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Cy Twombly

Sculpture

September 30–December 21, 2019
Grosvenor Hill, London

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Works Exhibited

Cy Twombly, Chariot of Triumph, 1990–98 Wood, paint, cloth, and nails, 42 ½ × 20 ⅞ × 74 ⅜ inches (108 × 53 × 189 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Chariot of Triumph, 1990–98

Wood, paint, cloth, and nails, 42 ½ × 20 ⅞ × 74 ⅜ inches (108 × 53 × 189 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (St. Sebastian), 1998 Bronze, 50 ⅜ × 9 ⅛ × 7 ½ inches (128 × 23 × 19 cm), edition 1/3© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (St. Sebastian), 1998

Bronze, 50 ⅜ × 9 ⅛ × 7 ½ inches (128 × 23 × 19 cm), edition 1/3
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Turkish Delight, 2000 Wood, plaster, acrylic, and brass, 45 ½ × 18 × 16 ½ inches (115.6 × 45.7 × 41.9 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Turkish Delight, 2000

Wood, plaster, acrylic, and brass, 45 ½ × 18 × 16 ½ inches (115.6 × 45.7 × 41.9 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2002 Plaster, wood, paint, acrylic, and sand, 25 ⅝ × 9 ⅝ × 8 ¼ inches (65 × 24.5 × 20.8 cm)© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2002

Plaster, wood, paint, acrylic, and sand, 25 ⅝ × 9 ⅝ × 8 ¼ inches (65 × 24.5 × 20.8 cm)
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004 Bronze, 31 ⅞ × 15 ¼ × 11 ⅝ inches (81 × 38.5 × 29.5 cm), edition 4/6© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004

Bronze, 31 ⅞ × 15 ¼ × 11 ⅝ inches (81 × 38.5 × 29.5 cm), edition 4/6
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Humpty Dumpty), 2004 Bronze, 28 ¾ × 19 ⅜ × 19 ⅜ inches (73 × 49 × 49 cm), edition 1/4© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Humpty Dumpty), 2004

Bronze, 28 ¾ × 19 ⅜ × 19 ⅜ inches (73 × 49 × 49 cm), edition 1/4
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2009 Bronze, 94 ¾ × 15 ⅞ × 12 ⅜ inches (240.4 × 40.3 × 31.5 cm), edition 2/3© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2009

Bronze, 94 ¾ × 15 ⅞ × 12 ⅜ inches (240.4 × 40.3 × 31.5 cm), edition 2/3
© Cy Twombly Foundation

About

White paint is my marble.
—Cy Twombly

Gagosian is pleased to present an exhibition of Cy Twombly’s sculptures, in association with the Cy Twombly Foundation. The exhibition marks the publication of the second volume of the catalogue raisonné of sculptures, edited by Nicola Del Roscio, President of the Cy Twombly Foundation, and published by Schirmer/Mosel.

Twombly made his sculptures from found materials such as plaster, wood, and iron, as well as objects that he habitually used and handled in the studio. From 1946 onward, he created many assemblages, though they were rarely exhibited before the 1997 publication of the first volume of his catalogue raisonné. Often modest in scale, they embody his artistic language of handwritten glyphs and symbols, evoking narratives from antiquity and fragments of literature and poetry.

Many of Twombly’s sculptures are coated in white paint, which unifies and neutralizes the assembled materials and renders the newly formed object into a coherent whole. In referring to white paint as his “marble,” Twombly recalls traditions of Egyptian, Greek, and Roman sculpture while also subverting marble’s classical connotation of perfection through his roughly painted surfaces. The intimate scale of these works, together with their textural coats of paint, underscores their fundamentally haptic nature.

Read more

Black and white image of the interior of Cy Twombly’s apartment in Rome

Cy Twombly: Making Past Present

In 2020, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, announced their plan for a survey of Cy Twombly’s artwork alongside selections from their permanent ancient Greek and Roman collection. The survey was postponed due to the lockdowns necessitated by the coronavirus pandemic, but was revived in 2022 with a presentation at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles from August 2 through October 30. In 2023, the exhibition will arrive at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The curator for the exhibition, Christine Kondoleon, and Kate Nesin, author of Cy Twombly’s Things (2014) and advisor for the show, speak with Gagosian director Mark Francis about the origin of the exhibition and the aesthetic and poetic resonances that give the show its title: Making Past Present.

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Say Goodbye, Catallus, to the Shores of Asia Minor), 1994, oil, acrylic, oil stick, crayon, and graphite on three canvases,

Say Goodbye, Catullus, to the Shores of Asia Minor

Thierry Greub tracks the literary references in Cy Twomblys epic painting of 1994.

Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006), on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Summer 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2021

The Summer 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Carrie Mae Weems’s The Louvre (2006) on its cover.

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1990, acrylic, wax crayon, and pencil on handmade paper, 30 ⅝ × 21 ⅝ inches (77.8 × 54.8 cm)

Twombly and the Poets

Anne Boyer, the inaugural winner of the Cy Twombly Award in Poetry, composes a poem in response to TwomblyAristaeus Mourning the Loss of His Bees (1973) and introduces a portfolio of the painters works accompanied by the poems that inspired them.

Gerhard Richter’s Helen (1963) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Spring 2021

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2021

The Spring 2021 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Gerhard Richter’s Helen (1963) on its cover.

Rainer Maria Rilke, 1928. Photo: Lou Andreas-Salomé

Rainer Maria Rilke: Duino Elegies

Bobbie Sheng explores the symbiotic relationship between the poet and visual artists of his time and tracks the enduring influence of his poetry on artists working today.

News

Cy Twombly: Sculpture (London: Gagosian, 2019)

Online Reading

Cy Twombly
Sculpture

Cy Twombly: Sculpture is available for online reading from November 1 through November 30 as part of the From the Library series. The book documents a 2019 exhibition at Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London, which brought together important and rarely shown sculptures by the artist. Twombly made his sculptures from found materials such as plaster, wood, and iron, as well as objects that he habitually used and handled in the studio. Often modest in scale, they embody his artistic language of handwritten glyphs and symbols, evoking narratives from antiquity and fragments of literature and poetry. The book includes a conversation between Nicola Del Roscio, president of the Cy Twombly Foundation; art historian and curator Sir Nicholas Serota; and Gagosian director Mark Francis.

Cy Twombly: Sculpture (London: Gagosian, 2019)

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004 © Cy Twombly Foundation

Tour

Cy Twombly
Sculpture

Wednesday, December 4, 2019, 6:15pm
Gagosian, Grosvenor Hill, London

Join Gagosian for a tour of Cy Twombly: Sculpture, currently on view at Grosvenor Hill, London. The exhibition, presented in association with the Cy Twombly Foundation, marks the publication of the second volume of the catalogue raisonné of Twombly’s sculptures edited by Nicola Del Roscio and published by Schirmer/Mosel. Gagosian’s Alice Godwin will lead the tour, providing an overview of the materials, processes, and influences behind the artist’s sculptural works. To attend the free event, RSVP to londontours@gagosian.com. Space is limited.

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004 © Cy Twombly Foundation

Photo: Ben McKee

In Conversation

Edmund de Waal and Christine Kondoleon on Cy Twombly

Friday, October 4, 2019, 3pm
Regent’s Park, London
frieze.com

As part of the Frieze Masters Talks program, Edmund de Waal will discuss the work of Cy Twombly with Christine Kondoleon of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. De Waal has a particular affinity for Twombly’s ability to create works that are simultaneously personal and mythological, allowing narrative, language, and inner visions to erupt from his intimate, abstract notations. To attend the free event, register at the Frieze Masters auditorium desk the day of the talk.

Photo: Ben McKee

Cy Twombly, Îles des Saintes, Guadeloupe, 1979. Photo © Fondazione Nicola Del Roscio, courtesy Archives Nicola Del Roscio

Screening

Cy Twombly
Cy Dear

Friday, October 4, 2019, 6:30–8:30pm
National Portrait Gallery, London
www.npg.org.uk

Cy Dear (2018), a film that traces the life and work of Cy Twombly, will be screened at the National Portrait Gallery as part of the museum’s Friday Lates program. The documentary pays homage to the artist’s prolific career, looking closely at his work around the world and the different creative periods within his oeuvre. To attend the event, purchase tickets at www.npg.org.uk.

Cy Twombly, Îles des Saintes, Guadeloupe, 1979. Photo © Fondazione Nicola Del Roscio, courtesy Archives Nicola Del Roscio