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Edmund de Waal

Atemwende

September 12–October 19, 2013
980 Madison Avenue, New York

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Installation video

Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view, photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Installation view Photo by Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Edmund de Waal, Atemwende, 2013 302 porcelain vessels, aluminium and plexiglass cabinet, 87 ⅜ × 118 ⅛ × 5 ⅛ inches (222 × 300 × 13 cm)© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, Atemwende, 2013

302 porcelain vessels, aluminium and plexiglass cabinet, 87 ⅜ × 118 ⅛ × 5 ⅛ inches (222 × 300 × 13 cm)
© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, Atemwende, 2013 (detail) 302 porcelain vessels, aluminium and plexiglass cabinet, 87 ⅜ × 118 ⅛ × 5 ⅛ inches (222 × 300 × 13 cm)© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, Atemwende, 2013 (detail)

302 porcelain vessels, aluminium and plexiglass cabinet, 87 ⅜ × 118 ⅛ × 5 ⅛ inches (222 × 300 × 13 cm)
© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, breathturn, I, 2013 476 porcelain vessels, aluminium and plexiglass cabinet, 90 ⅜ × 118 ⅛ × 3 15/16 inches (229.6 × 300 × 10 cm)© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, breathturn, I, 2013

476 porcelain vessels, aluminium and plexiglass cabinet, 90 ⅜ × 118 ⅛ × 3 15/16 inches (229.6 × 300 × 10 cm)
© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, your hand full of hours, 2013 23 porcelain vessels, in wood, aluminum, and plexiglass vitrine, 17 ¾ × 75 × 10 ¼ inches (45 × 190 × 25.5 cm)© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, your hand full of hours, 2013

23 porcelain vessels, in wood, aluminum, and plexiglass vitrine, 17 ¾ × 75 × 10 ¼ inches (45 × 190 × 25.5 cm)
© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, the white road, I–III, 2013 19 porcelain vessels, in wood and plexiglass cabinet, Each: 22 ¼ × 22 ¼ × 11 inches (56 × 56 × 27.5 cm)© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, the white road, I–III, 2013

19 porcelain vessels, in wood and plexiglass cabinet, Each: 22 ¼ × 22 ¼ × 11 inches (56 × 56 × 27.5 cm)
© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

About

I've been thinking about new ways to make pauses, spaces and silences, where breath is held inside and between each vessel, between the objects and the vitrines, the vitrines and the room. In working with the vessel, working with porcelain, and with colors that express the great history of Oriental ceramics, but also the colors of modernism and minimalism; this seems to be enough material to be getting on with.
—Edmund de Waal

Gagosian Gallery is pleased to announce new work by Edmund de Waal. This is his first exhibition with the gallery.

Atemwende comprises a series of vitrines containing thrown porcelain vessels arranged in specific groupings. From simple pairs of pots to complex multitudes in their hundreds, these minimalist dichotomies in black and white suggest the sequences and patterns of a musical score, while titles cite the poetry of Paul Celan, Wallace Stevens and others.

De Waal's art speaks to his enduring fascination with the nature of objects and the attendant history of their collection and display. His poignant memoir The Hare with Amber Eyes (2010) is a family biography whose recurring motif through five generations is a large collection of netsuke. A potter since childhood and an acclaimed writer, de Waal’s studies of the history of ceramics have taken him from ancient Japan to late modernism. Confronting European and Asian traditions of intimate craftsmanship with the scale and sequence of minimalist art and music, his new ensembles evoke at once the delicate measure of Agnes Martin's sublime abstract paintings, and the rhythmic pulses of the music of Philip Glass and Steve Reich.

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