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Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler, Painted on 21st Street, 1950 Oil, sand, plaster of Paris, and coffee grounds on sized, primed canvas, 69 ⅛ × 97 inches (175.6 × 246.4 cm), Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Painted on 21st Street, 1950

Oil, sand, plaster of Paris, and coffee grounds on sized, primed canvas, 69 ⅛ × 97 inches (175.6 × 246.4 cm), Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1951 Oil and enamel on sized, primed canvas, 56 ⅜ × 84 ½ inches (143.2 × 214.6 cm), Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1951

Oil and enamel on sized, primed canvas, 56 ⅜ × 84 ½ inches (143.2 × 214.6 cm), Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Mountains and Sea, 1952 Oil and charcoal on unsized, unprimed canvas, 86 ⅜ × 117 ¼ inches (219.4 × 297.8 cm), Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York, on extended loan to the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Mountains and Sea, 1952

Oil and charcoal on unsized, unprimed canvas, 86 ⅜ × 117 ¼ inches (219.4 × 297.8 cm), Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, New York, on extended loan to the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Open Wall, 1953 Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 53 ¾ × 131 inches (136.5 × 332.7 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Open Wall, 1953

Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 53 ¾ × 131 inches (136.5 × 332.7 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Trojan Gates, 1955 Oil and enamel on sized, primed canvas, 72 × 48 ⅞ inches (182.9 × 124.1 cm), Museum of Modern Art, New York© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Trojan Gates, 1955

Oil and enamel on sized, primed canvas, 72 × 48 ⅞ inches (182.9 × 124.1 cm), Museum of Modern Art, New York
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957 Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 70 × 54 ½ inches (177.8 × 138.4 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Europa, 1957

Oil on unsized, unprimed canvas, 70 × 54 ½ inches (177.8 × 138.4 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Madridscape, 1958 Charcoal, crayon, watercolor, and ink on paper, 25 ¼ × 34 ½ inches (64.1 × 87.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Madridscape, 1958

Charcoal, crayon, watercolor, and ink on paper, 25 ¼ × 34 ½ inches (64.1 × 87.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, First Creatures, 1959 Oil, enamel, charcoal, and pencil on sized, primed canvas, 64 ¾ × 111 inches (164.5 × 281.9 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, First Creatures, 1959

Oil, enamel, charcoal, and pencil on sized, primed canvas, 64 ¾ × 111 inches (164.5 × 281.9 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1959–60 Oil and charcoal on sized, primed linen, 89 ¾ × 69 ¾ inches (228 × 177.2 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1959–60

Oil and charcoal on sized, primed linen, 89 ¾ × 69 ¾ inches (228 × 177.2 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, May Scene, 1961 Oil on sized, primed linen, 35 ⅞ × 59 ⅞ inches (91.1 × 152.1 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, May Scene, 1961

Oil on sized, primed linen, 35 ⅞ × 59 ⅞ inches (91.1 × 152.1 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Celebration Bouquet, 1962 Oil on sized, primed linen, 13 ⅜ × 29 ⅜ inches (34 × 74.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Celebration Bouquet, 1962

Oil on sized, primed linen, 13 ⅜ × 29 ⅜ inches (34 × 74.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Cool Summer, 1962 Oil on canvas, 69 ¾ × 120 inches (177.2 × 304.8 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Cool Summer, 1962

Oil on canvas, 69 ¾ × 120 inches (177.2 × 304.8 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Milkwood Arcade, 1963 Acrylic on canvas, 86 ½ × 80 ¾ inches (219.7 × 205.1 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Milkwood Arcade, 1963

Acrylic on canvas, 86 ½ × 80 ¾ inches (219.7 × 205.1 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Provincetown Window, 1963–64 Acrylic on canvas, 82 ⅜ × 81 ⅞ inches (209.2 × 208 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Provincetown Window, 1963–64

Acrylic on canvas, 82 ⅜ × 81 ⅞ inches (209.2 × 208 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Square Field, 1966 Acrylic on canvas, 22 × 28 inches (55.9 × 71.1 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Tim Pyle

Helen Frankenthaler, Square Field, 1966

Acrylic on canvas, 22 × 28 inches (55.9 × 71.1 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Tim Pyle

Helen Frankenthaler, The Human Edge, 1967 Acrylic on canvas, 124 × 93 ¼ inches (315 × 236.9 cm), Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: courtesy Everson Museum of Art

Helen Frankenthaler, The Human Edge, 1967

Acrylic on canvas, 124 × 93 ¼ inches (315 × 236.9 cm), Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, New York
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: courtesy Everson Museum of Art

Helen Frankenthaler, Sesame, 1970 Acrylic on canvas, 106 × 82 ½ inches (269.2 × 209.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Sesame, 1970

Acrylic on canvas, 106 × 82 ½ inches (269.2 × 209.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Nature Abhors a Vaccum, 1973 Acrylic on canvas, 103 ½ × 112 inches (262.9 × 284.5 cm), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Nature Abhors a Vaccum, 1973

Acrylic on canvas, 103 ½ × 112 inches (262.9 × 284.5 cm), National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Savage Breeze, 1974 8-color woodcut from 8 woodblocks on handmade paper, 31 ½ × 27 inches (80 × 68.6 cm), Williams College Museum of Art, Massachusetts© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), West Islip, LI, New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Savage Breeze, 1974

8-color woodcut from 8 woodblocks on handmade paper, 31 ½ × 27 inches (80 × 68.6 cm), Williams College Museum of Art, Massachusetts
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE), West Islip, LI, New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Rapunzel, 1974 Acrylic on canvas, 108 × 81 inches (274.3 × 205.7 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Rapunzel, 1974

Acrylic on canvas, 108 × 81 inches (274.3 × 205.7 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Sentry, 1976 Acrylic on canvas, 114 × 90 inches (289.6 × 228.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Sentry, 1976

Acrylic on canvas, 114 × 90 inches (289.6 × 228.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Mineral Kingdom, 1976 Acrylic on canvas, 69 × 108 ½ inches (175.3 × 275.6 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Mineral Kingdom, 1976

Acrylic on canvas, 69 × 108 ½ inches (175.3 × 275.6 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Grey Fireworks, 1982 Acrylic on canvas, 72 × 118 ½ inches (182.9 × 301 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Grey Fireworks, 1982

Acrylic on canvas, 72 × 118 ½ inches (182.9 × 301 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Covent Garden Study: Final Maquette for Set, Third Movement, Royal Ballet Number Three, 1984 Acrylic on canvas, 16 ⅛ × 28 ¾ inches (41 × 73 cm), Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Covent Garden Study: Final Maquette for Set, Third Movement, Royal Ballet Number Three, 1984

Acrylic on canvas, 16 ⅛ × 28 ¾ inches (41 × 73 cm), Kettle’s Yard, University of Cambridge
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Columbine, 1985 Acrylic on canvas, 81 ¼ × 48 ¾ inches (206.4 × 123.8 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Columbine, 1985

Acrylic on canvas, 81 ¼ × 48 ¾ inches (206.4 × 123.8 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Syzygy, 1987 Acrylic on canvas, 88 ¼ × 59 ½ inches (224.2 × 151.1 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Syzygy, 1987

Acrylic on canvas, 88 ¼ × 59 ½ inches (224.2 × 151.1 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Gateway, 1982–88 (recto) Recto: lost-wax bronze casting with applied patinas and 28-color intaglio print with etching, relief, and aquatint, with borders hand stenciled on three sheets; verso: 3 sandblasted bronze panels hand painted by the artist with a mixture of chemicals, pigments, and dyes; 81 × 107 × 4 ½ inches (205.7 × 271.8 × 11.4 cm); edition 6/12; cast at Tallix Foundry, Beacon, New York, printed and published at Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, NY© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd. 1987

Helen Frankenthaler, Gateway, 1982–88 (recto)

Recto: lost-wax bronze casting with applied patinas and 28-color intaglio print with etching, relief, and aquatint, with borders hand stenciled on three sheets; verso: 3 sandblasted bronze panels hand painted by the artist with a mixture of chemicals, pigments, and dyes; 81 × 107 × 4 ½ inches (205.7 × 271.8 × 11.4 cm); edition 6/12; cast at Tallix Foundry, Beacon, New York, printed and published at Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, NY
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd. 1987

Helen Frankenthaler, Gateway, 1982–88 (verso) Recto: lost-wax bronze casting with applied patinas and 28-color intaglio print with etching, relief, and aquatint, with borders hand stenciled on three sheets; verso: 3 sandblasted bronze panels hand painted by the artist with a mixture of chemicals, pigments, and dyes; 81 × 107 × 4 ½ inches (205.7 × 271.8 × 11.4 cm); edition 6/12; cast at Tallix Foundry, Beacon, New York, printed and published at Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, NY© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd. 1987

Helen Frankenthaler, Gateway, 1982–88 (verso)

Recto: lost-wax bronze casting with applied patinas and 28-color intaglio print with etching, relief, and aquatint, with borders hand stenciled on three sheets; verso: 3 sandblasted bronze panels hand painted by the artist with a mixture of chemicals, pigments, and dyes; 81 × 107 × 4 ½ inches (205.7 × 271.8 × 11.4 cm); edition 6/12; cast at Tallix Foundry, Beacon, New York, printed and published at Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, NY
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Tyler Graphics Ltd. 1987

Helen Frankenthaler, Flirt, 1995 Acrylic on paper, 60 ½ × 89 ½ inches (153.7 × 227.3 cm)© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Flirt, 1995

Acrylic on paper, 60 ½ × 89 ½ inches (153.7 × 227.3 cm)
© 2018 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

About

A line, color, shapes, spaces, all do one thing for and within themselves, and yet do something else, in relation to everything that is going on within the four sides [of the canvas]. A line is a line, but [also] is a color. . . . It does this here, but that there. The canvas surface is flat and yet the space extends for miles. What a lie, what trickery—how beautiful is the very idea of painting.
—Helen Frankenthaler

Helen Frankenthaler (1928–2011), whose career spanned six decades, has long been recognized as one of the great American artists of the twentieth century. A member of the second generation of postwar American abstract painters, she is widely credited with playing a pivotal role in the transition from Abstract Expressionism to Color Field painting. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, she expanded the possibilities of abstraction, while at times referencing figuration and landscape in highly personal ways. She produced a body of work whose impact on contemporary art has been profound and continues to grow.

Frankenthaler was born on December 12, 1928, and raised in New York. She attended the Dalton School, where she received her earliest art instruction from Rufino Tamayo. In 1949 she graduated from Bennington College, Vermont, where she was a student of Paul Feeley, following which she studied briefly with Hans Hofmann.

Frankenthaler exhibited her work professionally for the first time in 1950, at the Kootz Gallery in New York, when Adolph Gottlieb selected her painting Beach (1950) for inclusion in Fifteen Unknowns: Selected by Artists of the Kootz Gallery. Her first solo exhibition was presented in 1951, at New York’s Tibor de Nagy Gallery, and that year she was also included in the landmark 9th St. Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture in New York.

In 1952 Frankenthaler created Mountains and Sea, her breakthrough soak-stain painting. She poured thinned paint directly onto raw, unprimed canvas laid on the studio floor, working from all sides to create floating fields of translucent color. Mountains and Sea was immediately influential for the artists who formed the Color Field school of painting, notable among them Morris Louis and Kenneth Noland.

As early as 1959 Frankenthaler began to be a regular presence in major international exhibitions. That year she won first prize at the Première Biennale de Paris, and in 1966 she represented the United States at the 33rd Biennale di Venezia, alongside Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, and Jules Olitski. She had her first museum retrospective in 1960, at New York’s Jewish Museum, and her second in 1969, at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, followed by an international tour. Additional museum retrospectives have been held at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and touring venues (1985, works on paper); Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas, and touring venues, including Museum of Modern Art, New York (1989, paintings); National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, and touring venues (1993, prints); Naples Museum of Art, Florida, and touring venues, including Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut (2002, woodcuts); and Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, Florida, and touring venue, Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh, Scotland (2003, works on paper).

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Helen Frankenthaler

Photo: Alexander Liberman © J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles

Katy Hessel, Matthew Holman, and Eleanor Nairne

In Conversation
Katy Hessel, Matthew Holman, and Eleanor Nairne on Helen Frankenthaler

Broadcaster and art historian Katy Hessel; Matthew Holman, associate lecturer in English at University College London; and Eleanor Nairne, curator at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, discuss Helen Frankenthaler’s early training, the development of her signature soak-stain technique and subsequent shifts in style, and her connections to the London art world.

Helen Frankenthaler, Heart of London Map, steel sculpture

Helen Frankenthaler: A Painter’s Sculptures

On the occasion of four exhibitions in London exploring different aspects of Helen Frankenthaler’s work, Lauren Mahony introduces texts by the sculptor Anthony Caro and by the artist herself on her relatively unfamiliar first body of sculpture, made in the summer of 1972 in Caro’s London studio.

Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006), on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Summer 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2021

The Summer 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006) on its cover.

Augurs of Spring

Augurs of Spring

As spring approaches in the Northern Hemisphere, Sydney Stutterheim reflects on the iconography and symbolism of the season in art both past and present.

Helen Frankenthaler, Cool Summer, 1962, oil on canvas, 69 ¾ × 120 inches (177.2 × 304.8 cm), Collection Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.

Building a Legacy
The Helen Frankenthaler Foundation on COVID-19 Relief Funding

The Quarterly’s Alison McDonald speaks with Clifford Ross, Frederick J. Iseman, and Dr. Lise Motherwell, members of the board of directors of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and Elizabeth Smith, executive director, about the foundation’s decision to establish a multiyear initiative dedicated to providing $5 million in covid-19 relief for artists and arts professionals.

A portrait of Betty Parsons surrounded by art.

Game Changer
Betty Parsons

Wyatt Allgeier pays homage to the renowned gallerist and artist Betty Parsons (1900–1982).

Helen Frankenthaler in her studio in Provincetown. Black and white image.

Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown

Lise Motherwell, a stepdaughter of Helen Frankenthaler and vice president of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and Elizabeth Smith, executive director of the Foundation, recently cocurated an exhibition of the artist’s work entitled Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown. Here they discuss the origin of the exhibition, the relationship between the artist’s work and her summers spent in Provincetown, and the presentations at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, in 2018, and the Parrish Art Museum, Water Mill, New York, in 2019.

Helen Frankenthaler, Riverhead, 1963 (detail).

Frankenthaler

On the occasion of the exhibition Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992, at the Museo di Palazzo Grimani in Venice, Italy, art historians John Elderfield and Pepe Karmel discuss the concept of the panorama in relation to the artist’s work. Their conversation traces developments in Frankenthaler’s approach to composition, the boundaries and conventions of abstraction, and how, in many ways, her career continually challenged established theories of art history.

Helen Frankenthaler in gondola with various friends, Venice, June 1966

Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992

Pittura/Panorama: Paintings by Helen Frankenthaler, 1952–1992 marks the first time that Frankenthaler’s paintings have been exhibited in Venice since her inclusion in the 1966 Biennale as part of the US Pavilion. This video, including interviews with the show’s curator, John Elderfield; the chairman of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Clifford Ross; and the Foundation’s executive director, Elizabeth Smith, provides viewers with an in-depth look at the fourteen paintings included in the exhibition.

Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2019

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2019

The Summer 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Afrylic by Ellen Gallagher on its cover.

Helen Frankenthaler: Sea Change

Helen Frankenthaler: Sea Change

Elizabeth Smith, executive director of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, and curator John Elderfield discuss a decade of Frankenthaler’s work on the occasion of her first exhibition of paintings in Rome.

Helen and High Water

Helen and High Water

John Elderfield shares part of his lecture, prepared on the occasion of the exhibition Abstract Climates: Helen Frankenthaler in Provincetown. 

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Miami Beach 2021. Artwork, left to right: © Albert Oehlen; © Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano

Art Fair

Art Basel Miami Beach 2021

December 2–4, 2021, Booth D5
Miami Beach Convention Center
artbasel.com

Gagosian is pleased to announce its participation in Art Basel Miami Beach 2021 with a presentation of modern and contemporary works. A selection of these works will also appear on gagosian.com and on Art Basel’s Online Viewing Room.

To receive a pdf with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com. To attend the fair, purchase tickets at artbasel.com.

Gagosian’s booth at Art Basel Miami Beach 2021. Artwork, left to right: © Albert Oehlen; © Judd Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Sebastiano Pellion di Persano

Tetsuya Ishida, Untitled (Planting Trees), 2000 © Estate of Tetsuya Ishida

Art Fair

West Bund Art & Design 2021

November 12–14, 2021, booth A102
West Bund Art Center, Shanghai
westbundshanghai.com

Gagosian is pleased to participate in the eighth edition of West Bund Art & Design. The gallery will present works by Balthus, Georg Baselitz, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Glenn Brown, Helen Frankenthaler, Katharina Grosse, Mark Grotjahn, Damien Hirst, Thomas Houseago, Tetsuya Ishida, Alex Israel, Takashi Murakami, Albert Oehlen, Nam June Paik, Sterling Ruby, Ed Ruscha, Rudolf Stingel, Spencer Sweeney, Zao Wou-Ki, and Zeng Fanzhi, among others.

To receive a pdf with detailed information on the works, please contact the gallery at inquire@gagosian.com.

Tetsuya Ishida, Untitled (Planting Trees), 2000 © Estate of Tetsuya Ishida

Jonas Wood, Clipping Plate, 2021 © Jonas Wood

Fundraiser

Artist Plate Project 2021
Coalition for the Homeless

Launching November 16, 2021, 10am est

Limited-edition bone china plates produced by Prospect and featuring artwork by more than forty artists—including Virgil Abloh, Urs Fischer, Helen Frankenthaler, Alex Israel, Ewa Juszkiewicz, Ed Ruscha, Sarah Sze, Tom Wesselmann, Jonas Wood, and Christopher Wool—will be sold through Artware Editions to raise funds for the Coalition’s lifesaving programs. The funds raised by the sale of the plates will provide food, crisis services, housing, and other critical aid to thousands of people experiencing homelessness and instability. The purchase of one plate can feed one hundred homeless and hungry New Yorkers.

Jonas Wood, Clipping Plate, 2021 © Jonas Wood

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Museum Exhibitions

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1967, Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Chiron Press, New York

On View

Without Limits
Helen Frankenthaler, Abstraction, and the Language of Print

Through February 20, 2022
Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas at Austin
blantonmuseum.org

Without Limits celebrates the generous gift from the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation to the Blanton Museum of Art of ten prints and six proofs that span five decades of the artist’s career. Frankenthaler began creating prints in 1961, approaching lithography, screen printing, etching, and woodcut printing with curiosity and vision. Collaborating with master printmakers at studios such as Universal Limited Art Editions (ulae), Mixografia, and Tyler Graphics, Ltd., she contributed to a printmaking renaissance in the mid-twentieth century. Her work is presented alongside prints by other artists in the Blanton’s collection who also use the medium to capture and translate their own abstract visions.

Helen Frankenthaler, Untitled, 1967, Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the Helen Frankenthaler Foundation © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/Chiron Press, New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Stella Polaris, 1990 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View

Helen Frankenthaler
Late Works, 1990–2003

Through February 27, 2022
Palm Springs Art Museum, California
www.psmuseum.org

Marking the first museum presentation dedicated to the late work of Helen Frankenthaler, this exhibition features ten paintings and twenty works on paper dating from 1990 to 2003, some measuring more than six feet. Through her invention of the soak-stain technique, Frankenthaler expanded the possibilities of abstract painting while referencing figuration and landscape in unique ways. In later years, her practice continued to evolve through her use of diverse media and processes, as she shifted from painting canvas on the floor to using larger sheets of paper that were laid out on the floor or on tabletops for easier accessibility. The continuity, in terms of content and execution, between the late work (post-1990) and what came before is striking. Graced with memorable encounters, a vast art historical image bank, and technical prowess, the aging artist moved in whatever direction suited her mood and imagination. This exhibition originated at the New Britain Museum of American Art in Connecticut.

Helen Frankenthaler, Stella Polaris, 1990 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Cameo, 1980 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./DACS/Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, New York

On View

Helen Frankenthaler
Radical Beauty

Through April 18, 2022
Dulwich Picture Gallery, London
www.dulwichpicturegallery.org.uk

Radical Beauty presents Helen Frankenthaler’s groundbreaking woodcuts, which appear painterly and spontaneous with expanses of color and fluid forms. The exhibition reveals Frankenthaler as a trailblazer of the mid-century printmaking renaissance among American abstract artists, endlessly pushing the possibilities of the medium through experimentation. Highlights of the exhibition include East and Beyond (1973), created by printing onto multiple blocks to avoid negative space, and Cameo (1980), in which Frankenthaler introduced a new layered approach to color using her “guzzying” technique, where she worked surfaces with sandpaper and dental tools to achieve different effects.

Helen Frankenthaler, Cameo, 1980 © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./DACS/Tyler Graphics Ltd., Bedford Village, New York

Francis Bacon, Study for a Portrait, 1967, Seattle Art Museum © The Estate of Francis Bacon. Photo: Spike Mafford

On View

Frisson
The Richard E. Lang and Jane Lang Davis Collection

Through November 27, 2022
Seattle Art Museum
www.seattleartmuseum.org

This exhibition celebrates the Friday Foundation’s gift of nineteen artworks from the Lang Collection to the Seattle Art Museum in honor of Seattle collectors Richard E. Lang and Jane Lang Davis. Dating from 1945 to 1976, the paintings, drawings, and sculptures in Frisson represent mature works and pivotal moments of artistic development from some of the most influential American and European artists of the postwar period. Work by Francis Bacon, Willem de Kooning, Helen Frankenthaler, and Alberto Giacometti is included.  

Francis Bacon, Study for a Portrait, 1967, Seattle Art Museum © The Estate of Francis Bacon. Photo: Spike Mafford

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Press

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