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Andy Warhol

Late Paintings

February 26–April 17, 2004
Beverly Hills

Andy Warhol, Be a Somebody with a Body (2 Times), c. 1985–86 Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 116 × 212 inches (294.6 × 538.5 cm)

Andy Warhol, Be a Somebody with a Body (2 Times), c. 1985–86

Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 116 × 212 inches (294.6 × 538.5 cm)

Andy Warhol, Repent and Sin No More (neg), 1985–86 Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 80 × 72 inches (203.2 × 182.9 cm)

Andy Warhol, Repent and Sin No More (neg), 1985–86

Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 80 × 72 inches (203.2 × 182.9 cm)

Andy Warhol, Art (pos), 1986 Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 16 × 20 inches (40.6 × 50.8 cm)

Andy Warhol, Art (pos), 1986

Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 16 × 20 inches (40.6 × 50.8 cm)

Andy Warhol, Mineola Motorcycle (pos), 1985–86 Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 16 × 20 inches (40.6 × 50.8 cm)

Andy Warhol, Mineola Motorcycle (pos), 1985–86

Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 16 × 20 inches (40.6 × 50.8 cm)

Andy Warhol, Camouflage Last Supper, 1986 Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 80 ¾ × 305 ½ inches (205.1 × 776 cm)

Andy Warhol, Camouflage Last Supper, 1986

Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 80 ¾ × 305 ½ inches (205.1 × 776 cm)

About

Gagosian Gallery is pleased to announce the exhibition of Andy Warhol's Late Paintings – primarily the stark black-and-white ad paintings from the mid-1980s.

For this group of works, Warhol returned to his scrapbooks of ads from the 1950s and chose those with hand painted illustrations and lettering. The works – which feature images that have been enlarged and screened on blank white canvases – are both brash and icy. While the images are made by hand, the paintings seem totally blank and disembodied.

In fact, the paintings are so emphatically dry in appearance they seem to suggest that, if pushed any farther, they might simply vanish. In short – to mimic one of the slogans – the paintings are just "one breath away" from returning to their abstract essence.

Around the same time, Warhol was making his Camouflage paintings – vivid designs that are really about the notion of making things disappear, and his black and white Rorschach works – inky blotches intended to communicate with "the other world" of our deepest psyche.

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