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Imageless Icons: Abstract Thoughts

February 3–March 26, 2005
Britannia Street, London

Richard Artschwager, Swivel, 1964 Formica on wood, 53 ⅜ × 25 ½ × 30 ¾ inches (135.6 × 64.8 × 78.1 cm)

Richard Artschwager, Swivel, 1964

Formica on wood, 53 ⅜ × 25 ½ × 30 ¾ inches (135.6 × 64.8 × 78.1 cm)

Willem de Kooning, Untitled XXVIII, 1983 Oil on canvas, 88 × 77 inches (223.5 × 195.6 cm)

Willem de Kooning, Untitled XXVIII, 1983

Oil on canvas, 88 × 77 inches (223.5 × 195.6 cm)

Donald Judd, Untitled, 1976 Copper, 6 × 29 × 24 inches (15.2 × 73.7 × 61 cm)

Donald Judd, Untitled, 1976

Copper, 6 × 29 × 24 inches (15.2 × 73.7 × 61 cm)

Gerhard Richter, Untitled, 1970 Oil on canvas, 39 ½ × 38 ¾ inches (100.3 × 98.4 cm)

Gerhard Richter, Untitled, 1970

Oil on canvas, 39 ½ × 38 ¾ inches (100.3 × 98.4 cm)

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome), 1977 Painted resin, 66 × 8 ½ × 6 ⅜ inches (167.6 × 21.6 × 16.2 cm), edition of 6

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome), 1977

Painted resin, 66 × 8 ½ × 6 ⅜ inches (167.6 × 21.6 × 16.2 cm), edition of 6

About

Gagosian is pleased to present an exhibition of rarely seen masterpieces of international abstract art at the new space on Britannia Street. The show will offer an opportunity to view exceptional works from throughout the twentieth century, on loan from private collections in Europe and America.

The idea of abstract painting and sculpture is to create an object without reference to the world outside, or with a strictly vestigial image or form. The artists in this exhibition have each pursued abstraction of a unique and individual character within the twentieth-century tradition of modernism, paying particular attention to material and color, to scale and handling. This exhibition aims to show these exceptional works in sympathetic relationships to each other, in spaces with ideal light and proportions, without imposing a theme or arbitrary construct to link them.

Artists included in this exhibition: Carl Andre, Richard Artschwager, Francis Bacon, Willem de Kooning, Walter De Maria, Damien Hirst, Donald Judd, Franz Kline, Roy Lichtenstein, Kazimir Malevich, Brice Marden, Agnes Martin, Blinky Palermo, Liubov Popova, Ad Reinhardt, Gerhard Richter, Mark Rothko, Robert Ryman, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Clyfford Still, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol

A fully illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition.

Gerhard Richter, Uncle Rudi, 1965, oil on canvas, 34 ¼ × 19 ¾ inches (87 × 50 cm), CR: 85

Gerhard Richter: Young Gerd

Richard Calvocoressi reflects on the monochrome world of Gerhard Richter’s early photo paintings.

Alexander Calder poster for McGovern, 1972, lithograph

The Art History of Presidential Campaign Posters

Against the backdrop of the 2020 US presidential election, historian Hal Wert takes us through the artistic and political evolution of American campaign posters, from their origin in 1844 to the present. In an interview with Quarterly editor Gillian Jakab, Wert highlights an array of landmark posters and the artists who made them.

Allen Midgette in front of the Chelsea Hotel, New York, 2000. Photo: Rita Barros

I’ll Be Your Mirror: Allen Midgette

Raymond Foye speaks with the actor who impersonated Andy Warhol during the great Warhol lecture hoax in the late 1960s. The two also discuss Midgette’s earlier film career in Italy and the difficulty of performing in a Warhol film.

Dorothy Lichtenstein in Roy Lichtenstein’s Southampton studio. Photo by Kasia Wandycz/Paris Match via Getty Images

In Conversation
Dorothy Lichtenstein

Dorothy Lichtenstein sits down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the changes underway at the Lichtenstein Foundation, life in the 1960s, and what brought her to—and kept her in—the Hamptons.

Brice Marden: Sketchbook (Gagosian, 2019); Lee Lozano: Notebooks 1967–70 (Primary Information, 2010); Stanley Whitney: Sketchbook (Lisson Gallery, 2018); Kara Walker: MCMXCIX (ROMA, 2017); Louis Fratino,Sept ’18–Jan. ’19 (Sikkema Jenkins & Co., 2019); Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Notebooks (Princeton University Press, 2015); Keith Haring Journals (Penguin Classics Deluxe Edition, 2010).

Book Corner
Private Pages Made Public

Megan N. Liberty explores artists’ engagement with notebooks and diaries, thinking through the various meanings that arise when these private ledgers become public.

Andy Warhol catalogue. Philadelphia: Institute of Contemporary Art, 1965.

Book Corner
On Collecting with Norman Diekman

Rare-book expert Douglas Flamm speaks with designer Norman Diekman about his unique collection of books on art and architecture. Diekman describes his first plunge into book collecting, the history behind it, and the way his passion for collecting grew.