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Urs Fischer

Images

January 11–February 9, 2019
Beverly Hills

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Installation video

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view with Urs Fischer, Maybe (2018; detail) Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view with Urs Fischer, Maybe (2018; detail)

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Works Exhibited

Urs Fischer, 2 Socks, 2018 Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)© Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer, 2 Socks, 2018

Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)
© Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer, Vue de L’extérieur, 2018 Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)© Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Urs Fischer, Vue de L’extérieur, 2018

Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)
© Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Urs Fischer, Glow, 2018 Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)© Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Urs Fischer, Glow, 2018

Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)
© Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Urs Fischer, Blurrd, 2018 Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)© Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Urs Fischer, Blurrd, 2018

Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)
© Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Urs Fischer, Blue, 2018 Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)© Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Urs Fischer, Blue, 2018

Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, two-component adhesive, primer, gesso, and solvent-based screen printing ink, 89 ½ × 67 ½ inches (227.3 × 171.5 cm)
© Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

About

Art is an after-reflection.
—Urs Fischer

Gagosian is pleased to present Images, an exhibition of new paintings and sculptures by Urs Fischer.

In Fischer’s work, images emerge from an odd liminal space between the real and the imagined, between what does, and could, exist. Over the past year, he has been creating paintings digitally, inventing things, rooms, and spaces using color and light. On a screen, as opposed to paper or canvas, Fischer is able to paint with light itself—moving illuminated pixels around, juxtaposing clean lines and gradients, and reflecting on the subtle atmospheric changes across day and night, summer and winter, Los Angeles and New York.

Silkscreened onto aluminum panels, the paintings in this exhibition—vertical compositions broken up into multiple rectangular passages—take on the scale of modern abstraction, yet they all describe imaginary interior and exterior worlds. Windows appear often: one glows behind a gauzy white curtain, looking onto swaying palm trees; another reflects a sunrise or sunset, with a still life on a table barely visible through fingerprints on the glass; and another frames a building across the street, where nine more windows reveal smeared and fragmented California views. In other paintings, Fischer imagines canvases hanging on walls, hit with swathes and squares of light pouring in from an unseen source. The fictional paintings and sculptures depict animals, food, city streets, or messy brushstrokes, but they—like the light—only exist within Fischer’s constructed environments; they need not adhere to any history, law, or logic.

Fischer presents characters and drawings that seem capable of disappearing at any moment. In one painting, a small orange bird sits on a branch, floating in a dark gray sky. Though its legs are in sharp focus, its body becomes a vaporous orb, glowing within the surrounding clouds. And in an uncanny sculptural ecosystem below, two motorized snails slowly wander through the gallery, leaving trails of slime in their wake. These gleaming lines, which evaporate over time, wind across the floor, uniting the other sculptures—a smoking volcano, a snowman, a palm tree—within a swirling, ephemeral landscape. Looming over the scene, the surrounding paintings form vivid, even cinematic, backdrops: a montage of disparate settings for a small, peculiar world.

Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Winter 2022

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2022

The Winter 2022 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on its cover.

Urs Fischer: Denominator

Urs Fischer: Denominator

Urs Fischer sits down with his friend the author and artist Eric Sanders to address the perfect viewer, the effects of marketing, and the limits of human understanding.

Urs Fischer and Francesco Bonami speaking amidst the installation of "Urs Fischer: Lovers" at Museo Jumex, Mexico City

Urs Fischer: Lovers

The exhibition Urs Fischer: Lovers at Museo Jumex, Mexico City, brings together works from international public and private collections as well as from the artist’s own archive, alongside new pieces made especially for the exhibition. To mark this momentous twenty-year survey, the artist sits down with the exhibition’s curator, Francesco Bonami, to discuss the installation.

Awol Erizku, Lion (Body) I, 2022, Duratrans on lightbox, 49 ⅜ × 65 ⅝ × 3 ¾ inches (125.4 × 166.7 × 9.5 cm) © Awol Erizku

Awol Erizku and Urs Fischer: To Make That Next Move

On the eve of Awol Erizku’s exhibition in New York, he and Urs Fischer discuss what it means to be an image maker, the beauty of blurring genres, the fetishization of authorship, and their shared love for Los Angeles.

Installation view of Urs Fischer’s Untitled (2011) in Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, Paris, 2021. Artwork © Urs Fischer, courtesy Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich; Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, Agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Bourse de Commerce

William Middleton traces the development of the new institution, examining the collaboration between the collector François Pinault and the architect Tadao Ando in revitalizing the historic space. Middleton also speaks with artists Tatiana Trouvé and Albert Oehlen about Pinault’s passion as a collector, and with the Bouroullec brothers, who created design features for the interiors and exteriors of the museum.

Augurs of Spring

Augurs of Spring

As spring approaches in the Northern Hemisphere, Sydney Stutterheim reflects on the iconography and symbolism of the season in art both past and present.

News

Photo: Chad Moore

Artist Spotlight

Urs Fischer

June 24–30, 2020

Urs Fischer mines the potential of materials—from clay, steel, and paint to bread, dirt, and produce—to create works that disorient and bewilder. Through scale distortions, illusion, and the juxtaposition of common objects, his paintings, sculptures, photographs, and large-scale installations explore themes of perception and representation while maintaining a witty irreverence and mordant humor.

Photo: Chad Moore