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Exhibition

Pop Minimalism
Minimalist Pop

Opening reception: Tuesday, December 4, 5–8pm
December 5–9, 2018
Moore Building, Miami

On the occasion of Art Basel Miami Beach 2018, Gagosian and Jeffrey Deitch are pleased to present Pop Minimalism | Minimalist Pop, their fourth collaboration at the Moore Building in the Miami Design District. This group exhibition explores the intersections and legacies of two major American art movements of the 1960s—Pop art and Minimalism—and the ways in which features of Minimalism have been incorporated into a variety of contemporary art practices. While these two art movements are typically seen to represent opposing artistic responses to the legacy of Abstract Expressionism, the work in Pop Minimalism | Minimalist Pop highlights points of common conceptual approaches and mutual exchange. Work by Jeff Koons, Adam McEwen, Sarah Morris, and Richard Prince is included. 

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Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature #4, 1971 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Entablature #4, 1971 © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

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metrograph.com

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