Menu

Urs Fischer

Sōtatsu

May 3–June 23, 2018
980 Madison Avenue, New York

Installation video Play Button

Installation video

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Urs Fischer, Sōtatsu, 2018 (detail) Aluminum, epoxy resin, double-sided tape, and screen printing ink, in 9 parts, each: 94 ½ × 71 inches (240 × 180.3 cm)© Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer, Sōtatsu, 2018 (detail)

Aluminum, epoxy resin, double-sided tape, and screen printing ink, in 9 parts, each: 94 ½ × 71 inches (240 × 180.3 cm)
© Urs Fischer

About

Art is open—it can go on endlessly.
—Urs Fischer

Gagosian is pleased to present Sōtatsu, a new painting in nine parts by Urs Fischer.

In this work, which is installed in successive panels along the walls of a single room, Fischer explores the ways that space can be divided, stretched, opened, and closed—creating a panorama that is as continuous as it is fragmented. Inspired by the hand scrolls and painted screens of early seventeenth-century Japanese artist Tawaraya Sōtatsu, Fischer’s interior landscape uses negative space, light, and repetition to evoke time and movement. Sōtatsu, whose work Fischer has long admired, was a cofounder of the Rinpa school, which favored traditional Japanese subjects, such as gardens, cranes, the four seasons, and references to Heian-period poetry, while incorporating shimmering metallic backgrounds, bold colors, and images intersecting with calligraphic text.

In a twenty-first-century echo of Sōtatsu’s aesthetic innovations, Fischer merges traditional art historical themes with new technologies. The painting is handmade on a digital substrate, then silkscreened onto aluminum panels. Instead of a direct translation from tablet screen to paper surface, Fischer’s process imbues the digital image with an analog tactility; in some places, his painterly gestures loosen, revealing patches of the shiny aluminum beneath. The image unfolds in succession, starting with a view of a room in Fischer’s home. Furniture, books, and artwork are illuminated by both natural and artificial light, and as the room continues to disintegrate, objects appear and dissolve across the nine large panels, concluding with an exterior view: two birds flying in a sky that is at once stormy and clear.

Read more

Urs Fischer: Sotatsu

Urs Fischer: Sotatsu

Urs Fischer and Francesco Bonami sat down with the Gagosian Quarterly to discuss Sōtatsu, a new painting in nine parts.

Installation view of Urs Fischer’s Untitled (2011) in the exhibition Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, Paris, 2021. Artwork © Urs Fischer, courtesy Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich; Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, Agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Bourse de Commerce

William Middleton traces the development of the new institution, examining the collaboration between the collector François Pinault and the architect Tadao Ando in revitalizing the historic space. Middleton also speaks with artists Tatiana Trouvé and Albert Oehlen about Pinault’s passion as a collector, and with the Bouroullec brothers, who created design features for the interiors and exteriors of the museum.

Augurs of Spring

Augurs of Spring

As spring approaches in the Northern Hemisphere, Sydney Stutterheim reflects on the iconography and symbolism of the season in art both past and present.

Installation view, Crushed, Cast, Constructed: Sculpture by John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, and Charles Ray, Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London, June 15–July 31, 2020

Uncanny Delights: Sculpture by John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, and Charles Ray

Catalyzed by the exhibition Crushed, Cast, Constructed: Sculpture by John Chamberlain, Urs Fischer, and Charles Ray, Alice Godwin examines the legacy and development of a Surrealist ethos in selected works from three contemporary sculptors.

Installation view, Urs Fischer: The Lyrical and the Prosaic, Aïshti Foundation, Beirut, October 20, 2019–October 31, 2020.

Urs Fischer: Lives of Forms

In his introduction to the catalogue for Urs Fischer’s exhibition The Lyrical and the Prosaic, at the Aïshti Foundation in Beirut, curator Massimiliano Gioni traces the material and conceptual tensions that reverberate throughout the artist’s paintings, sculptures, installations, and interventions.

Urs Fischer, A–Z, 2019, a sculpture of a pear and an apple.

Fruit and Vegetables: Francesco Bonami on Urs Fischer

Fruit and vegetables are a recurring motif in Urs Fischer’s visual vocabulary, introducing the dimension of time while elaborating on the art historical tradition of the vanitas. Here, curator Francesco Bonami traces this thread through the artist’s sculptures and paintings of the past two decades.

News

Photo: Chad Moore

Artist Spotlight

Urs Fischer

June 24–30, 2020

Urs Fischer mines the potential of materials—from clay, steel, and paint to bread, dirt, and produce—to create works that disorient and bewilder. Through scale distortions, illusion, and the juxtaposition of common objects, his paintings, sculptures, photographs, and large-scale installations explore themes of perception and representation while maintaining a witty irreverence and mordant humor.

Photo: Chad Moore