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Sculpture

July 20–August 30, 2006
Beverly Hills

SCULPTURE Installation view

SCULPTURE

Installation view

Works Exhibited

Jeff Koons, Elephant, 2006 Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 150 × 120 × 7 ¼ inches (381 × 304.8 × 18.4 cm), 1 of 5 unique versions© Jeff Koons

Jeff Koons, Elephant, 2006

Mirror-polished stainless steel with transparent color coating, 150 × 120 × 7 ¼ inches (381 × 304.8 × 18.4 cm), 1 of 5 unique versions
© Jeff Koons

Richard Artschwager, Splatter Table, 2005 Formica and acrylic on wood, 45 × 42 × 1 inches (114.3 × 106.7 × 2.5 cm)

Richard Artschwager, Splatter Table, 2005

Formica and acrylic on wood, 45 × 42 × 1 inches (114.3 × 106.7 × 2.5 cm)

Robert Therrien, No title, 2004 Stainless steel, 97 × 21 × 21 inches (246.4 × 53.3 × 53.3 cm), edition of 5

Robert Therrien, No title, 2004

Stainless steel, 97 × 21 × 21 inches (246.4 × 53.3 × 53.3 cm), edition of 5

Maya Lin, Rock Field/36, 2006 36 Blown glass rocks, Dimensions variable

Maya Lin, Rock Field/36, 2006

36 Blown glass rocks, Dimensions variable

Damien Hirst, Adam and Eve, Blue for Adam and Pink for Eve, 1997 Glass, steel, formaldehyde solution, cow and bull's heads; Household gloss paint on canvas, 2 vitrines: 18 × 36 × 18 inches each (45.7 × 91.4 × 45.7 cm); 2 canvases: 15 × 23 inches each (38.1 × 58.4 cm)

Damien Hirst, Adam and Eve, Blue for Adam and Pink for Eve, 1997

Glass, steel, formaldehyde solution, cow and bull's heads; Household gloss paint on canvas, 2 vitrines: 18 × 36 × 18 inches each (45.7 × 91.4 × 45.7 cm); 2 canvases: 15 × 23 inches each (38.1 × 58.4 cm)

Tom Friedman, Untitled, 1997 Colored Styrofoam pellets, Dimensions variable

Tom Friedman, Untitled, 1997

Colored Styrofoam pellets, Dimensions variable

In the Studio: Damien Hirst’s Veil Paintings

In the Studio: Damien Hirst’s Veil Paintings

Damien Hirst speaks about his Veil paintings with Gagosian’s Alison McDonald. “I wanted to make paintings that were a celebration,” he says, “and that revealed something and obscured something at the same time.” 

Damien Hirst, Happiness, 1993–94, oil on canvas, 24 × 17 ⅞ inches.

Damien Hirst: Visual Candy

James Fox considers the origins of Damien Hirst’s Visual Candy paintings on the occasion of a recent exhibition of these early works in Hong Kong.

Damien Hirst, Fruit Salad, 2016, household gloss on canvas, 16 × 24 inches.

Damien Hirst: Colour Space Paintings

Blake Gopnik examines the artist’s “dot” paintings in relation to the history of representation in Western art, in which dabs of paint have served as fundamental units of depiction and markers of objective truth.

Josh Kline, Skittles, 2014, commercial fridge, light box, and blended liquids in bottles, 86 ½ × 127 ½ × 41 inches (219.7 × 323.9 × 104.1 cm) © Josh Kline. Photo:  © Timothy Schenck

Laws of Motion

Catalyzed by Laws of Motion—a group exhibition, curated by Sam Orlofsky, pairing artworks from the 1980s on by Jeff Koons, Cady Noland, Rosemarie Trockel, and Jeff Wall with contemporary sculptures by Josh Kline and Anicka Yi—Wyatt Allgeier discusses the convergences and divergences in these artists’ practices with an eye to the economic worlds from which they spring.

Robert Therrien: The Causal Link to the (Un)Real

Robert Therrien: The Causal Link to the (Un)Real

In honor of the extraordinary life of Robert Therrien (1947–2019), Aimee Gabbard writes about her time with the artist and explores his lifelong interest in photography.

River Café menu with illustration by Ed Ruscha.

The River Café Cookbook

London’s River Café, a culinary mecca perched on a bend in the River Thames, celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in 2018. To celebrate this milestone and the publication of her cookbook River Café London, cofounder Ruth Rogers sat down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the famed restaurant’s allure.