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Zeng Fanzhi

Zeng Fanzhi, Haircut, 1989 Oil on canvas, 39 ⅜ × 27 ⅝ inches (100 × 70 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Haircut, 1989

Oil on canvas, 39 ⅜ × 27 ⅝ inches (100 × 70 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Artist and Model No. 2, 1989 Oil on canvas, 46 ⅛ × 32 ¾ inches (117 × 83 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Artist and Model No. 2, 1989

Oil on canvas, 46 ⅛ × 32 ¾ inches (117 × 83 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Hospital Triptych No. 1, 1991 Oil on canvas, in 3 parts, overall: 70 ⅞ × 181 ⅞ inches (180 × 460 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Hospital Triptych No. 1, 1991

Oil on canvas, in 3 parts, overall: 70 ⅞ × 181 ⅞ inches (180 × 460 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Man and Meat, 1993 Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 78 ¾ inches (180 × 200 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Man and Meat, 1993

Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 78 ¾ inches (180 × 200 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Mask Series No. 8, 1997 Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 78 ¾ inches (180 × 200 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Mask Series No. 8, 1997

Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 78 ¾ inches (180 × 200 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, The Death of Marat, 2001 Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 59 ⅛ inches (180 × 150 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, The Death of Marat, 2001

Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 59 ⅛ inches (180 × 150 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, We No. 9, 2002 Oil on canvas, in 3 parts, overall: 86 ⅝ × 259 ⅞ inches (220 × 660 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, We No. 9, 2002

Oil on canvas, in 3 parts, overall: 86 ⅝ × 259 ⅞ inches (220 × 660 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Portrait, 2004 Oil on canvas, 78 ¾ × 59 ⅛ inches (200 × 150 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Portrait, 2004

Oil on canvas, 78 ¾ × 59 ⅛ inches (200 × 150 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Covered Lamb, 2009 Golden silk nanmu wood, 43 ⅜ × 27 ⅝ × 21 ⅝ inches (110 × 70 × 55 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Covered Lamb, 2009

Golden silk nanmu wood, 43 ⅜ × 27 ⅝ × 21 ⅝ inches (110 × 70 × 55 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Artist Series Lucian Freud, 2011 Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 70 ⅞ inches (180 × 180 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Artist Series Lucian Freud, 2011

Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 70 ⅞ inches (180 × 180 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Artist Series Self-Portrait, 2011 Oil on canvas, 59 ⅛ × 39 ⅜ inches (150 × 100 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Artist Series Self-Portrait, 2011

Oil on canvas, 59 ⅛ × 39 ⅜ inches (150 × 100 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, The Christ Child, 2012 Oil on canvas, 59 × 59 inches (150 × 150 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, The Christ Child, 2012

Oil on canvas, 59 × 59 inches (150 × 150 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Jing Hu Xi Liu, 2012 Pencil on paper, 19 ¾ × 27 ⅝ inches (50 × 70 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Jing Hu Xi Liu, 2012

Pencil on paper, 19 ¾ × 27 ⅝ inches (50 × 70 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Self-Portrait, 2013 Oil on canvas, 114 ¼ × 114 ¼ inches (290 × 290 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Self-Portrait, 2013

Oil on canvas, 114 ¼ × 114 ¼ inches (290 × 290 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Untitled, 2015 Cast silver, 102 ⅜ × 76 × 20 ½ inches (260 × 193 × 52 cm), edition of 5© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Untitled, 2015

Cast silver, 102 ⅜ × 76 × 20 ½ inches (260 × 193 × 52 cm), edition of 5
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Blue, 2015 Oil on canvas, in 3 parts, overall: 157 ½ × 275 ⅝ inches (400 × 700 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Blue, 2015

Oil on canvas, in 3 parts, overall: 157 ½ × 275 ⅝ inches (400 × 700 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Untitled, 2015 Oil on canvas, in 2 parts, overall: 78 ¾ × 315 inches (200 × 800 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Untitled, 2015

Oil on canvas, in 2 parts, overall: 78 ¾ × 315 inches (200 × 800 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Lucian Freud, 2017 Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 70 ⅞ inches (180 × 180 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, Lucian Freud, 2017

Oil on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 70 ⅞ inches (180 × 180 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, 8, 2018 Oil on canvas, 47 ¼ × 47 ¼ inches (120 × 120 cm)© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

Zeng Fanzhi, 8, 2018

Oil on canvas, 47 ¼ × 47 ¼ inches (120 × 120 cm)
© Zeng Fanzhi Studio

About

Zeng Fanzhi’s visually and historically complex paintings reflect his bold experimentation with, and fusion of, Eastern and Western artistic traditions.

Born and raised in Wuhan, China, Zeng graduated from the Hubei Institute of Fine Arts, Wuhan, in 1991. From the nineteenth century until the 1990s, Wuhan was one of China’s most prosperous cities and witness to a collision of Western and Eastern cultures. During his youth Zeng was inspired by China’s ’85 New Wave movement, which saw artists search for a new, often more conceptual, language after the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and 1970s. Zeng closely followed and studied Western art and was particularly drawn to German Expressionism and French Romanticism, through which he observed the ways in which his predecessors processed and visualized their experiences during times of extreme societal flux. He was especially drawn to the bold expressive gestures of Max Beckmann, as well as artists such as Willem de Kooning and Edvard Munch. These influences led him to deviate from the Social Realism that he was taught in school. Instead, he keenly observed objects and images from daily life. His Hospital (1991–92) and Meat (1992–94) paintings are examples of this turn. In these visceral works, he painted the skin of his subjects a pinkish color resembling slaughtered meat, demonstrating his concern and compassion for human existence and fragility.

In 1993 Zeng relocated to Beijing, where the unfamiliar environment left him feeling isolated. During this time he became keenly aware of the people he encountered, from all walks of life, who were living through a period of rapid modernization. This awareness led to the creation of his Mask works (1994–2004), a series that preserved the large, vacant eyes and thick, clumsy hands of the subjects seen in prior paintings and introduced greater distance between the figures, creating a sense of alienation. The masks in these works obscure and divert from the subjects’ feelings and hint at Zeng’s apprehension toward and rejection of society’s accelerated, systematic development. These works not only provide a record of this period of profound social transformation, but also offer a glimpse of the collective memory of this era.

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Zeng Fanzhi

Photo: courtesy Zeng Fanzhi

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Artwork by Zeng Fanzhi on view at Space Z, Beijing. Artwork © Zeng Fanzhi

Visit

Zeng Fanzhi
Space Z

Opened in November 2022, Space Z is a long-term experimental project created by Zeng Fanzhi within his studio in Beijing. The space showcases artwork in a range of different media by Zeng as well as by other artists. Through the selection, placement, and examination of work in the space—which is open by appointment and presented online through WeChat and Instagram—Zeng seeks to explore new modes of creation, viewing, and thinking.

Artwork by Zeng Fanzhi on view at Space Z, Beijing. Artwork © Zeng Fanzhi

Gagosian’s booth at West Bund Art & Design 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Adam McEwen, © Roe Ethridge, © Alex Israel, © Harmony Korine. Photo: JJYPHOTO

Art Fair

West Bund Art & Design 2022

November 11–13, 2022, booth A102
West Bund Art Center, Shanghai
westbundshanghai.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in the ninth edition of West Bund Art & Design. The gallery will present new works made for the fair by Georg Baselitz, Roe Ethridge, Thomas Houseago, Alex Israel, Harmony Korine, Adam McEwen, Jim Shaw, Alexandria Smith, Spencer Sweeney, and Tatiana Trouvé, alongside works by Ashley Bickerton, Urs Fischer, Katharina Grosse, Damien Hirst, Takashi Murakami, Nam June Paik, Richard Prince, Ugo Rondinone, Ed Ruscha, Richard Wright, and Zeng Fanzhi.

Gagosian’s booth at West Bund Art & Design 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Adam McEwen, © Roe Ethridge, © Alex Israel, © Harmony Korine. Photo: JJYPHOTO

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Hong Kong 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Georg Baselitz; © Louise Bonnet; © Zeng Fanzhi; © 2019 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved; © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Martin Wong

Art Fair

Art Basel Hong Kong 2022

May 27–29, 2022, booth 1C15
Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre
www.artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel Hong Kong 2022 with an ensemble of contemporary works by international artists. The gallery’s presentation will feature works by artists including Georg BaselitzLouise BonnetEdmund de WaalUrs FischerKatharina GrosseMark GrotjahnJennifer GuidiSimon HantaïHao LiangDamien HirstThomas HouseagoTetsuya IshidaAlex IsraelEwa JuszkiewiczRick LoweTakashi MurakamiAlbert OehlenNam June PaikGiuseppe PenoneRudolf PolanszkySterling RubyEd RuschaJenny SavilleJim ShawRudolf StingelSpencer SweeneyRachel Whiteread, and Zeng Fanzhi.

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Hong Kong 2022. Artwork, left to right: © Georg Baselitz; © Louise Bonnet; © Zeng Fanzhi; © 2019 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved; © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Martin Wong

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Museum Exhibitions

Hao Liang, Eight Views of Xiaoxiang—Snowscape, 2014–15 © Hao Liang. Photo: courtesy UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing

On View

Duration
Chinese Art in Transformation

Opened September 25, 2020
Minsheng Art Museum, Beijing
www.msam.cn

Duration: Chinese Art in Transformation attempts to show how every moment that stretches is an absorption of the past, and the endless possibilities of the future are based on the past and the present. The exhibition presents painting, sculpture, installation, video, animation, and more from the 1970s to the present. Work by Hao Liang, Jia Aili, and Zeng Fanzhi is included.

Hao Liang, Eight Views of Xiaoxiang—Snowscape, 2014–15 © Hao Liang. Photo: courtesy UCCA Center for Contemporary Art, Beijing

Zeng Fanzhi, Van Gogh III, 2017 © Zeng Fanzhi

Closed

Zeng Fanzhi | Van Gogh

October 20, 2017–March 5, 2018
Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam
www.vangoghmuseum.nl

This show marks the first time the Van Gogh Museum has invited a contemporary Asian artist to exhibit at the institution. Zeng Fanzhi, who has been inspired by the artist, presents new never-before-exhibited paintings that refer to works by Van Gogh in the museum’s collection, creating a dialogue between modern and contemporary art. The show was extended to accommodate the addition of a new painting.

Zeng Fanzhi, Van Gogh III, 2017 © Zeng Fanzhi

Press

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