Menu

Artist Spotlight

Sally Mann

November 17–23, 2021

Sally Mann is known for her photographs of intimate and familiar subjects rendered both sublime and disquieting. Her projects explore the complexities of familial relationships, social realities, and the passage of time, capturing tensions between nature, history, and memory. Central to Mann’s investigation are the landscapes that she has photographed both near her home in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley and across the South for over three decades. Often using a view camera, Mann draws on the history of both her medium and the Southern landscape to produce photographs that are expressive and elegiac.

Launched in 2020, Artist Spotlight is presented once a month as a regular part of the gallery’s programming. Each Artist Spotlight highlights a work by an individual artist—made available exclusively online for forty-eight hours—together with new editorial features and selected archival content.

Artist Spotlight: Sally Mann features a new photograph by the artist, from a never-before-seen series, Vinculum. For more information, please contact the gallery at collecting@gagosian.com.

Photo: © Annie Leibovitz

Photo: © Annie Leibovitz

Related News

Sally Mann, Ponder Heart, 2009 © Sally Mann

Award

Sally Mann
OPUS Award

Sally Mann is the 2021 recipient of the annual OPUS Award. Presented by the Ogden Museum of Southern Art in New Orleans, the award is bestowed to individuals who have made and continue to make significant contributions to the vibrant and complex fabric of American Southern art. Mann, who was born in Lexington, Virginia, began her photographic practice in the 1960s and has remained connected to her Southern roots, documenting the people and places of the region in various critically acclaimed bodies of work. The award will be presented in January 2022, at the museum’s annual “O What a Night” gala.

Sally Mann, Ponder Heart, 2009 © Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Emmett, Jessie, and Virginia, 1989 © Sally Mann

Honor

Sally Mann
International Photography Hall of Fame

Sally Mann has been inducted into the International Photography Hall of Fame, which recognizes those who have advanced the field of photography. Throughout her career, Mann has investigated the visual and metaphorical potential of employing nineteenth-century technologies. She has long used an 8 × 10 bellows camera and has explored platinum, bromoil, and wet-plate collodion processes to make prints that capture the complexities of familial relationships, social realities, and the passage of time. The induction ceremony took place on October 29, 2021, in St. Louis and online.

Sally Mann, Emmett, Jessie, and Virginia, 1989 © Sally Mann

Still from “Sally Mann: Abide with Me”

Video

Sally Mann
Abide with Me

In the early 2000s, Sally Mann continued to reflect on how slavery and segregation had left their mark on the landscape of Virginia and, in turn, shaped her own childhood. “Abide with Me,” a video produced by the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts, and featured in the exhibition Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings, explores these entwined histories.

Still from “Sally Mann: Abide with Me”

See all News for Sally Mann

Museum Exhibitions

Sally Mann, Georgia, Untitled (Beaver Log), 1996 © Sally Mann

On View

Sally Mann in
Picturing the South: 25 Years

Through February 6, 2022
High Museum of Art, Atlanta
high.org

In 1996, the High Museum of Art began commissioning photographers from around the world to engage with and explore the rich social and geographic landscape of the American South for its Picturing the South initiative. Organized on the occasion of the project’s twenty-fifth anniversary, this exhibition brings together all of the commissions for the first time. Taken as a whole, the photographs amount to a complex and layered archive of the region that addresses broad themes, including racial justice, the legacy of slavery, the social implications of the evolving landscape, and the distinct and diverse character of the region’s people. Work by Sally Mann is included.

Sally Mann, Georgia, Untitled (Beaver Log), 1996 © Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Emmett Till River Bank), 1998 © Sally Mann

On View

New Symphony of Time

Opened September 7, 2019
Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson
www.msmuseumart.org

New Symphony of Time expands the boundaries of Mississippi’s identity, casting light on a shared past to help reflect an expansive, more inclusive future. The exhibition aims to explore personal and collective memory, history and the connection to place, and the roles artists play in pursuit of civil rights and racial equity through ancestry. Themes include migration, movement, and home; shared humanity; environment; and liberty. Work by Titus Kaphar and Sally Mann is included.

Sally Mann, Deep South, Untitled (Emmett Till River Bank), 1998 © Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Georgia, Untitled (Allee), 1996 © Sally Mann

Closed

Sally Mann in
American Landscapes

September 9–November 19, 2021
David C. Driskell Center for the Study of Visual Arts and Culture of African Americans and the African Diaspora, University of Maryland, College Park
driskellcenter.umd.edu

American Landscapes presents a comprehensive narrative of the contribution of African American artists to the field of landscape art and the canon of American art. It is the first major exhibition in the Driskell Center’s physical space since the passing of Professor David C. Driskell in April 2020. The featured works date from circa 1850 to 2020 with over half selected from the Driskell Center collection. Additionally, thirty landscape works by Driskell, known for his love and depiction of pine trees, gardens, and landscapes, will be exhibited. Work by Sally Mann is included.

Sally Mann, Georgia, Untitled (Allee), 1996 © Sally Mann

Sally Mann, Holding Virginia, 1989 © Sally Mann

Closed

Sally Mann in
Wilde Kindheit

May 12–September 5, 2021
Lentos Kunstmuseum, Linz, Austria
www.lentos.at

This exhibition, whose title translates to Real Wild Child, presents works by 170 international artists from 1900 to the present day. Strong on critical acumen, empathy, irony, and humor, the artists document children’s happiness as well as their frustrations. Work by Sally Mann is included.

Sally Mann, Holding Virginia, 1989 © Sally Mann

See all Museum Exhibitions for Sally Mann