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What’s Modern?

November 6–December 18, 2004
980 Madison Avenue, New York

Richard Artschwager, Geo. W. Bush, 2002 Acrylic, fiber panel on celotex in artist's frame, 26 × 20 inches (66 × 50.8 cm)

Richard Artschwager, Geo. W. Bush, 2002

Acrylic, fiber panel on celotex in artist's frame, 26 × 20 inches (66 × 50.8 cm)

Francis Bacon, Study of Gerard Schürmann, 1969 Oil on canvas, 13 ⅝ × 11 ⅝ inches (34.6 × 29.5 cm)

Francis Bacon, Study of Gerard Schürmann, 1969

Oil on canvas, 13 ⅝ × 11 ⅝ inches (34.6 × 29.5 cm)

John Baldessari, A 1968 Painting, 1968 Acrylic and photo-emulsion on canvas, 59 × 45 inches (149.9 × 114.3 cm)

John Baldessari, A 1968 Painting, 1968

Acrylic and photo-emulsion on canvas, 59 × 45 inches (149.9 × 114.3 cm)

Alexander Calder, Fish, 1952 Hanging mobile of painted steel rod, wire, string, colored glass and metal objects, 15 ½ × 45 ½ inches (39.4 × 115.6 cm)

Alexander Calder, Fish, 1952

Hanging mobile of painted steel rod, wire, string, colored glass and metal objects, 15 ½ × 45 ½ inches (39.4 × 115.6 cm)

Paul Cézanne, Femme Assise, 1893–94 Oil on canvas, 22 × 18 inches (55 × 46 cm)

Paul Cézanne, Femme Assise, 1893–94

Oil on canvas, 22 × 18 inches (55 × 46 cm)

Willem de Kooning, Seated Woman on a Bench, 1972 Bronze, 37 ¾ × 36 × 34 ⅜ inches (95.9 × 91.4 × 87.3 cm), edition of 7

Willem de Kooning, Seated Woman on a Bench, 1972

Bronze, 37 ¾ × 36 × 34 ⅜ inches (95.9 × 91.4 × 87.3 cm), edition of 7

Alberto Giacometti, Man Crossing a Square (Homme traversant une place), 1949 Bronze, 26 ¾ × 31 ½ × 20 ½ inches (67.9 × 80 × 52.1 cm)

Alberto Giacometti, Man Crossing a Square (Homme traversant une place), 1949

Bronze, 26 ¾ × 31 ½ × 20 ½ inches (67.9 × 80 × 52.1 cm)

Damien Hirst, Love Affair, 2001 Household gloss paint and butterflies on canvas, 100 ⅜ × 69 ⅜ inches (254.9 × 176.2 cm)

Damien Hirst, Love Affair, 2001

Household gloss paint and butterflies on canvas, 100 ⅜ × 69 ⅜ inches (254.9 × 176.2 cm)

Jasper Johns, Untitled, 1980 Oil on vellum on canvas, 30 ⅜ × 54 ⅜ inches (77.2 × 138.1 cm)

Jasper Johns, Untitled, 1980

Oil on vellum on canvas, 30 ⅜ × 54 ⅜ inches (77.2 × 138.1 cm)

Jeff Koons, Winter Bears, 1988 Polychromed wood, 48 × 44 × 15 ½ inches (121.9 × 111.8 × 39.4 cm), edition of 3

Jeff Koons, Winter Bears, 1988

Polychromed wood, 48 × 44 × 15 ½ inches (121.9 × 111.8 × 39.4 cm), edition of 3

Roy Lichtenstein, Nude with Abstract Painting, 1994 Oil and Magna on canvas, 60 × 82 inches (152.4 × 208.3 cm)

Roy Lichtenstein, Nude with Abstract Painting, 1994

Oil and Magna on canvas, 60 × 82 inches (152.4 × 208.3 cm)

Pablo Picasso, La Femme Enciente, 1950 Bronze, 41 ¼ × 7 ⅝ × 6 ¼ inches (104.8 × 19.4 × 15.9 cm), edition of 6

Pablo Picasso, La Femme Enciente, 1950

Bronze, 41 ¼ × 7 ⅝ × 6 ¼ inches (104.8 × 19.4 × 15.9 cm), edition of 6

Richard Prince, All I've Heard, 1989 Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 96 × 75 inches (243.8 × 190.5 cm)

Richard Prince, All I've Heard, 1989

Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 96 × 75 inches (243.8 × 190.5 cm)

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome), 1961 Oil, crayon and graphite on canvas, 51 ¼ × 59 ¼ inches (130.2 × 150.5 cm)

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome), 1961

Oil, crayon and graphite on canvas, 51 ¼ × 59 ¼ inches (130.2 × 150.5 cm)

Andy Warhol, Mao, 1973 Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 50 × 42 inches (127 × 106.7 cm)

Andy Warhol, Mao, 1973

Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 50 × 42 inches (127 × 106.7 cm)

About

Gagosian is pleased to present the exhibition What’s Modern?, a survey of historic and contemporary works that extensively explores the modernist movement. Scheduled to coincide with the reopening of the Museum of Modern Art’s Manhattan location, this show examines the scope and influence of modernism beginning with the nineteenth century, following its transitions through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

What’s Modern? highlights the work of thirty major artists, celebrating almost two centuries of art created since the explosion of modernism. From its genesis with Cézanne and Picasso, to the postwar abstraction of de Kooning and Pollock, to the contemporary bearers of modernism’s long-lasting influence, this exhibition seeks to investigate the extent to which the notion of modernism has persisted in the history of art. What’s Modern? traces the timeline of modernism and will explore the means by which artists since the nineteenth century have challenged convention and become “modern” through abstraction, expression, and appropriation.

Artists included in this exhibition: Richard Artschwager, Francis Bacon, John Baldessari, Constantin Brancusi, Alexander Calder, Maurizio Cattelan, Paul Cézanne, Salvador Dalí, Willem de Kooning, Marcel Duchamp, Alberto Giacometti, Damien Hirst, Neil Jenney, Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Richard Prince, Robert Rauschenberg, Gerhard Richter, Mark Rothko, Ed Ruscha, David Salle, Julian Schnabel, Georges Seurat, Frank Stella, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol

A fully illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition.

Ed Ruscha, At That, 2020, dry pigment and acrylic on paper.

“Things Fall Apart”: Ed Ruscha’s Swiped Words

Lisa Turvey examines the range of effects conveyed by the blurred phrases in recent drawings by the artist, detailing the ways these words in motion evoke the experience of the current moment.

Alexander Calder poster for McGovern, 1972, lithograph

The Art History of Presidential Campaign Posters

Against the backdrop of the 2020 US presidential election, historian Hal Wert takes us through the artistic and political evolution of American campaign posters, from their origin in 1844 to the present. In an interview with Quarterly editor Gillian Jakab, Wert highlights an array of landmark posters and the artists who made them.

Allen Midgette in front of the Chelsea Hotel, New York, 2000. Photo: Rita Barros

I’ll Be Your Mirror: Allen Midgette

Raymond Foye speaks with the actor who impersonated Andy Warhol during the great Warhol lecture hoax in the late 1960s. The two also discuss Midgette’s earlier film career in Italy and the difficulty of performing in a Warhol film.

The cover of Richard Prince: Cowboy, edited by Robert M. Rubin and published by Fulton Ryder and DelMonico Books | Prestel, New York, in 2020.

Richard Prince: Cowboy

On the occasion of the publication of Richard Prince: Cowboy, a major monograph on the artist’s preoccupation with the mythic American West, Luc Sante tracks the archetype through mass media, advertising, and the art of Richard Prince to illuminate the cowboy’s enduring appeal.

Isabelle Waldberg, with Construction (1943), in her studio, New York, 1943.

Isabelle Waldberg

Jacquelynn Baas profiles Isabelle Waldberg, writing on the sculptor’s many friendships and the influence of her singular creations.

Dorothy Lichtenstein in Roy Lichtenstein’s Southampton studio. Photo by Kasia Wandycz/Paris Match via Getty Images

In Conversation
Dorothy Lichtenstein

Dorothy Lichtenstein sits down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the changes underway at the Lichtenstein Foundation, life in the 1960s, and what brought her to—and kept her in—the Hamptons.