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Carsten Höller

Carsten Höller Revolving Doors, 2016 Mirrored revolving glass doors, aluminum, alucobond, and steel 219 3/4 × 219 3/4 × 89 3/4 inches (558 × 558 × 228 cm) Artwork © Carsten Höller, photo by Attilio Maranzano, courtesy Hayward, HangarBicocca

Carsten Höller Revolving Doors, 2016

Mirrored revolving glass doors, aluminum, alucobond, and steel 219 3/4 × 219 3/4 × 89 3/4 inches (558 × 558 × 228 cm) Artwork © Carsten Höller, photo by Attilio Maranzano, courtesy Hayward, HangarBicocca

Carsten Höller, Dice (White Body, Black Dots), 2014 Glass reinforced polyester resin / fiberglass, and poplar plywood on expanded poly-styrene core and mechanical connectors, 94 ½ × 94 ½ × 94 ½ inches (240 × 240 × 240 cm)

Carsten Höller, Dice (White Body, Black Dots), 2014

Glass reinforced polyester resin / fiberglass, and poplar plywood on expanded poly-styrene core and mechanical connectors, 94 ½ × 94 ½ × 94 ½ inches (240 × 240 × 240 cm)

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Carsten Höller, 5 Giant Mushroom, 2009 Styrofoam, polyester paint, polyester resin, acrylic paint, core wire, surfacer, polyurethane foam, hard foam construction panels, steel, 5 parts: dimensions variable. Installation at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The NetherlandsPhoto by Attilio Maranzano / Courtesy the artist and Esther Schipper, Berlin

Carsten Höller, 5 Giant Mushroom, 2009

Styrofoam, polyester paint, polyester resin, acrylic paint, core wire, surfacer, polyurethane foam, hard foam construction panels, steel, 5 parts: dimensions variable. Installation at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Photo by Attilio Maranzano / Courtesy the artist and Esther Schipper, Berlin

Carsten Höller, Singing Canaries Mobile, 2009 Powdercoated steel construction, wood, PVC, Dimensions variable

Carsten Höller, Singing Canaries Mobile, 2009

Powdercoated steel construction, wood, PVC, Dimensions variable

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Reindeers & Spheres, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, California, 2009 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Reindeers & Spheres, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, California, 2009

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Joshua White

Carsten Höller, Wonderful, 2008 Aluminum channel letters, bulbs, DMX controller, 10 11/16 × 98 ½ × 4 inches (27.3 × 250.2 × 10.2 cm)Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Carsten Höller, Wonderful, 2008

Aluminum channel letters, bulbs, DMX controller, 10 11/16 × 98 ½ × 4 inches (27.3 × 250.2 × 10.2 cm)
Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

CARSTEN HÖLLER Light Room, 2008 Double LED lamps, aluminum sheeting, cables, controller system Dimensons variable Installation at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, photo by Markus Tretter / Courtesy the artist/VBK, Vienna

CARSTEN HÖLLER Light Room, 2008

Double LED lamps, aluminum sheeting, cables, controller system Dimensons variable Installation at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, photo by Markus Tretter / Courtesy the artist/VBK, Vienna

CARSTEN HÖLLER R B Ride, 2007 Carousel Dimensons variable Installation at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, photo by Markus Tretter / Courtesy the artist/VBK, Vienna

CARSTEN HÖLLER R B Ride, 2007

Carousel Dimensons variable Installation at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, photo by Markus Tretter / Courtesy the artist/VBK, Vienna

Carsten Höller, Lignano Ski Lab, 2007 Chromogenic print on aluminum, 58 11/16 × 46 5/16 inches (149 × 117.5 cm), edition 2/3

Carsten Höller, Lignano Ski Lab, 2007

Chromogenic print on aluminum, 58 11/16 × 46 5/16 inches (149 × 117.5 cm), edition 2/3

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Test Site, Tate Modern, London, 2006–07 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: © Tate Photography

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Test Site, Tate Modern, London, 2006–07

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: © Tate Photography

CARSTEN HÖLLER Carousel Mirror, 2006 Mirrors mounted on MDF panels, lightbulbs, stainless steel seats, stainless steel chains, steel construction, electric motor, cables 295 1/4 × 185 × 185 inches (750 × 470 × 470 cm) Installation at Sudeley Castle, Winchcombe, UK

CARSTEN HÖLLER Carousel Mirror, 2006

Mirrors mounted on MDF panels, lightbulbs, stainless steel seats, stainless steel chains, steel construction, electric motor, cables 295 1/4 × 185 × 185 inches (750 × 470 × 470 cm) Installation at Sudeley Castle, Winchcombe, UK

CARSTEN HÖLLER Carousel Mirror, 2005 Mirrors mounted on MDF panels, lightbulbs, stainless steel seats, stainless steel chains, steel construction, electric motor, cables 295 1/4 × 185 × 185 inches (750 × 470 × 470 cm). Installation at Gagosian Gallery Britannia Street, London.

CARSTEN HÖLLER Carousel Mirror, 2005

Mirrors mounted on MDF panels, lightbulbs, stainless steel seats, stainless steel chains, steel construction, electric motor, cables 295 1/4 × 185 × 185 inches (750 × 470 × 470 cm). Installation at Gagosian Gallery Britannia Street, London.

Carsten Höller, Flugmaschine (Flying Machine), 1996 Steel, electric motor, cable connections, paragliding harnews, grip, wood, Scanachrome on PVC, Approx. 196 ⅞ × 236 3/16 × 236 3/16 inches (500 × 600 × 600 cm)

Carsten Höller, Flugmaschine (Flying Machine), 1996

Steel, electric motor, cable connections, paragliding harnews, grip, wood, Scanachrome on PVC, Approx. 196 ⅞ × 236 3/16 × 236 3/16 inches (500 × 600 × 600 cm)

About

Carsten Höller applies his training as a scientist to his work as an artist, concentrating particularly on the nature of human relationships. Major installations include Flying Machine (1996), an interactive work in which viewers are strapped into a harness and hoisted through the air; Test Site (2006), a series of giant slides installed in Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall; Amusement Park (2006), a large installation at MASS MoCA of full-sized carnival midway rides operating at dramatically slowed speeds; The Double Club (2008–09), a work designed to create a dialogue between Congolese and Western culture in the form of a London bar, restaurant, and nightclub; and Upside-Down Goggles (2009–11), an ongoing participatory experiment with vision distortion through goggles. Höller’s Revolving Hotel Room, an installation that became a fully operational hotel room by night, was featured in the exhibition theanyspacewhatever at the Guggenheim Museum, New York (2008–09).

Höller was born in 1961 in Brussels to German parents. Major exhibitions and solo presentations include the 50th Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2003); One Day One Day, Färgfabriken, Stockholm (2003); 7th Biennale de Lyon, France (2003); Half Fiction, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2003); 7,8 Hz, Le Consortium, Dijon, France (2004); Une exposition à Marseille, Musée d’Art Contemporain, Marseille (2004); 51st Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2005); Test Site, Tate Modern, London (2006); Amusement Park, MASS MoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts (2006); Carrousel, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria (2008); The Double Club, Fondazione Prada, London (2008); 28th Bienal de São Paulo (2008); Double Slide, Museum of Contemporary Art, Zagreb (2009); 53rd Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2009); 8th Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2010); Divided Divided, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Netherlands (2010); Soma, Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2010); Double Carousel with Zöllner Stripes, Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Rome (2011); Experience, New Museum, New York (2011); 11th Sharjah Biennial, United Arab Emirates (2013); LEBEN, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna (2014); 8th Berlin Biennale (2014); 10th Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2014); Golden Mirror Carousel, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2014–15); 56th Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2015); Decision, Hayward Gallery, London (2015); Doubt, Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, Italy (2016); Video Retrospective with Two Light Machines, Mu.ZEE, Ostend, Belgium (2016); Y, Centro Botín, Santander, Spain (2017); and Sunday, Museo Tamayo, Mexico City (2019). The Slide at the ArcelorMittal Orbit (2016), Höller’s commissioned addition to Anish Kapoor’s ArcelorMittal Orbit (2012), is permanently installed at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London; and his site-specific Aventura Slide Tower (2018) can be experienced at the Aventura Mall, Florida

Höller lives and works in Stockholm and Biriwa, Ghana.

Carsten Höller

Photo: John Scarisbrick

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Carsten Höller, Seven Sliding Doors Corridor (Outdoor Version), 2021, installation view, Luma Arles, France © Carsten Höller. Photo: Adrian Deweerdt

Permanent Installation

Carsten Höller
Seven Sliding Doors Corridor (Outdoor Version)

Carsten Höller’s installation Seven Sliding Doors Corridor (Outdoor Version), recently installed at Luma Arles, France, consists of electronic sliding doors with mirrored surfaces on both sides, through which a viewer can walk in an apparently endless passage. The doors are installed inside a corridor that traverses a pond in a garden. Motion sensors cause them to slide open when someone approaches and close when the person moves away. As a result, the movements of viewers alternately break and bind the visual limits of the space, which can be entered from either end of the corridor, increasing the likelihood of unexpected encounters.

Carsten Höller, Seven Sliding Doors Corridor (Outdoor Version), 2021, installation view, Luma Arles, France © Carsten Höller. Photo: Adrian Deweerdt

Carsten Höller, Isometric Slides, 2021 (detail), installation view, The Tower, Luma Arles, France © Carsten Höller. Photo: Mark Domage

Permanent Installation

Carsten Höller
Isometric Slides

Carsten Höller has developed a site-specific slide for the Tower at Luma Arles, France, designed by Frank Gehry. According to Höller, “a slide is a sculpture that you can travel inside” and experience a unique emotional state situated between pleasure and madness. However, the artist emphasizes that it is not necessary to use the slide to make sense of it—observing other visitors travel between levels of the building is an equally stimulating experience.

Carsten Höller, Isometric Slides, 2021 (detail), installation view, The Tower, Luma Arles, France © Carsten Höller. Photo: Mark Domage

Carsten Höller, DAC Slide, 2020 (detail), installation view, Danish Architecture Center, Copenhagen © Carsten Höller. Photo: courtesy the artist and Ny Carlsbergfondet

Permanent Installation

Carsten Höller
DAC Slide

Carsten Höller has developed a site-specific 40-meter slide for the Danish Architecture Center, Copenhagen. The spiral slide takes visitors from the Exhibition Forum four stories down to the ground floor. Of these playful structures Höller says, “Why are slides not used in architecture, to complement stairs, elevators, and escalators?” DAC Slide was donated by the Ny Carlsbergfondet.

Carsten Höller, DAC Slide, 2020 (detail), installation view, Danish Architecture Center, Copenhagen © Carsten Höller. Photo: courtesy the artist and Ny Carlsbergfondet

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Museum Exhibitions

Carsten Höller, Divisions (Turquoise Lines and Pink Circles), 2014 © Carsten Höller

On View

Carsten Höller
Day

Through February 28, 2022
Museu de Arte, Arquitetura e Tecnologia, Lisbon
www.maat.pt

Carsten Höller: Day brings together an array of works producing light and darkness, including sculptures that function as lamps, projections, and architectural interventions, dating from 1987, when Höller was working as a scientist, to today. More than twenty works, many re-created especially for this show, unfold across the museum in an arrangement that creates a dialogue with the museum’s architecture. The exhibition space is illuminated exclusively by Höller’s art, leading audiences through multi-sensorial experiences of altered perception.

Carsten Höller, Divisions (Turquoise Lines and Pink Circles), 2014 © Carsten Höller

Installation view, Dyr i kunsten, Arken Museum, Ishoj, Denmark, May 26, 2020–January 10, 2021. Artwork © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020. Photo: David Stjernholm

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Dyr i kunsten

March 21, 2020–January 10, 2021
Arken Museum, Ishoj, Denmark
uk.arken.dk

Dyr i kunsten, or Animals in Art, features sculpture, installations, video, photography, and paintings by a wide array of international artists whose work explores the ways that humans study, categorize, live with, and use animals and how we thus attempt to gain a deeper understanding of ourselves. Work by Douglas Gordon, Damien Hirst, and Carsten Höller is included.

Installation view, Dyr i kunsten, Arken Museum, Ishoj, Denmark, May 26, 2020–January 10, 2021. Artwork © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020. Photo: David Stjernholm

Carsten Höller, Gartenkinder, 2014 © Carsten Höller. Photo: Mike Bruce

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Carsten Höller
Reproduction

September 28, 2019–April 13, 2020
Copenhagen Contemporary
copenhagencontemporary.org

In this exhibition Carsten Höller examines the theme of reproduction, adopting an approach that is at once scientific and artistic. The museum is transformed into a large, biology-based playscape where, for example, the visitors are encouraged to crawl through the pips of a die, and where slow-moving merry-go-rounds and corridors of mirrors affect their sensory perceptions.

Carsten Höller, Gartenkinder, 2014 © Carsten Höller. Photo: Mike Bruce

Carsten Höller, Upside-Down Goggles, 1994– © Carsten Höller. Photo: Elzbieta Bialkowska

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Carsten Höller
Behaviour

September 26, 2019–February 23, 2020
Kunsten Museum of Modern Art Aalborg, Denmark
kunsten.dk

Carsten Höller’s work aims to involve its viewers both physically and mentally, often arriving at an intersection between play, science, and art. In Behaviour, visitors experience contact with artwork that enables disruption or transformation of the way they view their surroundings via light, sound, smell, mirror images, and other means.

Carsten Höller, Upside-Down Goggles, 1994– © Carsten Höller. Photo: Elzbieta Bialkowska

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Press

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