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Cy Twombly

Eight Sculptures

September 15–October 31, 2009
980 Madison Avenue, New York

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation

Installation video Play Button

Installation video

Works Exhibited

Cy Twombly, Untitled (The Mathematical Dream of Ashurbanipal), 2000–09 Bronze, 41 ⅛ × 20 ⅞ × 21 ⅜ inches (104.5 × 53.1 × 54.2 cm), cast 3/3© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled (The Mathematical Dream of Ashurbanipal), 2000–09

Bronze, 41 ⅛ × 20 ⅞ × 21 ⅜ inches (104.5 × 53.1 × 54.2 cm), cast 3/3
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004–09 Bronze, 49 ¼ × 12 ¼ × 11 ⅝ inches (125 × 31.1 × 29.6 cm), cast 3/3© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004–09

Bronze, 49 ¼ × 12 ¼ × 11 ⅝ inches (125 × 31.1 × 29.6 cm), cast 3/3
© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2009 Bronze, 24 ⅛ × 16 ½ × 14 ¼ inches (61.3 × 42 × 36.3 cm), cast 1/3© Cy Twombly Foundation

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2009

Bronze, 24 ⅛ × 16 ½ × 14 ¼ inches (61.3 × 42 × 36.3 cm), cast 1/3
© Cy Twombly Foundation

About

Bronze unifies the thing. It abstracts the forms from the material. People want to know about what the material constituents are; it helps them identify the work with something. But I want each sculpture to be seen as a whole, as a sculpture.
—Cy Twombly

Gagosian is pleased to present an exhibition of new bronze sculptures by Cy Twombly, coinciding with the inauguration of Gagosian’s Athens gallery with Leaving Paphos Ringed with Waves, an exhibition of the artist’s new paintings. Two major museum exhibitions—Cy Twombly: The Natural World, Selected Works 2000–2007, which inaugurated the new wing of the Art Institute of Chicago, and Cy Twombly: Sensations of the Moment at Museum Moderner Kunst Stiftung Ludwig Wien, Vienna—are on view through October 2009.

Since 1946 Twombly has fashioned sculptures from everyday materials and objects, usually painted with white gesso. In 1979 he began casting some of them in bronze, thus unifying, preserving, and transforming them into cohesive wholes independent from the original bricolages. The surfaces and patinas of these cast bronzes evoke weathered artifacts that have been exhumed from the earth, an effect that is heightened in those that have been coated in white oil paint.

Some of these sculptures contain allusions to the static, closed forms of Egyptian and Mesopotamian sculpture, as well as to other architectural and geometric references such as the repetition of rectangular pedestals and circular structures. Others refer to historical representations, such as Untitled (The Mathematical Dream of Ashurbanipal) (2000–09), which alludes to the scholarly Assyrian king whose military prowess was the subject of a rival king’s dream in which his eventual submission to Assyria was predicted. While the components of these sculptures have been partially merged and abstracted by the casting process, in works such as Untitled (2004–09) a progression of precariously balanced objects—in this case, a broom inside a funnel that rests on a cylindrical pedestal—is clearly demarcated. Twombly’s continued play between fragility and obduracy, figuration and abstraction, ancient and modern imbues each work with its characteristic tension.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with an essay by Kate Nesin.

Featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2020

The Summer 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

River Café menu with illustration by Ed Ruscha.

The River Café Cookbook

London’s River Café, a culinary mecca perched on a bend in the River Thames, celebrated its thirtieth anniversary in 2018. To celebrate this milestone and the publication of her cookbook River Café London, cofounder Ruth Rogers sat down with Derek Blasberg to discuss the famed restaurant’s allure.

Left: Sally Mann, Self-Portrait, 1974; right: Jenny Saville in her studio, c. 1990s.

In Conversation
Sally Mann and Jenny Saville

The two artists discuss being drawn to difficult subjects, the effects of motherhood on their practice, embracing chance, and their shared adoration of Cy Twombly.

The cover of the Fall 2019 Gagosian Quarterly magazine. Artwork by Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2019

The Fall 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Sinking (2019) by Nathaniel Mary Quinn on its cover.

Glenstone Museum.

Intimate Grandeur: Glenstone Museum

Paul Goldberger tracks the evolution of Mitchell and Emily Rales’s Glenstone Museum in Potomac, Maryland. Set amid 230 acres of pristine landscape and housing a world-class collection of modern and contemporary art, this graceful complex of pavilions, designed by architects Thomas Phifer and Partners, opened to the public in the fall of 2018.

Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished

Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished

Mark Francis, director of the exhibition Cy Twombly: In Beauty it is finished, Drawings 1951–2008, describes the impetus for this expansive presentation, the source for its title, and details the stories of some of the works on view.