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Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Cindy and Dog Statue, 1983 Gelatin silver print, 10 × 8 inches (25.4 × 20.3 cm), edition of 25© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Cindy and Dog Statue, 1983

Gelatin silver print, 10 × 8 inches (25.4 × 20.3 cm), edition of 25
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Jennifer at the Rodeo, 1984 Gelatin silver print, 10 × 8 inches (25.4 × 20.3 cm), edition of 25© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Jennifer at the Rodeo, 1984

Gelatin silver print, 10 × 8 inches (25.4 × 20.3 cm), edition of 25
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Holding Virginia, 1989 Gelatin silver print, 24 × 20 inches (61 × 50.8 cm), edition of 25© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Holding Virginia, 1989

Gelatin silver print, 24 × 20 inches (61 × 50.8 cm), edition of 25
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Emmett Afloat, 1988 Gelatin silver print, 24 × 20 inches (61 × 50.8 cm), edition of 25© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Emmett Afloat, 1988

Gelatin silver print, 24 × 20 inches (61 × 50.8 cm), edition of 25
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Larry Shaving, 1991 Gelatin silver print, 24 × 20 inches (61 × 50.8 cm), edition of 25© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Larry Shaving, 1991

Gelatin silver print, 24 × 20 inches (61 × 50.8 cm), edition of 25
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Virginia, Untitled (Upper Field), 1993 Tea-toned gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 10© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Virginia, Untitled (Upper Field), 1993

Tea-toned gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 10
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Checkmark Windsor), 1998 Tea-toned gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 10© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Checkmark Windsor), 1998

Tea-toned gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 10
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Georgia, Untitled (Black Spot), 1996 Tea-toned gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 10© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Georgia, Untitled (Black Spot), 1996

Tea-toned gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 10
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Antietam (Cobweb), 2002 Varnished gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 5© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Antietam (Cobweb), 2002

Varnished gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 5
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Manassas (Home Field), 2001 Varnished gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 5© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Manassas (Home Field), 2001

Varnished gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 5
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Chancellorsville (Rever’s Turn), 2002 Varnished gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 5© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Chancellorsville (Rever’s Turn), 2002

Varnished gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 5
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Antietam (Spindly Trees), 2001 Varnished gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 5© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Antietam (Spindly Trees), 2001

Varnished gelatin silver print, 40 × 50 inches (101.6 × 127 cm), edition of 5
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Untitled, 2000 Gelatin silver print, 30 × 38 inches (76.2 × 96.5 cm), edition of 3© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Untitled, 2000

Gelatin silver print, 30 × 38 inches (76.2 × 96.5 cm), edition of 3
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Untitled, 2000 Gelatin silver print, 30 × 38 inches (76.2 × 96.5 cm), edition of 3© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Untitled, 2000

Gelatin silver print, 30 × 38 inches (76.2 × 96.5 cm), edition of 3
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Triptych, c. 2004 Varnished gelatin silver print, in 3 parts, overall: 50 × 120 inches (127 × 304.8 cm), edition of 8© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Triptych, c. 2004

Varnished gelatin silver print, in 3 parts, overall: 50 × 120 inches (127 × 304.8 cm), edition of 8
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Flamingo on Heart Base), 2012 Gelatin silver print, 16 × 20 inches (40.6 × 50.8 cm), edition of 3© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Flamingo on Heart Base), 2012

Gelatin silver print, 16 × 20 inches (40.6 × 50.8 cm), edition of 3
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Funnel Sculpture), 2012 Gelatin silver print, 20 × 24 inches (50.8 × 61 cm), edition of 3© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Funnel Sculpture), 2012

Gelatin silver print, 20 × 24 inches (50.8 × 61 cm), edition of 3
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Pale Detail), 1999–2000 Gelatin silver print, 16 × 20 inches (40.6 × 50.8 cm), edition of 3© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Pale Detail), 1999–2000

Gelatin silver print, 16 × 20 inches (40.6 × 50.8 cm), edition of 3
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Suitcase), 2011–2012 Platinum print, 9 × 14 inches (22.9 × 35.6 cm), edition of 3© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Suitcase), 2011–2012

Platinum print, 9 × 14 inches (22.9 × 35.6 cm), edition of 3
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Solitary Print on Wall), 2012 Inkjet print, 23 × 34 ¾ inches (58.4 × 88.3 cm), edition of 3© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Solitary Print on Wall), 2012

Inkjet print, 23 × 34 ¾ inches (58.4 × 88.3 cm), edition of 3
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Wall Drip with Blue Tape), 2012 Inkjet print, 16 × 24 inches (40.6 × 61 cm), edition of 3© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Remembered Light, Untitled (Wall Drip with Blue Tape), 2012

Inkjet print, 16 × 24 inches (40.6 × 61 cm), edition of 3
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Johnny Reb, 2004 Gelatin silver print, 15 × 13 ½ inches (38.1 × 34.3 cm), edition of 5© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Johnny Reb, 2004

Gelatin silver print, 15 × 13 ½ inches (38.1 × 34.3 cm), edition of 5
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Kingfisher’s Wing, 2007 Gelatin silver print, 15 × 13 ½ inches (38.1 × 34.3 cm), edition of 5© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Kingfisher’s Wing, 2007

Gelatin silver print, 15 × 13 ½ inches (38.1 × 34.3 cm), edition of 5
© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, The Nature of Loneliness, 2008 Gelatin silver print, 15 × 13 ½ inches (38.1 × 34.3 cm), edition of 5© Sally Mann

Sally Mann, The Nature of Loneliness, 2008

Gelatin silver print, 15 × 13 ½ inches (38.1 × 34.3 cm), edition of 5
© Sally Mann

About

Sally Mann was born in 1951 in Lexington, Virginia, and has always remained close to her roots. She has photographed in the American South since the 1970s, producing series on portraiture, architecture, landscape, and still life. She is perhaps best known for her intimate portraits of her family, including her young children and her husband, and for her evocative and resonant landscapes of in the American South. Her work has attracted controversy at times, but it has always been influential, and since the time of her first solo exhibition, at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC, in 1977, has attracted a wide audience.

Mann explored various genres as she was maturing in the 1970s: she produced landscapes and architectural photography, and she blended still life with elements of portraiture. But she truly found her métier with her second publication, a study of girlhood entitled At Twelve: Portraits of Young Women (Aperture, 1988). Between 1984 and 1994 she worked on the series Immediate Family (Aperture, 1992), which focuses on her three children, who were then all under the age of ten. While the series touches on ordinary moments in their daily lives—playing, sleeping, eating—it also speaks to larger themes such as death and cultural perceptions of sexuality. In Proud Flesh (Aperture and Gagosian Gallery, 2009), Mann turned the camera to her husband, Larry. Shot over a six-year period, this series of candid and frank portraits reverses traditional gender roles, capturing a male subject in moments of intimate vulnerability.

Mann has produced two major series of landscapes: Deep South (Bullfinch Press, 2005) and Mother Land (Edwynn Houk Gallery, 1997). In What Remains (Bullfinch Press, 2003), she assembled a five-part study of mortality, ranging from pictures of the decomposing body of her beloved greyhound to photographs of the site where an armed fugitive committed suicide on her property in the Shenandoah Valley in Virginia. She has often experimented with color photography, but she has remained most interested in black-and-white, especially photography’s antique technologies. She has long used an 8 x 10 bellows camera, and has explored platinum and bromoil printing processes. In the mid-1990s she began using the wet-plate collodion process to produce pictures that almost seem like hybrids of photography, painting, and sculpture.

A Guggenheim fellow and a three–time recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, Mann was named “America’s Best Photographer” by Time magazine in 2001. She has been the subject of two documentaries: Blood Ties (1994), which was nominated for an Academy Award, and What Remains (2007), which premiered at Sundance and was nominated for an Emmy for Best Documentary in 2008. Hold Still: A Memoir in Pictures (Little, Brown, 2015), received universal critical acclaim and was named a finalist for the National Book Award. In 2016 Hold Still won the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction.

Mann has been the subject of major exhibitions at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings was presented at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, in 2018 (traveling to the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Jeu de Paume, Paris; and High Museum of Art, Atlanta, through 2020); the exhibition features some 115 photographs, many of which have not been exhibited or published previously. Mann’s photographs can be found in many public and private collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

Mann lives and works in Lexington, Virginia.

Sally Mann

Photo: Annie Leibovitz

Website

sallymann.com

From the Quarterly

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Photo: Annie Leibovitz

Award

Sally Mann

Sally Mann will be honored at the annual Gordon Parks Foundation Awards Dinner and Auction in New York on May 22, 2018. The late Gordon Parks believed in the power of transforming lives through self-expression—primarily art. Mann has exemplified this model in her passion for capturing those she loves and the surrounding landscape that has defined her work.

Photo: Annie Leibovitz

Giuseppe Penone, Pelle di foglie—5 foglie a terra, 2011 © Giuseppe Penone

Art Fair

artgenève

February 1–4, 2018, booth B19
Palexpo, Geneva
www.artgeneve.ch

Gagosian is pleased to participate in artgenève 2018, presenting a selection of works by Richard Artschwager, Georg Baselitz, John Currin, Dadamaino, Edmund de Waal, Keith Haring, Damien Hirst, Peter Lindbergh, Vera Lutter, Man Ray, Sally Mann, Brice Marden, Olivier Mosset, Albert Oehlen, Steven Parrino, Giuseppe Penone, Sigmar Polke, Ed Ruscha, Blair Thurman, Tatiana Trouvé, Tom Wesselmann, Franz West, Rachel Whiteread, and others. If you wish to receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact us at geneva@gagosian.com. Tickets are available at www.artgeneve.ch.

Giuseppe Penone, Pelle di foglie—5 foglie a terra, 2011 © Giuseppe Penone

Patti Smith, Robert Mapplethorpe’s Slippers, NYC, 2002 © Patti Smith

Art Fair

Paris Photo 2017

November 9–12, 2017, booth B16
Grand Palais, Paris
www.parisphoto.com

Patti Smith, an internationally acclaimed musician, writer, and visual artist, has chosen a selection of her own photographs to be shown alongside works by other artists including Richard Avedon, Balthus, Gregory Crewdson, Peter Lindbergh, Vera Lutter, Sally Mann, Taryn Simon, Deborah Turbeville, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol. Smith began taking photographs in 1978, eventually developing an emotionally unfiltered archive of solitary moments, to which she is continually adding. Her lifelong fascination with eulogy and remembrance is reflected in her selection of works by other artists. “Curated by Patti Smith” provides a glimpse of Smith and her fellow travelers, and is a coming-together of people, places, and relics.

Patti Smith, Robert Mapplethorpe’s Slippers, NYC, 2002 © Patti Smith

Museum Exhibitions

Sally Mann, Bean’s Bottom, 1991 © Sally Mann

Opening Soon

Sally Mann
A Thousand Crossings

November 16, 2018–February 10, 2019
J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
www.getty.edu

For more than forty years Sally Mann has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work, including figure studies, still lifes, and landscapes. This exhibition, with more than a hundred photographs, many of which have never been exhibited, explores how her relationship with the South has shaped her work. This exhibition originated at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Sally Mann, Bean’s Bottom, 1991 © Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Fontainebleau), 1998, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC © Sally Mann

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Sally Mann
A Thousand Crossings

June 30–September 23, 2018
Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts
www.pem.org

For more than forty years Sally Mann has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work, including figure studies, still lifes, and landscapes. This exhibition, with more than a hundred photographs, many of which have never been exhibited, explores how her relationship with the South has shaped her work. This exhibition has traveled from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Fontainebleau), 1998, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC © Sally Mann

Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, 2006 © Gregory Crewdson

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New Territory
Landscape Photography Today

June 24–September 16, 2018
Denver Art Museum
denverartmuseum.org

This exhibition will survey contemporary landscape photography from around the world. More than eighty photographs will gauge how artists stretch the boundaries of traditional landscape photography to reflect the environmental attitudes, perceptions, and values of our time. Work by Gregory Crewdson and Sally Mann will be included.

Gregory Crewdson, Untitled, 2006 © Gregory Crewdson

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Fredericksburg (Cedar Trees), 2001 © Sally Mann

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Sally Mann
A Thousand Crossings

March 4–May 28, 2018
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
www.nga.gov

For more than forty years Sally Mann has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work including figure studies, still lifes, and landscapes. This exhibition, with more than a hundred photographs, many of which have never been exhibited, explores how her relationship with the South has shaped her work.

Sally Mann, Battlefields, Fredericksburg (Cedar Trees), 2001 © Sally Mann

See all Museum Exhibitions for Sally Mann