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Pop Art Is...

September 27–November 21, 2007
Britannia Street, London

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Works Exhibited

Dan Colen, Untitled (Me & You), 2007 Oil on canvas, 72 × 72 inches (182.9 × 182.9 cm)

Dan Colen, Untitled (Me & You), 2007

Oil on canvas, 72 × 72 inches (182.9 × 182.9 cm)

Tom Friedman, Lollipop Man, 2007 Wood, sculpey and glue, 80 × 24 × 24 inches (203.2 × 61 × 61 cm)

Tom Friedman, Lollipop Man, 2007

Wood, sculpey and glue, 80 × 24 × 24 inches (203.2 × 61 × 61 cm)

Douglas Gordon, Self-Portrait of You + Me (Mick Jagger), 2007 Smoke, wax and mirror, 40 5/16 × 36 5/16 inches (102.4 × 92.3 cm)

Douglas Gordon, Self-Portrait of You + Me (Mick Jagger), 2007

Smoke, wax and mirror, 40 5/16 × 36 5/16 inches (102.4 × 92.3 cm)

Richard Hamilton, Epiphany, 1964 Cellulose on panel, diameter: 48 inches (121.9 cm)© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London

Richard Hamilton, Epiphany, 1964

Cellulose on panel, diameter: 48 inches (121.9 cm)
© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London

Damien Hirst, Problem Girl, 2001 Glass, stainless steel, plasterzote and medical packaging, 70 13/16 × 35 ⅜ × 14 3/16 inches (179.8 × 89.9 × 36 cm)

Damien Hirst, Problem Girl, 2001

Glass, stainless steel, plasterzote and medical packaging, 70 13/16 × 35 ⅜ × 14 3/16 inches (179.8 × 89.9 × 36 cm)

Dennis Hopper, Andy Warhol (at table), 1963 Gelatin silver print, 24 × 16 inches (61 × 40.6 cm)

Dennis Hopper, Andy Warhol (at table), 1963

Gelatin silver print, 24 × 16 inches (61 × 40.6 cm)

Jasper Johns, Target, 1961 Encaustic and collage on canvas, 66 × 66 inches (167.6 × 167.6 cm)

Jasper Johns, Target, 1961

Encaustic and collage on canvas, 66 × 66 inches (167.6 × 167.6 cm)

Mike Kelley, Memory Ware Flat # 27, 2001 Paper pulp, tile grout, acrylic, beads, buttons and jewellery on wooden panel, 70 ¼ × 46 ½ × 4 inches (178.4 × 118.1 × 10.2 cm)

Mike Kelley, Memory Ware Flat # 27, 2001

Paper pulp, tile grout, acrylic, beads, buttons and jewellery on wooden panel, 70 ¼ × 46 ½ × 4 inches (178.4 × 118.1 × 10.2 cm)

Jeff Koons, Popeye, 2003 Oil on canvas, 108 × 84 inches (274.3 × 213.4cm)

Jeff Koons, Popeye, 2003

Oil on canvas, 108 × 84 inches (274.3 × 213.4cm)

Yayoi Kusama, DOTS-OBSESSION(GBB), 2004 Acrylic and enamel on canvas, 63 13/16 × 63 13/16 inches (162 × 162 cm)

Yayoi Kusama, DOTS-OBSESSION(GBB), 2004

Acrylic and enamel on canvas, 63 13/16 × 63 13/16 inches (162 × 162 cm)

Roy Lichtenstein, Art, 1962 Oil and magna on canvas, 36 × 68 inches (91.4 × 172.7 cm)

Roy Lichtenstein, Art, 1962

Oil and magna on canvas, 36 × 68 inches (91.4 × 172.7 cm)

Takashi Murakami, Chit Chat, 2007 Acrylic and platinum leaf on canvas mounted on board, 3 panels: 23 ⅝ inches diameter each (60 cm)© 2007 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved

Takashi Murakami, Chit Chat, 2007

Acrylic and platinum leaf on canvas mounted on board, 3 panels: 23 ⅝ inches diameter each (60 cm)
© 2007 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All Rights Reserved

Tim Noble & Sue Webster, Walk On Water, 1998 Stainless and enamelled steel, neon, electronic light sequencer (3-channel caterpillar effect), transformers, 81 ⅞ × 24 inches (208 × 61 cm)

Tim Noble & Sue Webster, Walk On Water, 1998

Stainless and enamelled steel, neon, electronic light sequencer (3-channel caterpillar effect), transformers, 81 ⅞ × 24 inches (208 × 61 cm)

Claes Oldenburg, Cash Register, 1961 Muslin soaked in plaster over wire frame in enamel, 25 × 21 × 34 inches (63.5 × 53.3 × 86.4 cm)

Claes Oldenburg, Cash Register, 1961

Muslin soaked in plaster over wire frame in enamel, 25 × 21 × 34 inches (63.5 × 53.3 × 86.4 cm)

Steven Parrino, 3 Units Aluminum Death Shifter, 1992 Enamel on canvas, 3 elements: 108 ¾ × 106 ¼ × 14 inches overall (276.24 × 270 × 35.56 cm)

Steven Parrino, 3 Units Aluminum Death Shifter, 1992

Enamel on canvas, 3 elements: 108 ¾ × 106 ¼ × 14 inches overall (276.24 × 270 × 35.56 cm)

Richard Prince, Untitled (Portrait), 2007 Mixed media on canvas, 80 × 120 inches (203.2 × 304.8cm)

Richard Prince, Untitled (Portrait), 2007

Mixed media on canvas, 80 × 120 inches (203.2 × 304.8cm)

Gerhard Richter, Personegruppe (Group of People), 1965 Oil on canvas, 66 ⅞ × 78 11/16 inches (170 × 200 cm)

Gerhard Richter, Personegruppe (Group of People), 1965

Oil on canvas, 66 ⅞ × 78 11/16 inches (170 × 200 cm)

Ed Ruscha, Bundle of Pencils, Breaking Glass, 1969 Oil on canvas, 60 × 55 inches (152.4 × 139.7cm)

Ed Ruscha, Bundle of Pencils, Breaking Glass, 1969

Oil on canvas, 60 × 55 inches (152.4 × 139.7cm)

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome), 1970 Oil based house paint and wax crayon on canvas, 61 ¼ × 75 inches (155.6 × 190.5 cm)

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Rome), 1970

Oil based house paint and wax crayon on canvas, 61 ¼ × 75 inches (155.6 × 190.5 cm)

Piotr Uklański, Untitled (T-Shirt), 2002 One United States dollar bill, 2 3/16 × 2 3/16 inches (5.5 × 5.5 cm)

Piotr Uklański, Untitled (T-Shirt), 2002

One United States dollar bill, 2 3/16 × 2 3/16 inches (5.5 × 5.5 cm)

Andy Warhol, Hamburger, 1965–86 Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 50 × 60 inches (127 × 152.4 cm)

Andy Warhol, Hamburger, 1965–86

Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 50 × 60 inches (127 × 152.4 cm)

Franz West, Paßstück, 1982 Metal, wood, paint and gauze, 19 ⅞ × 23 ⅝ × 10 inches (50.5 × 60 × 25.5 cm)

Franz West, Paßstück, 1982

Metal, wood, paint and gauze, 19 ⅞ × 23 ⅝ × 10 inches (50.5 × 60 × 25.5 cm)

Christopher Wool, Untitled, 2005 Silkscreen ink on linen, 104 × 78 inches (264.2 × 198.9 cm)

Christopher Wool, Untitled, 2005

Silkscreen ink on linen, 104 × 78 inches (264.2 × 198.9 cm)

Aaron Young, Weekend Prince (Passion Punch), 2007 Silkscreen ink on colored mirror, 72 × 100 inches (182.9 × 254 cm)

Aaron Young, Weekend Prince (Passion Punch), 2007

Silkscreen ink on colored mirror, 72 × 100 inches (182.9 × 254 cm)

About

Pop Art is: Popular (designed for a mass audience), Transient (short term solution), Expendable (easily-forgotten), Low cost, Mass produced, Young, Witty, Sexy, Gimmicky, Glamorous, Big Business. . .

This is just the beginning. . .
—Richard Hamilton, 1957

Gagosian is pleased to present a major exhibition to mark the fiftieth anniversary of Richard Hamilton’s visionary definition of Pop art. Hamilton’s seminal role in this movement has been widely acknowledged, and this exhibition includes artists of his generation as well as many others who have contributed to the development and dissemination of Pop over the last fifty years.

Pop art crossed all boundaries between high and low culture to produce many of the twentieth century’s iconic images. Artists around the world radically transformed painting and sculpture, according the same importance to the everyday and the mass-produced that had previously been the reserve of the epic and the unique. Andy Warhol’s vision of the role of art in modern society and the democratization of art production were set in motion as artists took images from advertising, Hollywood, comic books, and industrially designed products to address issues such as class, political change, and consumer culture. Whether they borrowed in a celebratory or critical spirit, Pop artists encouraged a new contemporary sensibility through their fresh perception of visual, cultural, and commercial icons. Pop represented a sudden and dramatic expansion of often-contradictory possibilities, which has been one of the main reasons for its continued influence on subsequent generations of artists.

This exhibition allows us to consider the ways in which artists, past and present, respond to constantly changing ideas about what Pop art is. It presents the rise of Pop art, and its establishment as a major force in contemporary art, through works by more than forty artists, from the first generation of Pop artists—including Hamilton, Jasper Johns, Yayoi Kusama, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, Ed Ruscha, and Warhol—to subsequent generations of artists who have traced and extended Pop art’s varied legacies, including Rachel Harrison, Damien Hirst, Mike Kelley, Jeff Koons, Nate Lowman, Takashi Murakami, Richard Prince, and others. In this highly engaging artistic dialogue, methods of seriality and repetition, the use of synthetic materials as well as media images, and references to mass production are visible proof that the concept of Pop is still vital in contemporary art.

Read more

Jordan Wolfson’s House with Face (2017) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Fall 2022

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2022

The Fall 2022 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Jordan Wolfson’s House with Face (2017) on its cover.

Black and white image of the interior of Cy Twombly’s apartment in Rome

Cy Twombly: Making Past Present

In 2020, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, announced their plan for a survey of Cy Twombly’s artwork alongside selections from their permanent ancient Greek and Roman collection. The survey was postponed due to the lockdowns necessitated by the coronavirus pandemic, but was revived in 2022 with a presentation at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles from August 2 through October 30. In 2023, the exhibition will arrive at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The curator for the exhibition, Christine Kondoleon, and Kate Nesin, author of Cy Twombly’s Things (2014) and advisor for the show, speak with Gagosian director Mark Francis about the origin of the exhibition and the aesthetic and poetic resonances that give the show its title: Making Past Present.

A Takashi Murakami painting of a female avatar with blue and pink hair: CLONE X #59 Harajuku-style Angel

Takashi Murakami and RTFKT: An Arrow through History

Bridging the digital and the physical realms, the three-part presentation of paintings and sculptures that make up Takashi Murakami: An Arrow through History at Gagosian, New York, builds on the ongoing collaboration between the artist and RTFKT Studios. Here, Murakami and the RTFKT team explain the collaborative process, the necessity of cognitive revolution, the metaverse, and the future of art to the Quarterly’s Wyatt Allgeier.

Takashi Murakami cover and Andreas Gursky cover for Gagosian Quarterly, Summer 2022 magazine

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2022

The Summer 2022 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, with two different covers—featuring Takashi Murakami’s 108 Bonnō MURAKAMI.FLOWERS (2022) and Andreas Gursky’s V & R II (2022).

Richard Prince, Untitled (Original Cowboy), 2013, chromogenic print, in frame, 70 ⅛ × 100 ⅛ × 2 inches (178.1 × 254.3 × 5.1 cm) © Richard Prince, courtesy Richard Prince Studio

Picture Books: Percival Everett and Brandon Taylor

The second installment of Picture Books, an imprint organized by Emma Cline and Gagosian, presents author Percival Everett’s novella Grand Canyon, Inc. alongside Untitled (Original Cowboy), a photograph by Richard Prince. In celebration of the publication, Everett met with author Brandon Taylor to discuss the novella, the role of history in the writing process, and the similarity in methodologies for science and literature.

Cy Twombly, Untitled (Say Goodbye, Catallus, to the Shores of Asia Minor), 1994, oil, acrylic, oil stick, crayon, and graphite on three canvases,

Say Goodbye, Catullus, to the Shores of Asia Minor

Thierry Greub tracks the literary references in Cy Twomblys epic painting of 1994.