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Extended through January 30, 2021

Edmund de Waal

some winter pots

December 3, 2020–January 30, 2021
Davies Street, London

Installation view Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view

Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view

Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view

Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view

Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view

Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Installation view

Artwork © Edmund de Waal. Photo: Prudence Cummings Associates

Works Exhibited

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (B10), 2020 Porcelain and lead, 2 ⅝ × 6 ½ × 6 ½ inches (6.5 × 16.5 × 16.5 cm)© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (B10), 2020

Porcelain and lead, 2 ⅝ × 6 ½ × 6 ½ inches (6.5 × 16.5 × 16.5 cm)
© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (A3), 2020 Porcelain, lead, and gold, 11 × 6 ⅝ × 6 ⅝ inches (28 × 16.7 × 16.7 cm)© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (A3), 2020

Porcelain, lead, and gold, 11 × 6 ⅝ × 6 ⅝ inches (28 × 16.7 × 16.7 cm)
© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (A4), 2020 Porcelain, lead, and gold, 10 ½ × 6 ⅞ × 6 ⅞ inches (26.5 × 17.5 × 17.5 cm)© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (A4), 2020

Porcelain, lead, and gold, 10 ½ × 6 ⅞ × 6 ⅞ inches (26.5 × 17.5 × 17.5 cm)
© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (A6), 2020 Porcelain, lead, gold, and yellow ochre pigment, 10 ¼ × 6 ⅜ × 6 ⅜ inches (26 × 16 × 16 cm)© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (A6), 2020

Porcelain, lead, gold, and yellow ochre pigment, 10 ¼ × 6 ⅜ × 6 ⅜ inches (26 × 16 × 16 cm)
© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (C4), 2020 Porcelain and gold kintsugi, 3 ¾ × 13 ¼ × 13 ¼ inches (9.4 × 33.5 × 33.5 cm)© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (C4), 2020

Porcelain and gold kintsugi, 3 ¾ × 13 ¼ × 13 ¼ inches (9.4 × 33.5 × 33.5 cm)
© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (C6), 2020 Porcelain, lead, gold, and red pigment, 3 ¾ × 17 × 17 inches (9.5 × 43 × 43 cm)© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (C6), 2020

Porcelain, lead, gold, and red pigment, 3 ¾ × 17 × 17 inches (9.5 × 43 × 43 cm)
© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (C19), 2020 (detail) Porcelain, lead, gold, and red pigment, 5 ½ × 7 ⅛ × 7 ⅛ inches (13.9 × 18 × 18 cm)© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

Edmund de Waal, winter pot (C19), 2020 (detail)

Porcelain, lead, gold, and red pigment, 5 ½ × 7 ⅛ × 7 ⅛ inches (13.9 × 18 × 18 cm)
© Edmund de Waal. Photo: Alzbeta Jaresova

About

Gagosian is pleased to present an exhibition of new works by artist and author Edmund de Waal, made during lockdown earlier this year.

This is the first time in sixteen years that de Waal has made single works that are not parts of installations. They are specifically designed to be touched and held in the hand.

De Waal comments, “I made these pots in lockdown during the spring and early summer. I was alone in my studio and silent and I needed to make vessels to touch and hold, to pass on. I needed to return to what I know—the bowl, the open dish, the lidded jar. When you pick them up you will find the places where I have marked and moved the soft clay. Some of these pots are broken and patched on their rims with folded lead and gold; others are mended with gold lacquer. Some hold shards of porcelain.

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Press

Bolton & Quinn
+44 20 7221 5000

Erica Bolton
erica@boltonquinn.com

Daisy Taylor
daisy@boltonquinn.com

Gagosian
+44 20 7495 1500
presslondon@gagosian.com

Edmund de Waal and Theaster Gates

Artist to Artist: Edmund de Waal and Theaster Gates

Join the artists for an extended conversation about their most recent exhibitions, their forebears in the world of ceramics, and the key role that history plays in their practices.

Installation view, Edmund de Waal: some winter pots, Gagosian, Davies Street

Edmund de Waal: some winter pots

Join the artist in his ceramics studio as he describes the impetus behind his exhibition in London and the importance of touch in the creation of these new works.

Edmund de Waal, stone for two hands and water, 2021, Hornton stone, bamboo, and water, 27 ⅜ × 56 ¾ × 23 ⅝ inches (69.5 × 144 × 60 cm), installation view, Henry Moore Studios & Gardens, Perry Green, England

The Thinking Hand

Edmund de Waal speaks with Richard Calvocoressi about touch in relation to art and our understanding of the world, and discusses the new stone sculptures he created for the exhibition This Living Hand: Edmund de Waal Presents Henry Moore, at the Henry Moore Studios & Gardens. Their conversation took place at the Fitzwilliam Museum, University of Cambridge, in the context of the exhibition The Human Touch.

Edmund de Waal working in his studio.

Edmund de Waal: cold mountain clay

At his studio in London, Edmund de Waal speaks about his new body of work, created in the silence and solitude of lockdown. Composed of layers of porcelain slip inscribed with lines of verse by the poet Hanshan, these works are presented in cold mountain clay, de Waal’s first exhibition in Hong Kong.

Edmund de Waal, London, 2019

Edmund de Waal: psalm

Edmund de Waal speaks with Alison McDonald about the components of psalm, his two-part project in Venice. He details the influences behind the exhibition and reveals some of his hopes for the project.

Rainer Maria Rilke, 1928. Photo: Lou Andreas-Salomé

Rainer Maria Rilke: Duino Elegies

Bobbie Sheng explores the symbiotic relationship between the poet and visual artists of his time and tracks the enduring influence of his poetry on artists working today.

News

Photo: Tom Jamieson

Artist Spotlight

Edmund de Waal

October 27–November 2, 2021

In his visual art and literary works, Edmund de Waal uses objects as vehicles for human narrative, emotion, and history. His installations of handmade porcelain vessels, often contained in minimalist structures, investigate themes of diaspora, memory, and materiality. Much of his practice is concerned with collecting and collections—how objects are brought together and dispersed—and with the application of craft and placement to the physical and conceptual transformation of interior space. Manifest across his work is a distinct aesthetic philosophy that puts the hand, touch, and thus the human above all else.

Photo: Tom Jamieson