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Murakami & Abloh

“AMERICA TOO”

October 10–25, 2018
Beverly Hills

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Installation video

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view

Artwork ©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Works Exhibited

Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, DOB and Arrows: Patchwork Skulls, 2018 Acrylic on canvas mounted on aluminum frame, 34 × 23 inches (86.4 × 58.4 cm)© Virgil Abloh and © Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, DOB and Arrows: Patchwork Skulls, 2018

Acrylic on canvas mounted on aluminum frame, 34 × 23 inches (86.4 × 58.4 cm)
© Virgil Abloh and © Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, Yellow and Pink, 2018 Acrylic on canvas mounted on aluminum frame, 55 ¾ × 47 ⅜ inches (141.6 × 120.3 cm)©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, Yellow and Pink, 2018

Acrylic on canvas mounted on aluminum frame, 55 ¾ × 47 ⅜ inches (141.6 × 120.3 cm)
©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, “TIMES: FLAMES”, 2018 Acrylic on canvas mounted on board, 70 ⅞ × 70 ⅞ inches (180 × 180 cm)©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, “TIMES: FLAMES”, 2018

Acrylic on canvas mounted on board, 70 ⅞ × 70 ⅞ inches (180 × 180 cm)
©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, Arrows and Flower Neon Sign, 2018 Neon, aluminum, and stainless steel, 108 ⅞ × 78 ¾ × 78 ¾ inches (276.5 × 200 × 200 cm)©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, Arrows and Flower Neon Sign, 2018

Neon, aluminum, and stainless steel, 108 ⅞ × 78 ¾ × 78 ¾ inches (276.5 × 200 × 200 cm)
©︎ Virgil Abloh and ©︎ Takashi Murakami. Photo: Joshua White

About

There is a zone of supremacy in the art world and there is a sense that fine art is the most precious and has the highest status. My collaboration with Virgil is trying to create something that is completely outside of that framework.
—Takashi Murakami

Satire and irony are looming themes that are part of our now. Our dialogue is not so much embedded in the art; it’s embedded in the atmosphere that we’re creating.
—Virgil Abloh

Gagosian is pleased to present new works by Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, following future history at Gagosian London, and “TECHNICOLOR 2” at Gagosian Paris.

Murakami and Abloh have created an art, media, and production collaboration in layered paintings, large-scale sculptures, and the merging of their respective trademarks and brand names. Multihyphenate cult figures in their fields, they push against the parameters of fashion, art, and popular culture, provocatively blurring the lines between them.

In his protean oeuvre, Murakami draws from sources as diverse as classical Japanese painting, otaku subculture, Western art theory, Hollywood cinema, and hip-hop. His expansive art production spills over into fashion, film, and commercial commodities both luxurious and inexpensive, eschewing entrenched divisions between high art and popular culture.

Abloh, trained as an architect and engineer, works across fashion, architecture, performance, and consumer products, often deconstructing the creative process in public to challenge and analyze existing aesthetic systems and their distribution. His street-couture label Off-White, which he founded in 2013, combines conventional tailoring with more subversive references, while his role as the artistic director of Louis Vuitton’s menswear places his current design work in dialogue with Murakami’s celebrated collaborations with Vuitton, beginning in 2002.

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“AMERICA TOO”

“AMERICA TOO”

Join us for an exclusive look at the installation and opening reception of Murakami & Abloh: “AMERICA TOO”.

Takashi Murakami with works from his ceramics collection.

Murakami on Ceramics

Takashi Murakami writes about his commitment to the work of Japanese ceramic artists associated with the seikatsu kōgei, or lifestyle crafts, movement.

Takashi Murakami with his dog, Pom, Full Steam Ahead, Dark Matter in the Farthest Black Reaches of Visible Space, and Blue Flowers & Skulls (all 2012), Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd., studio, Saitama, Japan, 2012

In Conversation
Takashi Murakami and Hans Ulrich Obrist

Hans Ulrich Obrist interviews the artist on the occasion of his 2012 exhibition Takashi Murakami: Flowers & Skulls at Gagosian, Hong Kong.

Takashi Murakami at LACMA

Takashi Murakami at LACMA

In a conversation recorded at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Takashi Murakami describes the process behind three major large-scale paintings, including Qinghua (2019), inspired by the motifs painted on a Chinese Yuan Dynasty porcelain vase.

Future History: Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh

In Conversation
Future History: Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh

Following their artistic collaboration in London, Takashi Murakami and Virgil Abloh, the recently appointed Louis Vuitton menswear designer, spoke with Derek Blasberg about how they met, their admiration for each other, and the power of collaboration to educate and impassion new audiences.

Nobuo Tsuji vs. Takashi Murakami

Nobuo Tsuji vs. Takashi Murakami

From 2009 to 2011 the eminent art historian Nobuo Tsuji and Takashi Murakami engaged in a reimagined e-awase (painting contest). In this twenty-one-round contest, newly published in Battle Royale! Japanese Art History, Tsuji selects historical works and Murakami responds creatively. Round 6 centers on the Edo Eccentric painter Soga Shōhaku and his monumental Dragon and Clouds (1763).

News

Photo: Claire Dorn

Artist Spotlight

Takashi Murakami

December 9–15, 2020

Takashi Murakami seamlessly blends commercial imagery, anime, manga, and traditional Japanese styles and subjects, revealing the themes and questions that connect past and present, East and West, technology and fantasy. His paintings, sculptures, and films are populated by repeated motifs and evolving characters of his own creation. Together with dystopian themes and contemporary references, he revitalizes narratives of transcendence in continuation of the nonconformist legacy of a group of eighteenth-century Japanese artists known as the Edo eccentrics.

Photo: Claire Dorn