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Carsten Höller

Carsten Höller Revolving Doors, 2016 Mirrored revolving glass doors, aluminum, alucobond, and steel 219 3/4 × 219 3/4 × 89 3/4 inches (558 × 558 × 228 cm) Artwork © Carsten Höller, photo by Attilio Maranzano, courtesy Hayward, HangarBicocca

Carsten Höller Revolving Doors, 2016

Mirrored revolving glass doors, aluminum, alucobond, and steel 219 3/4 × 219 3/4 × 89 3/4 inches (558 × 558 × 228 cm) Artwork © Carsten Höller, photo by Attilio Maranzano, courtesy Hayward, HangarBicocca

Carsten Höller, Dice (White Body, Black Dots), 2014 Glass reinforced polyester resin / fiberglass, and poplar plywood on expanded poly-styrene core and mechanical connectors, 94 ½ × 94 ½ × 94 ½ inches (240 × 240 × 240 cm)

Carsten Höller, Dice (White Body, Black Dots), 2014

Glass reinforced polyester resin / fiberglass, and poplar plywood on expanded poly-styrene core and mechanical connectors, 94 ½ × 94 ½ × 94 ½ inches (240 × 240 × 240 cm)

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Experience, New Museum, New York, 2011–12

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Benoit Pailley

Carsten Höller, 5 Giant Mushroom, 2009 Styrofoam, polyester paint, polyester resin, acrylic paint, core wire, surfacer, polyurethane foam, hard foam construction panels, steel, 5 parts: dimensions variable. Installation at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The NetherlandsPhoto by Attilio Maranzano / Courtesy the artist and Esther Schipper, Berlin

Carsten Höller, 5 Giant Mushroom, 2009

Styrofoam, polyester paint, polyester resin, acrylic paint, core wire, surfacer, polyurethane foam, hard foam construction panels, steel, 5 parts: dimensions variable. Installation at Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Photo by Attilio Maranzano / Courtesy the artist and Esther Schipper, Berlin

Carsten Höller, Singing Canaries Mobile, 2009 Powdercoated steel construction, wood, PVC, Dimensions variable

Carsten Höller, Singing Canaries Mobile, 2009

Powdercoated steel construction, wood, PVC, Dimensions variable

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Reindeers & Spheres, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, California, 2009 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Joshua White

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Reindeers & Spheres, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, California, 2009

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: Joshua White

Carsten Höller, Wonderful, 2008 Aluminum channel letters, bulbs, DMX controller, 10 11/16 × 98 ½ × 4 inches (27.3 × 250.2 × 10.2 cm)Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

Carsten Höller, Wonderful, 2008

Aluminum channel letters, bulbs, DMX controller, 10 11/16 × 98 ½ × 4 inches (27.3 × 250.2 × 10.2 cm)
Photo by Douglas M. Parker Studio

CARSTEN HÖLLER Light Room, 2008 Double LED lamps, aluminum sheeting, cables, controller system Dimensons variable Installation at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, photo by Markus Tretter / Courtesy the artist/VBK, Vienna

CARSTEN HÖLLER Light Room, 2008

Double LED lamps, aluminum sheeting, cables, controller system Dimensons variable Installation at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, photo by Markus Tretter / Courtesy the artist/VBK, Vienna

CARSTEN HÖLLER R B Ride, 2007 Carousel Dimensons variable Installation at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, photo by Markus Tretter / Courtesy the artist/VBK, Vienna

CARSTEN HÖLLER R B Ride, 2007

Carousel Dimensons variable Installation at Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria, photo by Markus Tretter / Courtesy the artist/VBK, Vienna

Carsten Höller, Lignano Ski Lab, 2007 Chromogenic print on aluminum, 58 11/16 × 46 5/16 inches (149 × 117.5 cm), edition 2/3

Carsten Höller, Lignano Ski Lab, 2007

Chromogenic print on aluminum, 58 11/16 × 46 5/16 inches (149 × 117.5 cm), edition 2/3

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Test Site, Tate Modern, London, 2006–07 Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: © Tate Photography

Installation view, Carsten Höller: Test Site, Tate Modern, London, 2006–07

Artwork © Carsten Höller. Photo: © Tate Photography

CARSTEN HÖLLER Carousel Mirror, 2006 Mirrors mounted on MDF panels, lightbulbs, stainless steel seats, stainless steel chains, steel construction, electric motor, cables 295 1/4 × 185 × 185 inches (750 × 470 × 470 cm) Installation at Sudeley Castle, Winchcombe, UK

CARSTEN HÖLLER Carousel Mirror, 2006

Mirrors mounted on MDF panels, lightbulbs, stainless steel seats, stainless steel chains, steel construction, electric motor, cables 295 1/4 × 185 × 185 inches (750 × 470 × 470 cm) Installation at Sudeley Castle, Winchcombe, UK

CARSTEN HÖLLER Carousel Mirror, 2005 Mirrors mounted on MDF panels, lightbulbs, stainless steel seats, stainless steel chains, steel construction, electric motor, cables 295 1/4 × 185 × 185 inches (750 × 470 × 470 cm). Installation at Gagosian Gallery Britannia Street, London.

CARSTEN HÖLLER Carousel Mirror, 2005

Mirrors mounted on MDF panels, lightbulbs, stainless steel seats, stainless steel chains, steel construction, electric motor, cables 295 1/4 × 185 × 185 inches (750 × 470 × 470 cm). Installation at Gagosian Gallery Britannia Street, London.

Carsten Höller, Flugmaschine (Flying Machine), 1996 Steel, electric motor, cable connections, paragliding harnews, grip, wood, Scanachrome on PVC, Approx. 196 ⅞ × 236 3/16 × 236 3/16 inches (500 × 600 × 600 cm)

Carsten Höller, Flugmaschine (Flying Machine), 1996

Steel, electric motor, cable connections, paragliding harnews, grip, wood, Scanachrome on PVC, Approx. 196 ⅞ × 236 3/16 × 236 3/16 inches (500 × 600 × 600 cm)

About

Carsten Höller applies his training as a scientist to his work as an artist, concentrating particularly on the nature of human relationships. Major installations include Flying Machine (1996), an interactive work in which viewers are strapped into a harness and hoisted through the air; Test Site (2006), a series of giant slides installed in Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall; Amusement Park (2006), a large installation at MASS MoCA of full-sized carnival midway rides operating at dramatically slowed speeds; The Double Club (2008–09), a work designed to create a dialogue between Congolese and Western culture in the form of a London bar, restaurant, and nightclub; and Upside-Down Goggles (2009–11), an ongoing participatory experiment with vision distortion through goggles. Höller’s Revolving Hotel Room, an installation that became a fully operational hotel room by night, was featured in the exhibition theanyspacewhatever at the Guggenheim Museum, New York (2008–09).

Höller was born in 1961 in Brussels to German parents. Major exhibitions and solo presentations include the 50th Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2003); One Day One Day, Färgfabriken, Stockholm (2003); 7th Biennale de Lyon, France (2003); Half Fiction, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2003); 7,8 Hz, Le Consortium, Dijon, France (2004); Une exposition à Marseille, Musée d’Art Contemporain, Marseille (2004); 51st Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2005); Test Site, Tate Modern, London (2006); Amusement Park, MASS MoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts (2006); Carrousel, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Austria (2008); The Double Club, Fondazione Prada, London (2008); 28th Bienal de São Paulo (2008); Double Slide, Museum of Contemporary Art, Zagreb (2009); 53rd Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2009); 8th Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2010); Divided Divided, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam, Netherlands (2010); Soma, Hamburger Bahnhof, Berlin (2010); Double Carousel with Zöllner Stripes, Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, Rome (2011); Experience, New Museum, New York (2011); 11th Sharjah Biennial, United Arab Emirates (2013); LEBEN, Thyssen-Bornemisza Art Contemporary, Vienna (2014); 8th Berlin Biennale (2014); 10th Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2014); Golden Mirror Carousel, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia (2014–15); 56th Biennale di Venezia, Venice (2015); Decision, Hayward Gallery, London (2015); Doubt, Pirelli HangarBicocca, Milan, Italy (2016); Video Retrospective with Two Light Machines, Mu.ZEE, Ostend, Belgium (2016); Y, Centro Botín, Santander, Spain (2017); and Sunday, Museo Tamayo, Mexico City (2019). The Slide at the ArcelorMittal Orbit (2016), Höller’s commissioned addition to Anish Kapoor’s ArcelorMittal Orbit (2012), is permanently installed at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, London; and his site-specific Aventura Slide Tower (2018) can be experienced at the Aventura Mall, Florida

Höller lives and works in Stockholm and Biriwa, Ghana.

Carsten Höller

Photo: James Veysey/Camera Press/Redux

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Adam McEwen, Escape from New York, 2014 (still from “Battery Tunnel”) © Adam McEwen

Online Exhibition

Broadcast
Alternate Meanings in Film and Video

You’re only as young as the last time you changed your mind.
—Timothy Leary

Gagosian is pleased to present Broadcast: Alternate Meanings in Film and Video, an online exhibition of artists’ films and videos viewable exclusively on gagosian.com. The exhibition will be organized into a series of “chapters,” each lasting two weeks. The first chapter begins on Tuesday, May 19, 2020.

Broadcast: Alternate Meanings in Film and Video employs the innate immediacy of time-based art to spark reflection on the here and now, taking the words of famed psychologist and countercultural icon Timothy Leary as its starting point. 

Adam McEwen, Escape from New York, 2014 (still from “Battery Tunnel”) © Adam McEwen

Carsten Höller, Fara Fara, 2014 (still) © Carsten Höller

Screening

Carsten Höller
Fara Fara

Monday, December 30, 2019
Palm Beach, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo

Realized together with the Swedish film director Måns Månsson, Carsten Höller’s film Fara Fara (2014) documents the music scene in Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of Congo. In Congolese tradition, the fara fara, which means “face-to-face” in Lingala, is a musical competition in which two musicians perform concurrently on different stages, playing for as long as they possibly can. The musician who is able to engage their audience the longest wins. The film examines the individual psychology of the people who spearhead Kinshasa’s music scene, offering insightful observations on the context, history, and political impact of this specific subculture.

Carsten Höller, Fara Fara, 2014 (still) © Carsten Höller

The Extreme Present

Exhibition

The Extreme Present

Opening reception: Tuesday, December 3, 5–8pm
December 4–8, 2019
Moore Building, Miami

Gagosian is pleased to announce The Extreme Present, the fifth in a series of annual exhibitions at the Moore Building in the Miami Design District during Art Basel Miami Beach, presented by Gagosian and Jeffrey Deitch. The Extreme Present will explore artists’ reactions to the conditions of our accelerating and increasingly complex world. The title is inspired by The Age of Earthquakes: A Guide to the Extreme Present, a book by Shumon Basar, Douglas Coupland, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, published in 2015. Their provocative thesis addresses the rapidly evolving digital era, half a century after Marshall McLuhan’s groundbreaking study on technology’s influence on culture, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man, in which he coined the phrase “the medium is the message.” Works in this exhibition explore concepts of media, communication, togetherness, and isolation.

Download the full press release (PDF)

The Extreme Present

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Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Dyr i kunsten, Arken Museum, Ishoj, Denmark, May 26, 2020–January 10, 2021. Artwork © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020. Photo: David Stjernholm

On View

Dyr i kunsten

Through January 10, 2021
Arken Museum, Ishoj, Denmark
uk.arken.dk

Dyr i kunsten, or Animals in Art, features sculpture, installations, video, photography, and paintings by a wide array of international artists whose work explores the ways that humans study, categorize, live with, and use animals and how we thus attempt to gain a deeper understanding of ourselves. Work by Douglas Gordon, Damien Hirst, and Carsten Höller is included.

Installation view, Dyr i kunsten, Arken Museum, Ishoj, Denmark, May 26, 2020–January 10, 2021. Artwork © Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, DACS 2020. Photo: David Stjernholm

Carsten Höller, Gartenkinder, 2014 © Carsten Höller. Photo: Mike Bruce

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Carsten Höller
Reproduction

September 28, 2019–April 13, 2020
Copenhagen Contemporary
copenhagencontemporary.org

In this exhibition Carsten Höller examines the theme of reproduction, adopting an approach that is at once scientific and artistic. The museum is transformed into a large, biology-based playscape where, for example, the visitors are encouraged to crawl through the pips of a die, and where slow-moving merry-go-rounds and corridors of mirrors affect their sensory perceptions.

Carsten Höller, Gartenkinder, 2014 © Carsten Höller. Photo: Mike Bruce

Carsten Höller, Upside-Down Goggles, 1994– © Carsten Höller. Photo: Elzbieta Bialkowska

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Carsten Höller
Behaviour

September 26, 2019–February 23, 2020
Kunsten Museum of Modern Art Aalborg, Denmark
kunsten.dk

Carsten Höller’s work aims to involve its viewers both physically and mentally, often arriving at an intersection between play, science, and art. In Behaviour, visitors experience contact with artwork that enables disruption or transformation of the way they view their surroundings via light, sound, smell, mirror images, and other means.

Carsten Höller, Upside-Down Goggles, 1994– © Carsten Höller. Photo: Elzbieta Bialkowska

Carsten Höller, Dice (Limestone), 2019 (in progress) © Carsten Höller. Photo: Ricardo Gonçalves

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Carsten Höller in
Expanded

May 10–November 24, 2019
Fondazione Giorgio Cini, Venice
www.primeirapedra.com

Expanded features three newly commissioned works in stone by Marina Abramović, Carsten Höller, and Julião Sarmento. Höller presents a large-scale die made of Portuguese limestone based on his 2014 sculpture Dice (White Body, Black Dots). The exhibition is part of Primeira Pedra (First Stone), an experimental international research program that explores the potential of Portuguese stone. The project is managed by experimentadesign and cofunded by the EU.

Carsten Höller, Dice (Limestone), 2019 (in progress) © Carsten Höller. Photo: Ricardo Gonçalves

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Press

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