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Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Black Flowers, 1961 Oil on canvas, 70 × 48 inches (177.8 × 121.9 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Black Flowers, 1961

Oil on canvas, 70 × 48 inches (177.8 × 121.9 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Masterpiece, 1962 Oil on canvas, 54 × 54 inches (137 × 137 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Masterpiece, 1962

Oil on canvas, 54 × 54 inches (137 × 137 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Happy Tears, 1964 Oil and Magna on canvas, 38 × 38 inches (97 × 97 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Happy Tears, 1964

Oil and Magna on canvas, 38 × 38 inches (97 × 97 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Compositions III, 1965 Magna on canvas, 56 × 48 inches (142.2 × 121.9 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Compositions III, 1965

Magna on canvas, 56 × 48 inches (142.2 × 121.9 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Peace through Chemistry, 1970 Oil and Magna on canvas, 100 × 180 inches (254 × 457.2 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Peace through Chemistry, 1970

Oil and Magna on canvas, 100 × 180 inches (254 × 457.2 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Cape Cod Still Life II, 1973 Oil and Magna on canvas, 60 × 74 inches (152.4 × 188 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Cape Cod Still Life II, 1973

Oil and Magna on canvas, 60 × 74 inches (152.4 × 188 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature, 1974 Magna, sand, Magna medium, and aluminum powder on canvas, 60 × 100 inches (152.4 × 254 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature, 1974

Magna, sand, Magna medium, and aluminum powder on canvas, 60 × 100 inches (152.4 × 254 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Mirror II (maquette), 1977 Painted wood, 59 ¾ × 30 × 12 inches (151.8 × 76.2 × 30.5 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Mirror II (maquette), 1977

Painted wood, 59 ¾ × 30 × 12 inches (151.8 × 76.2 × 30.5 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Expressionist Head, 1980 Painted and patinated bronze with painted wooden base, 55 × 41 × 18 inches (139.7 × 104.1 × 45.7 cm), edition of 6© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Expressionist Head, 1980

Painted and patinated bronze with painted wooden base, 55 × 41 × 18 inches (139.7 × 104.1 × 45.7 cm), edition of 6
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, The White Tree, 1980 Oil and Magna on canvas, 105 × 210 inches (266.7 × 533.4 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, The White Tree, 1980

Oil and Magna on canvas, 105 × 210 inches (266.7 × 533.4 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Sunrise Over Water, 1982 Oil and Magna on canvas, 66 × 112 inches (167.6 × 284.5 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Sunrise Over Water, 1982

Oil and Magna on canvas, 66 × 112 inches (167.6 × 284.5 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Abstract Painting, 1983 Oil and Magna on canvas, 70 × 54 inches (177.8 × 137.2 cm)© Roy Lichtenstein Foundation

Roy Lichtenstein, Abstract Painting, 1983

Oil and Magna on canvas, 70 × 54 inches (177.8 × 137.2 cm)
© Roy Lichtenstein Foundation

Roy Lichtenstein, replica of Greene Street Mural, 1983 (destroyed) Magna, printed paper, and tape on wall, 18 feet × 95 feet 8 inches (5.5 × 29.2 m), installed at Gagosian, West 24th Street, New York, September 10–October 17, 2015© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, replica of Greene Street Mural, 1983 (destroyed)

Magna, printed paper, and tape on wall, 18 feet × 95 feet 8 inches (5.5 × 29.2 m), installed at Gagosian, West 24th Street, New York, September 10–October 17, 2015
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Profile Head, 1988 Painted and patinated bronze, 36 ⅝ × 22 ½ × 9 ½ inches (93 × 57.2 × 24.1 cm), edition of 6© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Profile Head, 1988

Painted and patinated bronze, 36 ⅝ × 22 ½ × 9 ½ inches (93 × 57.2 × 24.1 cm), edition of 6
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Mobile III, 1990 Painted and patinated bronze, 57 × 52 × 13 inches (144.8 × 132.1 × 33 cm), edition of 6© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. Photo: Rob McKeever

Roy Lichtenstein, Mobile III, 1990

Painted and patinated bronze, 57 × 52 × 13 inches (144.8 × 132.1 × 33 cm), edition of 6
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein. Photo: Rob McKeever

Roy Lichtenstein, Times Square Mural, 1990 (fabricated 1994, installed 2002) Porcelain enamel on steel, in 16 parts, overall: 73 inches × 53 feet (185.4 cm × 16.2 m), NYCT Times Square–42nd Street Station, commissioned by Metropolitan Transportation Authority Arts & Design© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Times Square Mural, 1990 (fabricated 1994, installed 2002)

Porcelain enamel on steel, in 16 parts, overall: 73 inches × 53 feet (185.4 cm × 16.2 m), NYCT Times Square–42nd Street Station, commissioned by Metropolitan Transportation Authority Arts & Design
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Nude with Bust (Study), 1995 Tape, marker, and painted and printed paper on board, 53 ⅞ × 44 ⅞ inches (136.8 × 114 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Nude with Bust (Study), 1995

Tape, marker, and painted and printed paper on board, 53 ⅞ × 44 ⅞ inches (136.8 × 114 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Endless Drip, 1995 Painted and fabricated aluminum, 142 ¼ × 13 ½ × 4 ½ inches (361.3 × 34.3 × 11.4 cm), edition of 3© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Endless Drip, 1995

Painted and fabricated aluminum, 142 ¼ × 13 ½ × 4 ½ inches (361.3 × 34.3 × 11.4 cm), edition of 3
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Landscape with Scholar’s Rock, 1997 Oil and Magna on canvas, 79 × 156 inches (200.7 × 396.2 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Landscape with Scholar’s Rock, 1997

Oil and Magna on canvas, 79 × 156 inches (200.7 × 396.2 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

About

Pop Art looks out into the world. It doesn’t look like a painting of something, it looks like the thing itself.
—Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Fox Lichtenstein’s (1923–1997) high-impact, iconic paintings have become synonymous with Pop art—a movement he helped originate—and his merging of mechanical reproduction and hand drawing has become central to the critical understanding of the movement.

Born in New York, Lichtenstein developed an interest in drawing, science, and jazz music at a young age. He attended Ohio State University (1940–42), before being drafted into the Army (1943–45). Supported by the G.I. Bill following the war, Lichtenstein resumed his art studies at the School of Fine and Applied Arts at Ohio State and graduated with an MFA in 1949. He stayed in Ohio for the next eight years, working first as a teacher and later as an industrial draftsman and furniture designer, among other part-time roles. Lichtenstein then accepted an assistant professorship in industrial design at the State University of New York, Oswego, which led to a teaching position at Douglass College at Rutgers University, New Jersey.

In 1961 Lichtenstein painted one of his first Pop paintings, Look Mickey. This work, in its use of cartoon characters and deliberate imitation of the Ben-Day dot commercial printing process, marked a major turning point in his career. Lichtenstein had his first solo show with Leo Castelli in early 1962—which sold out before the opening—and another in 1963. After this commercial success with Castelli, he resigned from Rutgers in 1964 and moved to back New York to concentrate exclusively on his art. Into the next decade, he depicted stylized landscapes, consumer-product packaging, adaptations of paintings by famous artists, geometric elements from Art Deco design, parodies of Abstract Expressionism, and war scenes and explosions. Despite their immense variation in subject matter, all of these works underlined the contradictions of representing three dimensions on a flat surface.

The late 1960s saw Lichtenstein’s first museum surveys: in 1967 the Pasadena Art Museum initiated a traveling retrospective, in 1968 the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, presented his first European retrospective, and in 1969 he had his first New York retrospective, at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. He began living in Southampton, New York, in 1968, and in 1984 he acquired a studio loft in Manhattan; thereafter he would split his time between Southampton and Manhattan.

In the early 1970s Lichtenstein explored formal questions further with his abstract Mirrors (1969–79) and Entablatures (1970–76) series. From 1974 into the 1980s he probed another long-standing interest: the concept of artistic style. He produced paintings that reinterpreted the forms and techniques of classical architecture, Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism, and more. Lichtenstein continued to question the role of style, this time in consumer culture, in his 1990s series Interiors (1990–97), which included images of his own works as decorative elements in domestic settings. In his attempt to fully grasp and expose how the forms, materials, and methods of production had shaped the images of Western visual culture, Lichtenstein also explored other mediums such as polychromatic ceramic, aluminum, brass, and serigraphy. He experimented with printmaking as early as the late 1940s and completed several large-scale public sculptures, as well as a number of major murals.

Lichtenstein continued to refine his technique and expand his subject matter in his later work, turning to such unexpected themes as the painterly gesture, the female nude, and Chinese landscape painting. In 1995 he was awarded the National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contributions to American art.

Roy Lichtenstein

Photo: Bill Ray

Black-and-white photograph: Donald Marron, c. 1984.

Donald Marron

Jacoba Urist profiles the legendary collector.

Alexander Calder poster for McGovern, 1972, lithograph

The Art History of Presidential Campaign Posters

Against the backdrop of the 2020 US presidential election, historian Hal Wert takes us through the artistic and political evolution of American campaign posters, from their origin in 1844 to the present. In an interview with Quarterly editor Gillian Jakab, Wert highlights an array of landmark posters and the artists who made them.

Dorothy Lichtenstein in Roy Lichtenstein’s Southampton studio. Photo by Kasia Wandycz/Paris Match via Getty Images

In Conversation
Dorothy Lichtenstein

Dorothy Lichtenstein sits down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the changes underway at the Lichtenstein Foundation, life in the 1960s, and what brought her to—and kept her in—the Hamptons.

The cover of the Fall 2019 Gagosian Quarterly magazine. Artwork by Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2019

The Fall 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Sinking (2019) by Nathaniel Mary Quinn on its cover.

Still from video Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Jenny Saville reveals the process behind her new self-portrait, painted in response to Rembrandt’s masterpiece Self-Portrait with Two Circles.

Roy Lichtenstein: 1961 to 1965

Roy Lichtenstein: 1961 to 1965

Gillian Pistell examines Roy Lichtenstein’s aesthetic developments in the years 1961 to 1965.

Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2018

Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2018

The Winter 2018 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available. Our cover this issue comes from High Times, a new body of work by Richard Prince.

One-Cent Life

Book Corner
One-Cent Life

A 1964 publication by the Chinese-American artist and poet Walasse Ting and Abstract Expressionist painter Sam Francis.

Desire

Desire

Diana Widmaier Picasso, curator of the exhibition Desire, reflects on the history of eroticism in art.

Greene Street Mural

Greene Street Mural

Jack Cowart, Executive Director of the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation, and Rob McKeever, a former assistant to Lichtenstein, recall the making of the original Greene Street Mural.

Time-lapse: Greene Street Mural

Behind the Art
Time-lapse: Greene Street Mural

More than thirty years after its creation, Gagosian presents a full-scale painted replica of the original Greene Street Mural by Roy Lichtenstein, based on documentation from the artist’s studio and produced by sign painters under the supervision of his former studio assistant.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Sarah Sze, Afterimage, Silver, 2018 © Sarah Sze

Support

Artists for Biden

October 2–8, 2020

Artists for Biden is an online-only sale of works by leading contemporary artists to support the Biden Victory Fund—a joint fundraising committee authorized by Biden for President, the Democratic National Committee, and forty-seven state Democratic parties. All proceeds from the sale will provide resources needed to elect Joe Biden and Kamala Harris and support other Democratic candidates across the country in the lead up to Election Day. Work by Cecily Brown, Michael Heizer, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Brice Marden, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Sarah Sze, Stanley Whitney, and Christopher Wool will be available. To register for early access on October 1, visit secure.joebiden.com.

Sarah Sze, Afterimage, Silver, 2018 © Sarah Sze

Helen Frankenthaler, Orange Underline, 1963 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Art Fair

Basel Online 2020

In our most significant online sales presentation to date, Gagosian unveils important works by modern and contemporary masters through two separate online platforms—Gagosian Online and Art Basel Online. These individually curated selections offer collectors direct access to artworks of the highest caliber. To experience the presentation in its entirety, viewers will need to visit both gagosian.com and artbasel.com. The works on gagosian.com will rotate every forty-eight hours, for a total of five cycles.

Helen Frankenthaler, Orange Underline, 1963 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Installation view, American Pastoral, Gagosian, Britannia Street, London, January 23–March 14, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Adam McEwen, Thomas Moran, © Richard Prince, © Banks Violette, © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Tour

American Pastoral

Thursday, March 5, 2020, 6:30pm
Gagosian, Britannia Street, London

Join Gagosian for a tour of the group exhibition American Pastoral. The show juxtaposes modern and contemporary works with historical American landscapes ranging from Albert Bierstadt’s depiction of the sublime in Sunset over the River (1877) to Edward Hopper’s tranquil seaside scene, Gloucester Harbor (1926). Gagosian’s Alice Godwin will focus on a select grouping of exhibited works that seek to challenge the idealized vision of the American Dream that has long been a rich topic of inquiry for artists in the United States. To attend the free event, RSVP to londontours@gagosian.com. Space is limited.

Installation view, American Pastoral, Gagosian, Britannia Street, London, January 23–March 14, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Adam McEwen, Thomas Moran, © Richard Prince, © Banks Violette, © Ed Ruscha. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

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Museum Exhibitions

Roy Lichtenstein, Variations No. 7, 1959, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Opening this Week

Roy Lichtenstein
History in the Making, 1948–1960

August 1–October 24, 2021
Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York
parrishart.org

This exhibition investigates the early work of Roy Lichtenstein, providing an illuminating prologue to the artist’s well-known comics-inspired imagery. History in the Making tells the largely overlooked story of Lichtenstein’s early career, when formal experimentation and a keen eye for irony irrevocably defined his art. Bringing together works from museum and private collections across the United States, the exhibition presents approximately eighty paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints, many never before seen by the public.

Roy Lichtenstein, Variations No. 7, 1959, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002 © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Just Opened

Hey! Did you know that art does not exist

Through January 7, 2022
Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Israel
www.tamuseum.org.il

This exhibition presents more than one hundred works from Sylvio Perlstein’s intensely personal collection, which traces artists and trends that have defined the avant-garde, complex, and experimental nature of twentieth-century art. Work by Jean-Michel BasquiatDuane HansonRoy LichtensteinMan RayBrice Marden, Ed RuschaRudolf Stingel, Cy Twombly, and Andy Warhol is included.

Rudolf Stingel, Untitled, 2002 © Rudolf Stingel. Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

Theaster Gates, Monument in Waiting, 2020, installation view, Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York © Theaster Gates. Photo: courtesy GRAY, Chicago/New York

On View

Field of Dreams

Through August 31, 2021
Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York
parrishart.org

Field of Dreams activates the Parrish Art Museum’s expansive meadows with sculpture by ten international, multigenerational artists that engages and responds to the museum’s architecture and landscape. Created to extend the galleries outdoors, the exhibition series is part of the Parrish’s new Art in the Meadow initiative that enlivens its 14-acre grounds with artworks, performances, and projections. Work by Theaster Gates, Roy Lichtenstein, and Giuseppe Penone is included.

Theaster Gates, Monument in Waiting, 2020, installation view, Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York © Theaster Gates. Photo: courtesy GRAY, Chicago/New York

Georg Baselitz, B. für Larry (Remix), 2006 © Georg Baselitz

On View

Wonderland

Through September 19, 2021
Albertina Modern, Vienna
www.albertina.at

Inspired by Lewis Carroll’s 1865 novel Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, this exhibition features more than a hundred contemporary artworks from the Albertina’s collection organized into seven different “chapters” conceived as independent yet loosely connected “worlds.”  Work by Georg Baselitz, Katharina Grosse, Anselm Kiefer, Roy Lichtenstein, Albert Oehlen, Andy Warhol, and Franz West is included.

Georg Baselitz, B. für Larry (Remix), 2006 © Georg Baselitz

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Press

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