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Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Black Flowers, 1961 Oil on canvas, 70 × 48 inches (177.8 × 121.9 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Black Flowers, 1961

Oil on canvas, 70 × 48 inches (177.8 × 121.9 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Masterpiece, 1962 Oil on canvas, 54 × 54 inches (137 × 137 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Masterpiece, 1962

Oil on canvas, 54 × 54 inches (137 × 137 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Happy Tears, 1964 Oil and Magna on canvas, 38 × 38 inches (97 × 97 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Happy Tears, 1964

Oil and Magna on canvas, 38 × 38 inches (97 × 97 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Compositions III, 1965 Magna on canvas, 56 × 48 inches (142.2 × 121.9 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Compositions III, 1965

Magna on canvas, 56 × 48 inches (142.2 × 121.9 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Peace through Chemistry, 1970 Oil and Magna on canvas, 100 × 180 inches (254 × 457.2 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Peace through Chemistry, 1970

Oil and Magna on canvas, 100 × 180 inches (254 × 457.2 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Cape Cod Still Life II, 1973 Oil and Magna on canvas, 60 × 74 inches (152.4 × 188 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Cape Cod Still Life II, 1973

Oil and Magna on canvas, 60 × 74 inches (152.4 × 188 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature, 1974 Magna, sand, Magna medium, and aluminum powder on canvas, 60 × 100 inches (152.4 × 254 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature, 1974

Magna, sand, Magna medium, and aluminum powder on canvas, 60 × 100 inches (152.4 × 254 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Mirror II (maquette), 1977 Painted wood, 59 ¾ × 30 × 12 inches (151.8 × 76.2 × 30.5 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Mirror II (maquette), 1977

Painted wood, 59 ¾ × 30 × 12 inches (151.8 × 76.2 × 30.5 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Expressionist Head, 1980 Painted and patinated bronze with painted wooden base, 55 × 41 × 18 inches (139.7 × 104.1 × 45.7 cm), edition of 6© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Expressionist Head, 1980

Painted and patinated bronze with painted wooden base, 55 × 41 × 18 inches (139.7 × 104.1 × 45.7 cm), edition of 6
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, The White Tree, 1980 Oil and Magna on canvas, 105 × 210 inches (266.7 × 533.4 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, The White Tree, 1980

Oil and Magna on canvas, 105 × 210 inches (266.7 × 533.4 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Sunrise Over Water, 1982 Oil and Magna on canvas, 66 × 112 inches (167.6 × 284.5 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Sunrise Over Water, 1982

Oil and Magna on canvas, 66 × 112 inches (167.6 × 284.5 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Abstract Painting, 1983 Oil and Magna on canvas, 70 × 54 inches (177.8 × 137.2 cm)© Roy Lichtenstein Foundation

Roy Lichtenstein, Abstract Painting, 1983

Oil and Magna on canvas, 70 × 54 inches (177.8 × 137.2 cm)
© Roy Lichtenstein Foundation

Roy Lichtenstein, replica of Greene Street Mural, 1983 (destroyed) Magna, printed paper, and tape on wall, 18 feet × 95 feet 8 inches (5.5 × 29.2 m), installed at Gagosian, West 24th Street, New York, September 10–October 17, 2015© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, replica of Greene Street Mural, 1983 (destroyed)

Magna, printed paper, and tape on wall, 18 feet × 95 feet 8 inches (5.5 × 29.2 m), installed at Gagosian, West 24th Street, New York, September 10–October 17, 2015
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Profile Head, 1988 Painted and patinated bronze, 36 ⅝ × 22 ½ × 9 ½ inches (93 × 57.2 × 24.1 cm), edition of 6© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Profile Head, 1988

Painted and patinated bronze, 36 ⅝ × 22 ½ × 9 ½ inches (93 × 57.2 × 24.1 cm), edition of 6
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Mobile III, 1990 Painted and patinated bronze, 57 × 52 × 13 inches (144.8 × 132.1 × 33 cm), edition of 6© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. Photo: Rob McKeever

Roy Lichtenstein, Mobile III, 1990

Painted and patinated bronze, 57 × 52 × 13 inches (144.8 × 132.1 × 33 cm), edition of 6
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. Photo: Rob McKeever

Roy Lichtenstein, Times Square Mural, 1990 (fabricated 1994, installed 2002) Porcelain enamel on steel, in 16 parts, overall: 73 inches × 53 feet (185.4 cm × 16.2 m), NYCT Times Square–42nd Street Station, commissioned by Metropolitan Transportation Authority Arts & Design© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Times Square Mural, 1990 (fabricated 1994, installed 2002)

Porcelain enamel on steel, in 16 parts, overall: 73 inches × 53 feet (185.4 cm × 16.2 m), NYCT Times Square–42nd Street Station, commissioned by Metropolitan Transportation Authority Arts & Design
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Nude with Bust (Study), 1995 Tape, marker, and painted and printed paper on board, 53 ⅞ × 44 ⅞ inches (136.8 × 114 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Nude with Bust (Study), 1995

Tape, marker, and painted and printed paper on board, 53 ⅞ × 44 ⅞ inches (136.8 × 114 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Endless Drip, 1995 Painted and fabricated aluminum, 142 ¼ × 13 ½ × 4 ½ inches (361.3 × 34.3 × 11.4 cm), edition of 3© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Endless Drip, 1995

Painted and fabricated aluminum, 142 ¼ × 13 ½ × 4 ½ inches (361.3 × 34.3 × 11.4 cm), edition of 3
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Landscape with Scholar’s Rock, 1997 Oil and Magna on canvas, 79 × 156 inches (200.7 × 396.2 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Landscape with Scholar’s Rock, 1997

Oil and Magna on canvas, 79 × 156 inches (200.7 × 396.2 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

About

Pop Art looks out into the world. It doesn’t look like a painting of something, it looks like the thing itself.
—Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Fox Lichtenstein’s (1923–1997) high-impact, iconic paintings have become synonymous with Pop art—a movement he helped originate—and his merging of mechanical reproduction and hand drawing has become central to the critical understanding of the movement.

Born in New York, Lichtenstein developed an interest in drawing, science, and jazz music at a young age. He attended Ohio State University (1940–42), before being drafted into the Army (1943–45). Supported by the G.I. Bill following the war, Lichtenstein resumed his art studies at the School of Fine and Applied Arts at Ohio State and graduated with an MFA in 1949. He stayed in Ohio for the next eight years, working first as a teacher and later as an industrial draftsman and furniture designer, among other part-time roles. Lichtenstein then accepted an assistant professorship in industrial design at the State University of New York, Oswego, which led to a teaching position at Douglass College at Rutgers University, New Jersey.

In 1961 Lichtenstein painted one of his first Pop paintings, Look Mickey. This work, in its use of cartoon characters and deliberate imitation of the Ben-Day dot commercial printing process, marked a major turning point in his career. Lichtenstein had his first solo show with Leo Castelli in early 1962—which sold out before the opening—and another in 1963. After this commercial success with Castelli, he resigned from Rutgers in 1964 and moved to back New York to concentrate exclusively on his art. Into the next decade, he depicted stylized landscapes, consumer-product packaging, adaptations of paintings by famous artists, geometric elements from Art Deco design, parodies of Abstract Expressionism, and war scenes and explosions. Despite their immense variation in subject matter, all of these works underlined the contradictions of representing three dimensions on a flat surface.

The late 1960s saw Lichtenstein’s first museum surveys: in 1967 the Pasadena Art Museum initiated a traveling retrospective, in 1968 the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, presented his first European retrospective, and in 1969 he had his first New York retrospective, at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. He began living in Southampton, New York, in 1968, and in 1984 he acquired a studio loft in Manhattan; thereafter he would split his time between Southampton and Manhattan.

In the early 1970s Lichtenstein explored formal questions further with his abstract Mirrors (1969–79) and Entablatures (1970–76) series. From 1974 into the 1980s he probed another long-standing interest: the concept of artistic style. He produced paintings that reinterpreted the forms and techniques of classical architecture, Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism, and more. Lichtenstein continued to question the role of style, this time in consumer culture, in his 1990s series Interiors (1990–97), which included images of his own works as decorative elements in domestic settings. In his attempt to fully grasp and expose how the forms, materials, and methods of production had shaped the images of Western visual culture, Lichtenstein also explored other mediums such as polychromatic ceramic, aluminum, brass, and serigraphy. He experimented with printmaking as early as the late 1940s and completed several large-scale public sculptures, as well as a number of major murals.

Lichtenstein continued to refine his technique and expand his subject matter in his later work, turning to such unexpected themes as the painterly gesture, the female nude, and Chinese landscape painting. In 1995 he was awarded the National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contributions to American art.

Roy Lichtenstein

Photo: Bill Ray

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Roy Lichtenstein: The Impossible Collection (New York: Assouline, 2019)

Talk and Book Signing

Avis Berman
Dorothy Lichtenstein

Monday, May 20, 2019, 6–7:30pm
Gagosian Shop, New York

Avis Berman, author of Roy Lichtenstein: The Impossible Collection, will be in conversation with Dorothy Lichtenstein to celebrate the release of the book. In this new Assouline Ultimate Collection volume, one hundred of Roy Lichtenstein’s most memorable works are lavishly reproduced, from the iconic Whaam! (1963) and Drowning Girl (1963) to later reinterpretations of paintings by Picasso, Matisse, and van Gogh and public commissions such as his 1994 mural for the Times Square – 42nd Street New York City subway station. Berman will sign copies of the book after the talk. To attend the free event, RSVP to lichtensteinrsvp@gagosian.com.

Download the full press release (PDF)

Roy Lichtenstein: The Impossible Collection (New York: Assouline, 2019)

Roy Lichtenstein, Modern Painting with Ionic Column, 1967 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Art Fair

TEFAF New York Spring 2019

May 3–7, 2019, booth 350
Park Avenue Armory, New York
www.tefaf.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in TEFAF New York Spring with a special presentation of works by Roy Lichtenstein. On view are paintings, sculptures, and works on paper from 1962 to 1980 that borrow from mass media and later reinterpret art historical movements such as Impressionism, Futurism, and Abstract Expressionism, epitomizing Lichtenstein’s ability to combine the illusionistic techniques of painting, sculpture, and design. 

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at tefaf.com.

Download the full press release (PDF)

Roy Lichtenstein, Modern Painting with Ionic Column, 1967 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Jeff Koons, Ode to Love, 2010–17 © Jeff Koons

Art Fair

Art Basel Miami Beach 2018

December 6–9, 2018, booth D7
Miami Beach Convention Center
www.artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in Art Basel Miami Beach 2018 with modern and contemporary artworks by Georg Baselitz, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Joe Bradley, Glenn Brown, John Chamberlain, Dan Colen, John Currin, Urs Fischer, Katharina Grosse, Mark Grotjahn, Andreas Gursky, Keith Haring, Damien Hirst, Howard Hodgkin, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Vera Lutter, Man Ray, Peter Marino, Takashi Murakami, Pablo Picasso, Richard Prince, Sterling Ruby, Ed Ruscha, Jenny Saville, Rudolf Stingel, Tatiana Trouvé, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, and Jonas Wood, among others.

To receive a PDF with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artbasel.com.

Jeff Koons, Ode to Love, 2010–17 © Jeff Koons

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Museum Exhibitions

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (da Vinci Mona Lisa), 2016, Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation © Jeff Koons

Opening this Week

POP Power from Warhol to Koons
Masterworks from the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation

September 28, 2019–March 8, 2020
Taubman Museum of Art, Roanoke, Virginia
www.taubmanmuseum.org

POP Power celebrates a perennial movement that revels in the new and the now, the celebrity and the commodity, and art made accessible for the masses. Work by Damien Hirst, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, and Andy Warhol is included.

Jeff Koons, Gazing Ball (da Vinci Mona Lisa), 2016, Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation © Jeff Koons

Theaster Gates, Gold Landscape in Three Strokes, 2017 © Theaster Gates

On View

La source

Through November 3, 2019
Fondation Carmignac, Porquerolles, France
www.fondationcarmignac.com

Visitors are invited to take off their shoes before descending beneath the surface of the Provençal farmhouse where the exhibition is staged to discover more than sixty artworks from the collection, as well as important loans and new productions. Work by Theaster Gates and Roy Lichtenstein is included.

Theaster Gates, Gold Landscape in Three Strokes2017 © Theaster Gates

Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature VIII, 1976, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Opening Soon

Order and Ornament
Roy Lichtenstein’s Entablatures

September 27, 2019–2020
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
whitney.org

This exhibition presents a diverse array of works on paper by Roy Lichtenstein related to his Entablatures series from the 1970s. Inspired by the architectural facades and ornamental motifs he encountered around Wall Street and elsewhere in Lower Manhattan, the series addresses many of Lichtenstein’s central artistic themes while demonstrating a unique emphasis on texture, surface, relief, and reflectivity.

Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature VIII, 1976, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Katharina Grosse, Untitled, 2011 © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst Bonn, 2019

Closed

Frozen Gesture
Gesten in der Malerei

May 18–August 18, 2019
Kunst Museum Winterthur, Switzerland
www.kmw.ch

In 1965 Roy Lichtenstein created his famous Brushstrokes and in doing so highlighted the fundamental elements of the image, such as the appearance of the colors and the pigment, the color fields and their limits, and not least the application of paint in the form of a gesture. This exhibition aims to explore the sheer range of gestures in contemporary painting. Work by Katharina Grosse, Roy Lichtenstein, and David Reed is included.

Katharina Grosse, Untitled, 2011 © Katharina Grosse and VG Bild-Kunst Bonn, 2019

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Press

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