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Urs Fischer

last supper

April 3–May 8, 2014
Park & 75, New York

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Installation video

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Installation view

Artwork © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Works Exhibited

Urs Fischer, last supper, 2014 Cast bronze, 60 × 60 × 300 inches (152.4 × 152.4 × 762 cm), edition of 2© Urs Fischer. Photo: Melissa Christy

Urs Fischer, last supper, 2014

Cast bronze, 60 × 60 × 300 inches (152.4 × 152.4 × 762 cm), edition of 2
© Urs Fischer. Photo: Melissa Christy

Urs Fischer, last supper, 2014 (detail) Cast bronze, 60 × 60 × 300 inches (152.4 × 152.4 × 762 cm), edition of 2© Urs Fischer. Photo: Melissa Christy

Urs Fischer, last supper, 2014 (detail)

Cast bronze, 60 × 60 × 300 inches (152.4 × 152.4 × 762 cm), edition of 2
© Urs Fischer. Photo: Melissa Christy

About

Gagosian New York is pleased to present a new exhibition in two parts by Urs Fischer, opening on April 3, 2014.

The exhibition is directly related to the vast and extraordinary installation YES, which Fischer and fifteen hundred participants made on-site at the Geffen Contemporary in 2013 together with 1,500 participants, parallel to his survey exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles. Working quickly with clay, in a manner more like a sketch—abstract, approximate, and raw—they were able to achieve an unprecedented directness. But where YES dealt with the ephemeral energies of a collective creative act, Fischer’s new exhibition eternalizes key elements of the original installation as cast unpatinated bronze and gilded bronze figurative sculptures.

The exhibition is in two parts, uptown and downtown. The uptown exhibition inaugurates the opening of a new Gagosian space, Park & 75, at 821 Park Avenue at 75th Street, a storefront gallery of approximately a thousand square feet in a landmarked building. The gallery contains a single large-scale sculpture, last supper, Fischer’s take on the classical religious theme, cast in bronze from the original unfired clay composition that first appeared as a central element of YES.

Simultaneously, an exhibition of other sculptures that Fischer has selected and cast from YES will open in a temporary location downtown operated by Gagosian in a former Chase bank branch at 104 Delancey Street on the Lower East Side. The bland features of the bank’s architecture and decor have been retained, from the corporate signage to the vaults—an incongruous setting for Fischer’s guilelessly expressionistic and exuberant sculptures. From the vast array of forms and figures that YES generated, Fischer has, for the most part, selected some that he initiated then left open to his collaborators to finish as they wished, adding to the alterity and diversity of the final results. The cast bronze sculptures, some of which are silver- and gold-plated, are a heterogenous bunch that includes a one-legged boy in an armchair, a big foot, a fireplace, some columns, a bust of Napoleon, a Louis XIV chair, a mermaid (conceived as a functional fountain), a depiction of sleep, a man copulating with a pig, a man and woman embracing, a hat on rocks, a man in a boat, a faceless cat, a pile, a Pièta, a lion in chains, and so on. Like dreams, these works have no logical relation other than Fischer’s affection for them, a “chaotic little non-family of things,” brought together in an unexpected and therefore “convulsive” context.

Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Winter 2022

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2022

The Winter 2022 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on its cover.

Urs Fischer: Denominator

Urs Fischer: Denominator

Urs Fischer sits down with his friend the author and artist Eric Sanders to address the perfect viewer, the effects of marketing, and the limits of human understanding.

Urs Fischer and Francesco Bonami speaking amidst the installation of "Urs Fischer: Lovers" at Museo Jumex, Mexico City

Urs Fischer: Lovers

The exhibition Urs Fischer: Lovers at Museo Jumex, Mexico City, brings together works from international public and private collections as well as from the artist’s own archive, alongside new pieces made especially for the exhibition. To mark this momentous twenty-year survey, the artist sits down with the exhibition’s curator, Francesco Bonami, to discuss the installation.

Awol Erizku, Lion (Body) I, 2022, Duratrans on lightbox, 49 ⅜ × 65 ⅝ × 3 ¾ inches (125.4 × 166.7 × 9.5 cm) © Awol Erizku

Awol Erizku and Urs Fischer: To Make That Next Move

On the eve of Awol Erizku’s exhibition in New York, he and Urs Fischer discuss what it means to be an image maker, the beauty of blurring genres, the fetishization of authorship, and their shared love for Los Angeles.

Installation view of Urs Fischer’s Untitled (2011) in Ouverture, Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection, Paris, 2021. Artwork © Urs Fischer, courtesy Galerie Eva Presenhuber, Zurich; Bourse de Commerce – Pinault Collection © Tadao Ando Architect & Associates, Niney et Marca Architectes, Agence Pierre-Antoine Gatier. Photo: Stefan Altenburger

Bourse de Commerce

William Middleton traces the development of the new institution, examining the collaboration between the collector François Pinault and the architect Tadao Ando in revitalizing the historic space. Middleton also speaks with artists Tatiana Trouvé and Albert Oehlen about Pinault’s passion as a collector, and with the Bouroullec brothers, who created design features for the interiors and exteriors of the museum.

Augurs of Spring

Augurs of Spring

As spring approaches in the Northern Hemisphere, Sydney Stutterheim reflects on the iconography and symbolism of the season in art both past and present.

News

Photo: Chad Moore

Artist Spotlight

Urs Fischer

June 24–30, 2020

Urs Fischer mines the potential of materials—from clay, steel, and paint to bread, dirt, and produce—to create works that disorient and bewilder. Through scale distortions, illusion, and the juxtaposition of common objects, his paintings, sculptures, photographs, and large-scale installations explore themes of perception and representation while maintaining a witty irreverence and mordant humor.

Photo: Chad Moore