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Cleijne + Gallagher, Curry, Höller, Huyghe, Kusama, Warhol, Wright

July 27–September 2, 2011
Beverly Hills

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view, photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view, photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view, photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view, photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation video Play Button

Installation video

Works Exhibited

Aaron Curry, Snowblind, 2011 Silkscreen on wood with aluminum base, 120 ½ × 92 ¾ × 45 inches overall (306.1 × 235.6 × 114.3 cm)Photo by Ben Lee Handler

Aaron Curry, Snowblind, 2011

Silkscreen on wood with aluminum base, 120 ½ × 92 ¾ × 45 inches overall (306.1 × 235.6 × 114.3 cm)
Photo by Ben Lee Handler

Aaron Curry, Mouth Mind, 2011 Collage, 14 × 16 × 8 ½ inches (35.6 × 40.6 × 21.6 cm)

Aaron Curry, Mouth Mind, 2011

Collage, 14 × 16 × 8 ½ inches (35.6 × 40.6 × 21.6 cm)

Carsten Höller, Wonderful, 2008 (view with lights on) Aluminum channel letters, bulbs, and DMX controller, 10 ¾ × 98 ½ × 4 inches (27.3 × 250.2 × 10.2 cm)© Carsten Höller

Carsten Höller, Wonderful, 2008 (view with lights on)

Aluminum channel letters, bulbs, and DMX controller, 10 ¾ × 98 ½ × 4 inches (27.3 × 250.2 × 10.2 cm)
© Carsten Höller

Carsten Höller, Wonderful, 2008 (view with lights off) Aluminum channel letters, bulbs, and DMX controller, 10 ¾ × 98 ½ × 4 inches (27.3 × 250.2 × 10.2 cm)© Carsten Höller

Carsten Höller, Wonderful, 2008 (view with lights off)

Aluminum channel letters, bulbs, and DMX controller, 10 ¾ × 98 ½ × 4 inches (27.3 × 250.2 × 10.2 cm)
© Carsten Höller

Pierre Huyghe, Les grandes ensembles, 2001 (film still) VistaVision film transferred to Digital Betacam, ink on transparency, and light box; video: color, sound, 7:51 minutes© Pierre Huyghe

Pierre Huyghe, Les grandes ensembles, 2001 (film still)

VistaVision film transferred to Digital Betacam, ink on transparency, and light box; video: color, sound, 7:51 minutes
© Pierre Huyghe

Yayoi Kusama, Reach Up to the Universe, Dotted Pumpkin, 2010 Aluminum, paint, 78 ¾ × 59 × 59 inches (200 × 150 × 150 cm)Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Yayoi Kusama, Reach Up to the Universe, Dotted Pumpkin, 2010

Aluminum, paint, 78 ¾ × 59 × 59 inches (200 × 150 × 150 cm)
Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

About

Gagosian Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition featuring the work of Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher, Aaron Curry, Carsten Höller, Pierre Huyghe, Yayoi Kusama, Andy Warhol, and Richard Wright.

Using the strategies of accumulation, saturation, and the repetitive mark, these artists explore their fascination with image-saturated space and “alloverness,” from the delicate controlled lines of Richard Wright’s untitled drawing (2005) to the jostling interaction of Andy Warhol’s Silver Clouds (1994); from Carsten Höller’s Wonderful (2008), which charges its surroundings and assaults the senses with nerve-shattering flashing lights to Pierre Huyghe’s more meditative video installation Les Grands Ensembles (The Housing Project, 2001), in which the exterior view of an apartment pulses with light, building to a patterned visual crescendo that envelops the screen.

Works by Edgar Cleijne and Ellen Gallagher, Yayoi Kusama, and Aaron Curry are immersive environments, Chinese-box style: Cleijne/Gallagher’s latest installation Osedax (2011)—referring to a type of deep-sea bone-eating worm—is a free-standing room containing a continuous projection of 16mm film footage alongside slide projections of fragmented accumulations. A set of intricate photogravures with the same title feature hand-stamping as well as cut-and-collaged bas relief on Japanese paper. Kusama’s Reach Up to the Universe, Dotted Pumpkin (2011) conflates two of her favorite motifs, the mirror and the pumpkin, which she has described as a sort of alter-ego. A hollow form cast in aluminum, highly polished, and perforated with holes to reveal a violet interior, Reach Up… is installed in a matched monochrome environment dotted with convex mirrors of varying sizes, so that sculpture and environment endlessly reflect and multiply each other and the viewers moving between them. In Aaron Curry’s untitled installation, free-standing figures made of silkscreened plywood advance and recede against whimsical graphic backgrounds.

Alexander Calder poster for McGovern, 1972, lithograph

The Art History of Presidential Campaign Posters

Against the backdrop of the 2020 US presidential election, historian Hal Wert takes us through the artistic and political evolution of American campaign posters, from their origin in 1844 to the present. In an interview with Quarterly editor Gillian Jakab, Wert highlights an array of landmark posters and the artists who made them.

Allen Midgette in front of the Chelsea Hotel, New York, 2000. Photo: Rita Barros

I’ll Be Your Mirror: Allen Midgette

Raymond Foye speaks with the actor who impersonated Andy Warhol during the great Warhol lecture hoax in the late 1960s. The two also discuss Midgette’s earlier film career in Italy and the difficulty of performing in a Warhol film.

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait with Skull, 1977, Polaroid Polacolor Type 108, 4 ¼ × 3 ⅜ inches (10.8 × 8.6 cm). The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; Founding Collection, Contribution The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Andy Warhol: From the Polaroid and Back Again

Jessica Beck, the Milton Fine Curator of Art at the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, considers the artist’s career-spanning use of Polaroid photography as part of his more expansive practice.

Andy Warhol catalogue. Philadelphia: Institute of Contemporary Art, 1965.

Book Corner
On Collecting with Norman Diekman

Rare-book expert Douglas Flamm speaks with designer Norman Diekman about his unique collection of books on art and architecture. Diekman describes his first plunge into book collecting, the history behind it, and the way his passion for collecting grew.

Andy Warhol cover design for the magazine Aspen 1, no. 3.

Artists’ Magazines

Gwen Allen recounts her discovery of cutting-edge artists’ magazines from the 1960s and 1970s and explores the roots and implications of these singular publications.

Richard Wright, no title, 2019 (detail), silver leaf on ceiling and walls at Gagosian, Park & 75, New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Behind the Art
Richard Wright

In an interview with Kay Pallister, the artist explains his relationship to drawing and the importance of time in his site-specific works.