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Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, WIDW. HELIOS (7058)., 2019 Acrylic, oil, elastic, cardboard, and treated fabric on canvas, framed: 73 ¾ × 53 ¾ × 3 ¼ inches (187.3 × 136.5 × 8.3 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, WIDW. HELIOS (7058)., 2019

Acrylic, oil, elastic, cardboard, and treated fabric on canvas, framed: 73 ¾ × 53 ¾ × 3 ¼ inches (187.3 × 136.5 × 8.3 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, HEART (6709), 2018 Ceramic, 20 ½ × 14 × 2 inches (52.1 × 35.6 × 5.1 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, HEART (6709), 2018

Ceramic, 20 ½ × 14 × 2 inches (52.1 × 35.6 × 5.1 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, ACTS/FERRYDUST, 2018 Clear urethane block, dye, wood, spray paint, and laminate, 40 ½ × 25 × 12 inches (102.9 × 63.5 × 30.5 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, ACTS/FERRYDUST, 2018

Clear urethane block, dye, wood, spray paint, and laminate, 40 ½ × 25 × 12 inches (102.9 × 63.5 × 30.5 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Basin Theology/STYX BOAT, 2017 Ceramic, 26 × 46 × 74 inches (66 × 116.8 × 188 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Basin Theology/STYX BOAT, 2017

Ceramic, 26 × 46 × 74 inches (66 × 116.8 × 188 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, HOT FLAT LIGHT, 2017 Acrylic, oil, elastic, and cardboard on canvas, framed: 59 × 45 ½ inches (149.9 × 115.6 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, HOT FLAT LIGHT, 2017

Acrylic, oil, elastic, and cardboard on canvas, framed: 59 × 45 ½ inches (149.9 × 115.6 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Installation view, Sterling Ruby: STOVES, Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature, Paris, October 21, 2015–February 14, 2016 Artwork © Sterling Ruby

Installation view, Sterling Ruby: STOVES, Musée de la Chasse et de la Nature, Paris, October 21, 2015–February 14, 2016

Artwork © Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, DEEP FLAG (5532), 2015 Bleached fleece and elastic, 174 ½ × 316 inches (443.2 × 802.6 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, DEEP FLAG (5532), 2015

Bleached fleece and elastic, 174 ½ × 316 inches (443.2 × 802.6 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, DRAG (BANKER), 2015 Steel, engine blocks, and paint, 51 ½ × 145 × 74 ¼ inches (130.8 × 368.3 × 188.6 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, DRAG (BANKER), 2015

Steel, engine blocks, and paint, 51 ½ × 145 × 74 ¼ inches (130.8 × 368.3 × 188.6 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, SP288, 2014 Spray paint on synthetic canvas, 96 × 84 inches (243.8 × 213.4 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, SP288, 2014

Spray paint on synthetic canvas, 96 × 84 inches (243.8 × 213.4 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, FLAG (4791), 2014 Bleached and dyed canvas, denim, and elastic, 174 ½ × 343 inches (443.2 × 871.2 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, FLAG (4791), 2014

Bleached and dyed canvas, denim, and elastic, 174 ½ × 343 inches (443.2 × 871.2 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, The Cup, 2013 Foam, urethane, wood, and spray paint, 92 × 115 ½ × 88 inches (233.7 × 293.4 × 223.5 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, The Cup, 2013

Foam, urethane, wood, and spray paint, 92 × 115 ½ × 88 inches (233.7 × 293.4 × 223.5 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, SCALE (4586), 2013 Steel, paint, cardboard, yarn, and mixed media, 97 × 75 × 70 inches (246.4 × 190.5 × 177.8 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, SCALE (4586), 2013

Steel, paint, cardboard, yarn, and mixed media, 97 × 75 × 70 inches (246.4 × 190.5 × 177.8 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Stove 3, 2013 Stainless steel, 54 ¾ × 14 × 33 inches (139.1 × 35.6 × 83.8 cm), edition of 6 + 2 AP© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Stove 3, 2013

Stainless steel, 54 ¾ × 14 × 33 inches (139.1 × 35.6 × 83.8 cm), edition of 6 + 2 AP
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, EXHM (3916), 2012 Collage, paint, and urethane on cardboard, 98 × 97 inches (248.9 × 246.4 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, EXHM (3916), 2012

Collage, paint, and urethane on cardboard, 98 × 97 inches (248.9 × 246.4 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, SCXV3ST/BD, 2012 Fiberglass, wood, spray paint, and formica, in 2 parts, drop: 84 × 19 × 19 inches (213.4 × 48.3 × 48.3 cm), pedestal: 36 × 34 × 34 inches (91.4 × 86.4 × 86.4 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, SCXV3ST/BD, 2012

Fiberglass, wood, spray paint, and formica, in 2 parts, drop: 84 × 19 × 19 inches (213.4 × 48.3 × 48.3 cm), pedestal: 36 × 34 × 34 inches (91.4 × 86.4 × 86.4 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, CDCR, 2011 PVC pipe, foam, urethane, wood, and spray paint, 64 × 240 × 66 ½ inches (162.6 × 609.6 × 168.9 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, CDCR, 2011

PVC pipe, foam, urethane, wood, and spray paint, 64 × 240 × 66 ½ inches (162.6 × 609.6 × 168.9 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, VAMPIRE 47, 2011 Fabric and fiberfill, 84 × 45 × 4 inches (213.4 × 114.3 × 10.2 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, VAMPIRE 47, 2011

Fabric and fiberfill, 84 × 45 × 4 inches (213.4 × 114.3 × 10.2 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, SP137, 2010 Spray paint on canvas, 125 × 185 inches (317.5 × 469.9 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, SP137, 2010

Spray paint on canvas, 125 × 185 inches (317.5 × 469.9 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Brass Ketamine User, 2010 Ceramic, 15 × 27 × 14 inches (38.1 × 68.6 × 35.6 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Brass Ketamine User, 2010

Ceramic, 15 × 27 × 14 inches (38.1 × 68.6 × 35.6 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, ACTS/KKDETHZ, 2009 Clear urethane block, dye, wood, spray paint, and formica, in 2 parts, overall: 60 ½ × 62 ½ × 34 inches (153.7 × 158.8 × 86.4 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, ACTS/KKDETHZ, 2009

Clear urethane block, dye, wood, spray paint, and formica, in 2 parts, overall: 60 ½ × 62 ½ × 34 inches (153.7 × 158.8 × 86.4 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Big Grid/DB Deth, 2008 Formica, spray paint, and wood, 84 × 84 × 36 inches (213.4 × 213.4 × 91.4 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Big Grid/DB Deth, 2008

Formica, spray paint, and wood, 84 × 84 × 36 inches (213.4 × 213.4 × 91.4 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Balanced Stack of Pottery and Knife, 2005 Collage on paper, 28 × 22 ½ inches (71.1 × 57.2 cm)© Sterling Ruby

Sterling Ruby, Balanced Stack of Pottery and Knife, 2005

Collage on paper, 28 × 22 ½ inches (71.1 × 57.2 cm)
© Sterling Ruby

About

Sterling Ruby’s work engages with issues related to autobiography, art history, and the violence and pressures within society. Employing diverse aesthetic strategies and mediums—including sculpture, drawing, collage, ceramics, painting, and video—he examines the tensions between fluidity and stasis, Expressionism and Minimalism, the abject and the pristine.

Born on Bitburg Air Base, Germany, to an American father and a Dutch mother, Ruby moved at a young age to the United States, where he grew up on a farm in southeastern Pennsylvania. There he encountered Amish quilt-making and Pennsylvania redware pottery, both of which directly inspired his initial forays into garment-making, soft sculpture, and ceramics. Ruby graduated from the Pennsylvania College of Art and Design, Lancaster, in 1996. He received a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2002, followed by an MFA from the ArtCenter College of Design, Pasadena, California, in 2005.

Living and working in Los Angeles, Ruby draws endless inspiration from the city’s physical and conceptual landscape. A subseries of the SP paintings (2007–14), the VIVIDS (2014), are electric color fields inspired by the shifting, multihued skies that he encounters on his way to the studio, while the SUBMARINE (2015) and TABLES (2015 –19) series were created from hulking industrial parts sourced nearby. Ruby’s work often deals with the ways in which acts of defacement, like urban demarcation and graffiti, can produce a painterly sublime. Both in his YARD paintings (2015–16) and in his WIDW paintings (2016–), he taps into the speed and motion of collage, incorporating bleached fabric and cardboard scraps and combining abstract color fields with fragments of studio refuse. Continually pushing the boundaries between artistic mediums, Ruby launched a ready-to-wear clothing line in 2019.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Installation view, American Pastoral, Gagosian, Britannia Street, London, January 23–March 14, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Adam McEwen, Thomas Moran, © Richard Prince, © Banks Violette, © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Tour

American Pastoral

Thursday, March 5, 2020, 6:30pm
Gagosian, Britannia Street, London

Join Gagosian for a tour of the group exhibition American Pastoral. The show juxtaposes modern and contemporary works with historical American landscapes ranging from Albert Bierstadt’s depiction of the sublime in Sunset over the River (1877) to Edward Hopper’s tranquil seaside scene, Gloucester Harbor (1926). Gagosian’s Alice Godwin will focus on a select grouping of exhibited works that seek to challenge the idealized vision of the American Dream that has long been a rich topic of inquiry for artists in the United States. To attend the free event, RSVP to londontours@gagosian.com. Space is limited.

Installation view, American Pastoral, Gagosian, Britannia Street, London, January 23–March 14, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Adam McEwen, Thomas Moran, © Richard Prince, © Banks Violette, © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Chris Burden, How to Shrink L.A., 1999 © 2020 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Art Fair

Frieze Los Angeles 2020
How to Shrink L.A.

February 14–16, 2020, booth C06
Paramount Picture Studios, Los Angeles
frieze.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Frieze Los Angeles 2020. Taking Los Angeles’s system of highways as a literal and figurative backdrop, the selection includes Richard Prince’s full-scale car sculpture Untitled (2008) and Chris Burden’s ominously oversize L.A.P.D. Uniform (1993). The booth also includes work by Jean-Michel Basquiat, John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, Theaster Gates, Piero Golia, Alex Israel, Sally Mann, Adam McEwen, Cady Noland, Sterling Ruby, Ed Ruscha, Taryn Simon, Robert Therrien, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, and others.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works in the booth, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at frieze.com.

Download the full press release (PDF)

Chris Burden, How to Shrink L.A., 1999 © 2020 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Omen, 1980 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Art Fair

artgenève 2020

January 30–February 2, 2020, booth B25
Palexpo, Geneva
artgeneve.ch

Gagosian is pleased to participate in artgenève 2020, with modern and contemporary works by Davide Balula, Georg Baselitz, Helen Frankenthaler, Simon Hantaï, Damien Hirst, Grant Levy-Lucero, Henri Matisse, Olivier Mosset, Giuseppe Penone, Pablo Picasso, David Reed, Sterling Ruby, Spencer Sweeney, and Tom Wesselmann, among others.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artgeneve.ch.

Download the full press release in English (PDF) or French (PDF)

Helen Frankenthaler, Omen, 1980 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Sterling Ruby, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, February 26–May 26, 2020. Artwork © Sterling Ruby

On View

Sterling Ruby

Through May 26, 2020
Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston
www.icaboston.org

Since his earliest works, Sterling Ruby has investigated the role of the artist as an outsider. Critiquing the structures of modernism and traditional institutions, he addresses the repressed underpinnings of contemporary culture and the coding of power and violence. This exhibition features more than one hundred works in an array of mediums spanning more than two decades of his practice. This show has traveled from the Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami.

Installation view, Sterling Ruby, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, February 26–May 26, 2020. Artwork © Sterling Ruby

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

On View

Making Knowing
Craft in Art, 1950–2019

November 22, 2019–January 2021
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

Making Knowing: Craft in Art, 1950–2019 foregrounds how visual artists have explored the materials, methods, and strategies of craft over the past seven decades. Some expand techniques with long histories, such as weaving, sewing, or pottery, while others experiment with clay, beads, and glass, among other mediums. Work by Richard Artschwager, Mike Kelley, Shio Kusaka, and Sterling Ruby is included.

Shio Kusaka, (line 5), 2010 © Shio Kusaka

Sterling Ruby, ACTS/WS ROLLIN, 2011, Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Closed

Sterling Ruby

November 7, 2019–February 2, 2020
Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami
icamiami.org

Since his earliest works, Sterling Ruby has investigated the role of the artist as an outsider. Critiquing the structures of modernism and traditional institutions, he addresses the repressed underpinnings of contemporary culture and the coding of power and violence. This exhibition features more than one hundred works in an array of mediums spanning more than two decades of his practice. This show will travel to the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, in February.

Sterling Ruby, ACTS/WS ROLLIN, 2011, Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Robert Wedemeyer

Sterling Ruby, BASKET (6111), 2016 © Sterling Ruby

Closed

Strange

August 21, 2019–January 19, 2020
University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
bampfa.org

A century after the Surrealist movement exploded across the global cultural scene, celebrating the improbable, uncanny, and mysterious, the “strange” remains a source of fascination and artistic inspiration today. Strange features works from Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive’s collection that invoke strangeness and resonate with the spirit of Surrealism. Work by Sterling Ruby and Cindy Sherman is included.

Sterling Ruby, BASKET (6111), 2016 © Sterling Ruby

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Press

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