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What’s Modern?

November 6–December 18, 2004
980 Madison Avenue, New York

Richard Artschwager, Geo. W. Bush, 2002 Acrylic, fiber panel on celotex in artist's frame, 26 × 20 inches (66 × 50.8 cm)

Richard Artschwager, Geo. W. Bush, 2002

Acrylic, fiber panel on celotex in artist's frame, 26 × 20 inches (66 × 50.8 cm)

Francis Bacon, Study of Gerard Schürmann, 1969 Oil on canvas, 13 ⅝ × 11 ⅝ inches (34.6 × 29.5 cm)

Francis Bacon, Study of Gerard Schürmann, 1969

Oil on canvas, 13 ⅝ × 11 ⅝ inches (34.6 × 29.5 cm)

John Baldessari, A 1968 Painting, 1968 Acrylic and photo-emulsion on canvas, 59 × 45 inches (149.9 × 114.3 cm)

John Baldessari, A 1968 Painting, 1968

Acrylic and photo-emulsion on canvas, 59 × 45 inches (149.9 × 114.3 cm)

Alexander Calder, Fish, 1952 Hanging mobile of painted steel rod, wire, string, colored glass and metal objects, 15 ½ × 45 ½ inches (39.4 × 115.6 cm)

Alexander Calder, Fish, 1952

Hanging mobile of painted steel rod, wire, string, colored glass and metal objects, 15 ½ × 45 ½ inches (39.4 × 115.6 cm)

Paul Cézanne, Femme Assise, 1893–94 Oil on canvas, 22 × 18 inches (55 × 46 cm)

Paul Cézanne, Femme Assise, 1893–94

Oil on canvas, 22 × 18 inches (55 × 46 cm)

Willem de Kooning, Seated Woman on a Bench, 1972 Bronze, 37 ¾ × 36 × 34 ⅜ inches (95.9 × 91.4 × 87.3 cm), edition of 7

Willem de Kooning, Seated Woman on a Bench, 1972

Bronze, 37 ¾ × 36 × 34 ⅜ inches (95.9 × 91.4 × 87.3 cm), edition of 7

Alberto Giacometti, Man Crossing a Square (Homme traversant une place), 1949 Bronze, 26 ¾ × 31 ½ × 20 ½ inches (67.9 × 80 × 52.1 cm)

Alberto Giacometti, Man Crossing a Square (Homme traversant une place), 1949

Bronze, 26 ¾ × 31 ½ × 20 ½ inches (67.9 × 80 × 52.1 cm)

Damien Hirst, Love Affair, 2001 Household gloss paint and butterflies on canvas, 100 ⅜ × 69 ⅜ inches (254.9 × 176.2 cm)

Damien Hirst, Love Affair, 2001

Household gloss paint and butterflies on canvas, 100 ⅜ × 69 ⅜ inches (254.9 × 176.2 cm)

Jasper Johns, Untitled, 1980 Oil on vellum on canvas, 30 ⅜ × 54 ⅜ inches (77.2 × 138.1 cm)

Jasper Johns, Untitled, 1980

Oil on vellum on canvas, 30 ⅜ × 54 ⅜ inches (77.2 × 138.1 cm)

Jeff Koons, Winter Bears, 1988 Polychromed wood, 48 × 44 × 15 ½ inches (121.9 × 111.8 × 39.4 cm), edition of 3

Jeff Koons, Winter Bears, 1988

Polychromed wood, 48 × 44 × 15 ½ inches (121.9 × 111.8 × 39.4 cm), edition of 3

Roy Lichtenstein, Nude with Abstract Painting, 1994 Oil and Magna on canvas, 60 × 82 inches (152.4 × 208.3 cm)

Roy Lichtenstein, Nude with Abstract Painting, 1994

Oil and Magna on canvas, 60 × 82 inches (152.4 × 208.3 cm)

Pablo Picasso, La Femme Enciente, 1950 Bronze, 41 ¼ × 7 ⅝ × 6 ¼ inches (104.8 × 19.4 × 15.9 cm), edition of 6

Pablo Picasso, La Femme Enciente, 1950

Bronze, 41 ¼ × 7 ⅝ × 6 ¼ inches (104.8 × 19.4 × 15.9 cm), edition of 6

Richard Prince, All I've Heard, 1989 Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 96 × 75 inches (243.8 × 190.5 cm)

Richard Prince, All I've Heard, 1989

Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas, 96 × 75 inches (243.8 × 190.5 cm)

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome), 1961 Oil, crayon and graphite on canvas, 51 ¼ × 59 ¼ inches (130.2 × 150.5 cm)

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome), 1961

Oil, crayon and graphite on canvas, 51 ¼ × 59 ¼ inches (130.2 × 150.5 cm)

Andy Warhol, Mao, 1973 Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 50 × 42 inches (127 × 106.7 cm)

Andy Warhol, Mao, 1973

Synthetic polymer paint and silkscreen ink on canvas, 50 × 42 inches (127 × 106.7 cm)

About

Gagosian is pleased to present the exhibition What’s Modern?, a survey of historic and contemporary works that extensively explores the modernist movement. Scheduled to coincide with the reopening of the Museum of Modern Art’s Manhattan location, this show examines the scope and influence of modernism beginning with the nineteenth century, following its transitions through the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

What’s Modern? highlights the work of thirty major artists, celebrating almost two centuries of art created since the explosion of modernism. From its genesis with Cézanne and Picasso, to the postwar abstraction of de Kooning and Pollock, to the contemporary bearers of modernism’s long-lasting influence, this exhibition seeks to investigate the extent to which the notion of modernism has persisted in the history of art. What’s Modern? traces the timeline of modernism and will explore the means by which artists since the nineteenth century have challenged convention and become “modern” through abstraction, expression, and appropriation.

Artists included in this exhibition: Richard Artschwager, Francis Bacon, John Baldessari, Constantin Brancusi, Alexander Calder, Maurizio Cattelan, Paul Cézanne, Salvador Dalí, Willem de Kooning, Marcel Duchamp, Alberto Giacometti, Damien Hirst, Neil Jenney, Jasper Johns, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Jackson Pollock, Richard Prince, Robert Rauschenberg, Gerhard Richter, Mark Rothko, Ed Ruscha, David Salle, Julian Schnabel, Georges Seurat, Frank Stella, Cy Twombly, Andy Warhol

A fully illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition.

The cover of the Fall 2019 Gagosian Quarterly magazine. Artwork by Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2019

The Fall 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Sinking (2019) by Nathaniel Mary Quinn on its cover.

Left: Sally Mann, Self-Portrait, 1974; right: Jenny Saville in her studio, c. 1990s.

Sally Mann and Jenny Saville

The two artists discuss being drawn to difficult subjects, the effects of motherhood on their practice, embracing chance, and their shared adoration of Cy Twombly.

Francis Bacon: Couplings video still.

Francis Bacon: Couplings

Richard Calvocoressi provides an in-depth view of the exhibition Francis Bacon: Couplings at Gagosian, London, examining a theme that preoccupied the artist throughout his career: the relationship between two people, both physical and psychological.

Glenstone Museum.

Intimate Grandeur: Glenstone Museum

Paul Goldberger tracks the evolution of Mitchell and Emily Rales’s Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. Set amid 230 acres of pristine landscape and housing a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art, this graceful complex of pavilions, designed by architects Thomas Phifer and Partners, opened to the public in the fall of 2018.

The artist Ed Ruscha discussing his work.

Ed Ruscha: A Long Way from Oklahoma

In conjunction with his exhibition VERY at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Humlebæk, Denmark, Ed Ruscha sat down with Kasper Bech Dyg to discuss his work.

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (Notre-Dame), 2019.

For Notre-Dame

An exhibition at Gagosian, Paris, is raising funds to aid in the reconstruction of the Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris following the devastating fire of April 2019. Gagosian directors Serena Cattaneo Adorno and Jean-Olivier Després spoke to Jennifer Knox White about the generous response of artists and others, and what the restoration of this iconic structure means across the world.