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Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler, Painted on 21st Street, 1950 Oil, sand, plaster of Paris, and coffee grounds on sized, primed canvas, 69 ⅛ × 97 inches (175.6 × 246.4 cm), Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Painted on 21st Street, 1950

Oil, sand, plaster of Paris, and coffee grounds on sized, primed canvas, 69 ⅛ × 97 inches (175.6 × 246.4 cm), Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1951 Oil and enamel on sized, primed canvas, 56 ⅜ × 84 ½ inches (143.2 × 214.6 cm), Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1951

Oil and enamel on sized, primed canvas, 56 ⅜ × 84 ½ inches (143.2 × 214.6 cm), Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Mountains and Sea, 1952 Oil and charcoal on unsized, unprimed canvas, 86 ⅜ × 117 ¼ inches (219.4 × 297.8 cm), Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York, on extended loan to the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Mountains and Sea, 1952

Oil and charcoal on unsized, unprimed canvas, 86 ⅜ × 117 ¼ inches (219.4 × 297.8 cm), Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York, on extended loan to the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Open Wall, 1953 Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 53 ¾ × 131 inches (136.5 × 332.7 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Open Wall, 1953

Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 53 ¾ × 131 inches (136.5 × 332.7 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Trojan Gates, 1955 Oil and enamel on sized, primed canvas, 72 × 48 ⅞ inches (182.9 × 124.1 cm), Museum of Modern Art, New York© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Trojan Gates, 1955

Oil and enamel on sized, primed canvas, 72 × 48 ⅞ inches (182.9 × 124.1 cm), Museum of Modern Art, New York
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957 Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 70 × 54 ½ inches (177.8 × 138.4 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957

Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 70 × 54 ½ inches (177.8 × 138.4 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Madridscape, 1958 Charcoal, crayon, watercolor, and ink on paper, 25 ¼ × 34 ½ inches (64.1 × 87.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Madridscape, 1958

Charcoal, crayon, watercolor, and ink on paper, 25 ¼ × 34 ½ inches (64.1 × 87.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, First Creatures, 1959 Oil, enamel, charcoal, and pencil on sized, primed canvas, 64 ¾ × 111 inches (164.5 × 281.9 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, First Creatures, 1959

Oil, enamel, charcoal, and pencil on sized, primed canvas, 64 ¾ × 111 inches (164.5 × 281.9 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1959–60 Oil and charcoal on sized, primed linen, 89 ¾ × 69 ¾ inches (228 × 177.2 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1959–60

Oil and charcoal on sized, primed linen, 89 ¾ × 69 ¾ inches (228 × 177.2 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, May Scene, 1961 Oil on sized, primed linen, 35 ⅞ × 59 ⅞ inches (91.1 × 152.1 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, May Scene, 1961

Oil on sized, primed linen, 35 ⅞ × 59 ⅞ inches (91.1 × 152.1 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Celebration Bouquet, 1962 Oil on sized, primed linen, 13 ⅜ × 29 ⅜ inches (34 × 74.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Celebration Bouquet, 1962

Oil on sized, primed linen, 13 ⅜ × 29 ⅜ inches (34 × 74.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Cool Summer, 1962 Oil on canvas, 69 ¾ × 120 inches (177.2 × 304.8 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Cool Summer, 1962

Oil on canvas, 69 ¾ × 120 inches (177.2 × 304.8 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Milkwood Arcade, 1963 Acrylic on canvas, 86 ½ × 80 ¾ inches (219.7 × 205.1 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Milkwood Arcade, 1963

Acrylic on canvas, 86 ½ × 80 ¾ inches (219.7 × 205.1 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Provincetown Window, 1963–64 Acrylic on canvas, 82 ⅜ × 81 ⅞ inches (209.2 × 208 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Provincetown Window, 1963–64

Acrylic on canvas, 82 ⅜ × 81 ⅞ inches (209.2 × 208 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Square Field, 1966 Acrylic on canvas, 22 × 28 inches (55.9 × 71.1 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Tim Pyle

Helen Frankenthaler, Square Field, 1966

Acrylic on canvas, 22 × 28 inches (55.9 × 71.1 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Tim Pyle

Helen Frankenthaler, The Human Edge, 1967 Acrylic on canvas, 124 × 93 ¼ inches (315 × 236.9 cm), Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: courtesy Everson Museum of Art

Helen Frankenthaler, The Human Edge, 1967

Acrylic on canvas, 124 × 93 ¼ inches (315 × 236.9 cm), Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: courtesy Everson Museum of Art

Helen Frankenthaler, Sesame, 1970 Acrylic on canvas, 106 × 82 ½ inches (269.2 × 209.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Sesame, 1970

Acrylic on canvas, 106 × 82 ½ inches (269.2 × 209.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Nature Abhors a Vaccum, 1973 Acrylic on canvas, 103 ½ × 112 inches (262.9 × 284.5 cm), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Nature Abhors a Vaccum, 1973

Acrylic on canvas, 103 ½ × 112 inches (262.9 × 284.5 cm), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Savage Breeze, 1974 8-color woodcut from 8 woodblocks on handmade paper, 31 ½ × 27 inches (80 × 68.6 cm), Williams College Museum of Art, Massachusetts© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), West Islip, LI, New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Savage Breeze, 1974

8-color woodcut from 8 woodblocks on handmade paper, 31 ½ × 27 inches (80 × 68.6 cm), Williams College Museum of Art, Massachusetts
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), West Islip, LI, New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Rapunzel, 1974 Acrylic on canvas, 108 × 81 inches (274.3 × 205.7 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Rapunzel, 1974

Acrylic on canvas, 108 × 81 inches (274.3 × 205.7 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Sentry, 1976 Acrylic on canvas, 114 × 90 inches (289.6 × 228.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Sentry, 1976

Acrylic on canvas, 114 × 90 inches (289.6 × 228.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Mineral Kingdom, 1976 Acrylic on canvas, 69 × 108 ½ inches (175.3 × 275.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Mineral Kingdom, 1976

Acrylic on canvas, 69 × 108 ½ inches (175.3 × 275.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Grey Fireworks, 1982 Acrylic on canvas, 72 × 118 ½ inches (182.9 × 301 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Grey Fireworks, 1982

Acrylic on canvas, 72 × 118 ½ inches (182.9 × 301 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Covent Garden Study: Final Maquette for Set, Third Movement, Royal Ballet Number Three, 1984 Acrylic on canvas, 16 ⅛ × 28 ¾ inches (41 × 73 cm), Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Covent Garden Study: Final Maquette for Set, Third Movement, Royal Ballet Number Three, 1984

Acrylic on canvas, 16 ⅛ × 28 ¾ inches (41 × 73 cm), Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Columbine, 1985 Acrylic on canvas, 81 ¼ × 48 ¾ inches (206.4 × 123.8 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Columbine, 1985

Acrylic on canvas, 81 ¼ × 48 ¾ inches (206.4 × 123.8 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Syzygy, 1987 Acrylic on canvas, 88 ¼ × 59 ½ inches (224.2 × 151.1 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Syzygy, 1987

Acrylic on canvas, 88 ¼ × 59 ½ inches (224.2 × 151.1 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Gateway, 1982–88 (recto) Recto: lost-wax bronze casting with applied patinas and 28-color intaglio print with etching, relief, and aquatint, with borders hand stenciled on three sheets; verso: 3 sandblasted bronze panels hand painted by the artist with a mixture of chemicals, pigments, and dyes; 81 × 107 × 4 ½ inches (205.7 × 271.8 × 11.4 cm); edition 6/12; cast at Tallix Foundry, Beacon, New York, printed and published at Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, NY© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd. 1987

Helen Frankenthaler, Gateway, 1982–88 (recto)

Recto: lost-wax bronze casting with applied patinas and 28-color intaglio print with etching, relief, and aquatint, with borders hand stenciled on three sheets; verso: 3 sandblasted bronze panels hand painted by the artist with a mixture of chemicals, pigments, and dyes; 81 × 107 × 4 ½ inches (205.7 × 271.8 × 11.4 cm); edition 6/12; cast at Tallix Foundry, Beacon, New York, printed and published at Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, NY
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd. 1987

Helen Frankenthaler, Gateway, 1982–88 (verso) Recto: lost-wax bronze casting with applied patinas and 28-color intaglio print with etching, relief, and aquatint, with borders hand stenciled on three sheets; verso: 3 sandblasted bronze panels hand painted by the artist with a mixture of chemicals, pigments, and dyes; 81 × 107 × 4 ½ inches (205.7 × 271.8 × 11.4 cm); edition 6/12; cast at Tallix Foundry, Beacon, New York, printed and published at Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, NY© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd. 1987

Helen Frankenthaler, Gateway, 1982–88 (verso)

Recto: lost-wax bronze casting with applied patinas and 28-color intaglio print with etching, relief, and aquatint, with borders hand stenciled on three sheets; verso: 3 sandblasted bronze panels hand painted by the artist with a mixture of chemicals, pigments, and dyes; 81 × 107 × 4 ½ inches (205.7 × 271.8 × 11.4 cm); edition 6/12; cast at Tallix Foundry, Beacon, New York, printed and published at Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, NY
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd. 1987

Helen Frankenthaler, Flirt, 1995 Acrylic on paper, 60 ½ × 89 ½ inches (153.7 × 227.3 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Flirt, 1995

Acrylic on paper, 60 ½ × 89 ½ inches (153.7 × 227.3 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

About

A line, color, shapes, spaces, all do one thing for and within themselves, and yet do something else, in relation to everything that is going on within the four sides [of the canvas]. A line is a line, but [also] is a color. . . . It does this here, but that there. The canvas surface is flat and yet the space extends for miles. What a lie, what trickery—how beautiful is the very idea of painting.
—Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011), whose career spanned six decades, has long been recognized as one of the great American artists of the twentieth century. A member of the second generation of postwar American abstract painters, she is widely credited with playing a pivotal role in the transition from Abstract Expressionism to Color Field painting. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, she expanded the possibilities of abstraction, while at times referencing figuration and landscape in highly personal ways. She produced a body of work whose impact on contemporary art has been profound and continues to grow.

Frankenthaler was born on December 12, 1928, and raised in New York. She attended the Dalton School, where she received her earliest art instruction from Rufino Tamayo. In 1949 she graduated from Bennington College, Vermont, where she was a student of Paul Feeley, following which she studied briefly with Hans Hofmann.

Frankenthaler exhibited her work professionally for the first time in 1950, at the Kootz Gallery in New York, when Adolph Gottlieb selected her painting Beach (1950) for inclusion in Fifteen Unknowns: Selected by Artists of the Kootz Gallery. Her first solo exhibition was presented in 1951, at New York’s Tibor de Nagy Gallery, and that year she was also included in the landmark 9th St. Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture in New York.

In 1952 Frankenthaler created Mountains and Sea, her breakthrough soak-stain painting. She poured thinned paint directly onto raw, unprimed canvas laid on the studio floor, working from all sides to create floating fields of translucent color. Mountains and Sea was immediately influential for the artists who formed the Color Field school of painting, notable among them Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland.

As early as 1959 Frankenthaler began to be a regular presence in major international exhibitions. That year she won first prize at the Première Biennale de Paris, and in 1966 she represented the United States at the 33rd Biennale di Venezia, alongside Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, and Jules Olitski. She had her first museum retrospective in 1960, at New York’s Jewish Museum, and her second in 1969, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, followed by an international tour. Additional museum retrospectives have been held at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and touring venues (1985, works on paper); Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas, and touring venues, including Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989, paintings); National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, and touring venues (1993, prints); Naples Museum of Art, Florida, and touring venues, including Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut (2002, woodcuts); and Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Florida, and touring venue, Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh, Scotland (2003, works on paper).

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Helen Frankenthaler

Photo: Alexander Liberman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles

Augurs of Spring

Augurs of Spring

As spring approaches in the Northern Hemisphere, Sydney Stutterheim reflects on the iconography and symbolism of the season in art both past and present.

Helen Frankenthaler, Cool Summer, 1962, oil on canvas, 69 ¾ × 120 inches (177.2 × 304.8 cm), Collection Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

Building a Legacy
The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation on COVID-19 Relief Funding

The Quarterly’s Alison McDonald speaks with Clifford Ross, Frederick J. Iseman, and Dr. Lise Motherwell, members of the board of directors of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and Elizabeth Smith, executive director, about the foundation’s decision to establish a multiyear initiative dedicated to providing $5 million in covid-19 relief for artists and arts professionals.

A portrait of Betty Parsons surrounded by art.

Game Changer
Betty Parsons

Wyatt Allgeier pays homage to the renowned gallerist and artist Betty Parsons (1900–1982).

Helen Frankenthaler in her studio in Provincetown. Black and white image.

Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown

Lise Motherwell, a stepdaughter of Helen Frankenthaler and vice president of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and Elizabeth Smith, executive director of the Foundation, recently cocurated an exhibition of the artist’s work entitled Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown. Here they discuss the origin of the exhibition, the relationship between the artist’s work and her summers spent in Provincetown, and the presentations at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, in 2018, and the Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York, in 2019.

Helen Frankenthaler, Riverhead, 1963 (detail).

Frankenthaler

On the occasion of the exhibition Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992, at the Museo di Palazzo Grimani in Venice, Italy, art historians John Elderfield and Pepe Karmel discuss the concept of the panorama in relation to the artist’s work. Their conversation traces developments in Frankenthaler’s approach to composition, the boundaries and conventions of abstraction, and how, in many ways, her career continually challenged established theories of art history.

Helen Frankenthaler in gondola with various friends, Venice, June 1966

Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992

Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992 marks the first time that Frankenthaler’s paintings have been exhibited in Venice since her inclusion in the 1966 Biennale as part of the US Pavilion. This video, including interviews with the show’s curator, John Elderfield; the chairman of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Clifford Ross; and the Foundation’s executive director, Elizabeth Smith, provides viewers with an in-depth look at the fourteen paintings included in the exhibition.

Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2019

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2019

The Summer 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Afrylic by Ellen Gallagher on its cover.

Helen Frankenthaler: Sea Change

Helen Frankenthaler: Sea Change

Elizabeth Smith, executive director of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and curator John Elderfield discuss a decade of Frankenthaler’s work on the occasion of her first exhibition of paintings in Rome.

Helen and High Water

Helen and High Water

John Elderfield shares part of his lecture, prepared on the occasion of the exhibition Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown. 

Helen Frankenthaler at the Clark Art Institute

Helen Frankenthaler at the Clark Art Institute

Phyllis Tuchman on the critical role of scale in Frankenthaler’s art practice.

Frankenthaler

Frankenthaler

John Elderfield and Lauren Mahony discuss Helen Frankenthaler and her work from 1959 to 1962.

Helen Frankenthaler painting in her studio.

Helen Frankenthaler: Line into Color, Color into Line

To mark the occasion of the exhibition Line into Color, Color into Line: Helen Frankenthaler, Paintings, 1962–1987, the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation and Gagosian produced a video of rare archival footage of Frankenthaler on the subject of line and color.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Helen Frankenthaler, Eden, 1956, collection Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

In Conversation

Alexander Nemerov
Lise Motherwell

Thursday, March 25, 2021, 6pm EDT

Join Politics and Prose Bookstore for a conversation between art historian Alexander Nemerov and Dr. Lise Motherwell, a licensed psychologist, stepdaughter of Helen Frankenthaler, and the vice president of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation board. The pair will discuss Nemerov’s new book, Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York, which illuminates the rich intellectual and creative life of postwar New York City, where Frankenthaler’s singular career was launched and which fueled its flourishing. To attend the online event, register at www.eventbrite.com.

Helen Frankenthaler, Eden, 1956, collection Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Before the Caves, 1958, University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Sibila Savage

Talk

Alexander Nemerov
Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York

Thursday, March 18, 2021, 7–8pm EDT

Art historian Alexander Nemerov will share stories from his new book, Fierce Poise: Helen Frankenthaler and 1950s New York, illuminating the rich intellectual and creative life of the postwar New York City that launched Helen Frankenthaler’s singular career and fueled its flourishing. From Frankenthaler’s privileged Upper East Side upbringing to her life-altering first encounter with the work of Jackson Pollock to her efforts to chart her own course in a male-dominated art world, Nemerov explores how Frankenthaler came of age as an artist. Celebrating the art itself, he brings fresh insights into the luminous, color-stained, commanding works that made Frankenthaler a pioneer of twentieth-century painting.To attend the event, purchase tickets at www.92y.org.

Helen Frankenthaler, Before the Caves, 1958, University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Sibila Savage

Theaster Gates, American Tapestry, 2019 © Theaster Gates

Art Fair

Art Basel OVR: Pioneers
Innovate, Originate, Overturn: Modern and Contemporary Pioneers

March 24–27, 2021

One of a hundred selected galleries, Gagosian is pleased to present Innovate, Originate, Overturn: Modern and Contemporary Pioneers, an exclusive online project for Art Basel’s launch of OVR: Pioneers. The presentation will include works by Helen FrankenthalerTheaster GatesAndreas GurskyDamien HirstJeff KoonsNam June Paik, and Rachel Whiteread.

Theaster Gates, American Tapestry, 2019 © Theaster Gates

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Museum Exhibitions

On View

Helen Frankenthaler in
Women Take the Floor

Through May 3, 2021
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
www.mfa.org

Women Take the Floor challenges the dominant history of twentieth-century American art by focusing on the overlooked and underrepresented work and stories of women artists. With more than two hundred works drawn primarily from the museum’s collection, the exhibition is organized into seven thematic galleries. Work by Helen Frankenthaler is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Solar Imp, 1995, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Roz Akin

On View

Helen Frankenthaler
Late Works, 1990–2003

Through May 23, 2021
New Britain Museum of American Art, Connecticut
nbmaa.org

Marking the first museum presentation dedicated to the late work of Helen Frankenthaler, this exhibition features twenty-two works on paper dating from 1990 to 2003, some measuring more than six feet. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, Frankenthaler expanded the possibilities of abstract painting while referencing figuration and landscape in unique ways. In later years, her practice continued to evolve through her use of diverse media and processes, as she shifted from painting canvas on the floor to using larger sheets of paper that were laid out on the floor or on tabletops for easier accessibility. The continuity, in terms of content and execution, between the late work (post-1990) and what came before is striking. Graced with memorable encounters, a vast art historical image bank, and technical prowess, the aging artist moved in whatever direction suited her mood and imagination.

Helen Frankenthaler, Solar Imp, 1995, Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Roz Akin

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957 © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Helen Frankenthaler

Through November 2021
Tate Modern, London
www.tate.org.uk

Tate Modern presents five works by Helen Frankenthaler, ranging in date from 1951 to 1977, on loan from the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York. The display marks the artist’s first extensive museum presentation in London since 1969.

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957 © 2019 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Lorelei, 1957, Brooklyn Museum, New York © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Closed

Helen Frankenthaler in
Out of Place: A Feminist Look at the Collection

January 24–September 13, 2020
Brooklyn Museum, New York
www.brooklynmuseum.org

Out of Place presents the work of forty-four artists whose practices engender a broader and more dynamic view of modern and contemporary art. By featuring works that have routinely been regarded as “out of place” in major museums, the exhibition examines how artists can transform long-held cultural assumptions. Work by Helen Frankenthaler is included.

Helen Frankenthaler, Lorelei, 1957, Brooklyn Museum, New York © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

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Press

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