + Newton, 2016–17

Oil on linen, 96 ⅛ × 72 inches (244 × 182.9 cm)
© Brice Marden/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, and DACS, London 2017

Brice Marden in his studio, Tivoli, New York, June 2017 Photo: Eric Piasecki

Brice Marden in his studio, Tivoli, New York, June 2017

Photo: Eric Piasecki

Brice Marden’s studio, Tivoli, New York, June 2017 Photo: Eric Piasecki

Brice Marden’s studio, Tivoli, New York, June 2017

Photo: Eric Piasecki

Brice Marden’s studio, Tivoli, New York, June 2017 Photo: Eric Piasecki

Brice Marden’s studio, Tivoli, New York, June 2017

Photo: Eric Piasecki

Brice Marden’s studio, Tivoli, New York, June 2017 Photo: Eric Piasecki

Brice Marden’s studio, Tivoli, New York, June 2017

Photo: Eric Piasecki

About

I kept putting the same color on—the same color, the same color—but every time I put it on it was different. Each time it was this whole new light/color experience. It was not a revelation, but a whole wonderful new experience. . . . To me, it involves harnessing some of the powers of the earth. Harnessing and communicating.
—Brice Marden

Gagosian is pleased to present Brice Marden’s new paintings, in his first exhibition in London since the Serpentine Gallery in 2000.

A singular painter who has extended and refined the traditions of lyrical abstraction, Marden is a master of color and touch, from the subtle, shimmering monochromes of his earlier career to the calligraphic compositions that characterize his work of the last three decades. Recently, Marden has returned to the monochrome, and to the expansive possibilities of terre verte (green earth), an iron silicate/clay pigment. Terre verte came into use during the Renaissance, its greenish hue and innate transparency serving as a base to balance flesh tones; Marden first used it in connection with the Grove Group paintings of the 1970s (exhibited at Gagosian New York in 1991).

Since resuming his engagement with terre verte, Marden has begun layering oil paint of this single color, focusing his conditions in order to heighten them, so to speak. Thus terre verte is both medium and subject as Marden explores its chromatic nuances while reflecting on the material exigencies of painting itself. For a series of ten new, identically sized paintings measuring eight by six feet, he has employed ten different brands of terre verte oil paint—from his favored Williamsburg to Holbein and Sennelier, among others—each a variation on the indefinable hue. The slow-drying paint is thinned and applied gradually to the canvas in many successive veils, building a surface of transparent yet intense color. The contingent residue of these layers forms a visible record of the painting process at the lower edge of each canvas.

With the new paintings, Marden will also exhibit Eastern Moss (2012–15), a smaller nine-panel work that reflects his renewed fascination with the complexities of natural color and human scale.

Brice Marden, Gary Hume, and Tim Marlow

In Conversation
Brice Marden, Gary Hume, and Tim Marlow

At the Royal Academy of Arts in London, Brice Marden sat down with fellow painter Gary Hume and the Royal Academy’s artistic director, Tim Marlow, to discuss his newest body of work.

Brice Marden

Work in Progress
Brice Marden

With preparations underway for a London exhibition, we visit the artist’s studio.

Brice Marden: Sketchbook (Gagosian, 2019); Lee Lozano: Notebooks 1967–70 (Primary Information, 2010); Stanley Whitney: Sketchbook (Lisson Gallery, 2018); Kara Walker: MCMXCIX (ROMA, 2017); Louis Fratino,Sept ’18–Jan. ’19 (Sikkema Jenkins & Co., 2019); Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Notebooks (Princeton University Press, 2015); Keith Haring Journals (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition, 2010).

Book Corner
Private Pages Made Public

Megan N. Liberty explores artists’ engagement with notebooks and diaries, thinking through the various meanings that arise when these private ledgers become public.

River Café menu with illustration by Ed Ruscha.

The River Café Cookbook

London’s River Café, a culinary mecca perched on a bend in the River Thames, celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in 2018. To celebrate this milestone and the publication of her cookbook River Café London, cofounder Ruth Rogers sat down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the famed restaurant’s allure.

Glenstone Museum.

Intimate Grandeur: Glenstone Museum

Paul Goldberger tracks the evolution of Mitchell and Emily Rales’s Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. Set amid 230 acres of pristine landscape and housing a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art, this graceful complex of pavilions, designed by architects Thomas Phifer and Partners, opened to the public in the fall of 2018.

Brice Marden: Four Quartets

Brice Marden: Four Quartets

Four paintings by Brice Marden have been incorporated into a new dance commission based on T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets, with choreography by Pam Tanowitz, and music by Kaija Saariaho. The performance will premiere on July 6, 2018 at the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard as part of the SummerScape Festival. Gideon Lester, the Fisher Center’s artistic director for theater and dance, spoke with Marden about the canvases that form the set design.