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Extended through July 2, 2015

Cy Twombly

April 23–July 2, 2015
980 Madison Avenue, New York

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Collection Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Collection Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Collection Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork © Cy Twombly Foundation. Collection Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004–09 Bronze, 49 ⅛ × 12 ⅛ × 11 ⅝ inches (125 × 31.1 × 29.6 cm)Collection Cy Twombly Foundation© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004–09

Bronze, 49 ⅛ × 12 ⅛ × 11 ⅝ inches (125 × 31.1 × 29.6 cm)
Collection Cy Twombly Foundation
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Cy Twombly, Blooming, 2001–08 Acrylic and wax crayon on panel, in 10 parts, 98 ⅜ × 196 ⅞ inches (250 × 500 cm)Private Collection© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Cy Twombly, Blooming, 2001–08

Acrylic and wax crayon on panel, in 10 parts, 98 ⅜ × 196 ⅞ inches (250 × 500 cm)
Private Collection
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Mike Bruce

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004 Plaster, wood, acrylic, nails, and iron, 33 ⅞ × 8 ¼ × 9 inches (86 × 21 × 22.9 cm)Collection Cy Twombly Foundation© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Tom Powel

Cy Twombly, Untitled, 2004

Plaster, wood, acrylic, nails, and iron, 33 ⅞ × 8 ¼ × 9 inches (86 × 21 × 22.9 cm)
Collection Cy Twombly Foundation
© Cy Twombly Foundation. Photo: Tom Powel

About

Each line is now the actual experience with its own innate history. It does not illustrate—it is the sensation of its own realization.
—Cy Twombly

Gagosian New York is pleased to present a group of the last paintings and sculptures of the late Cy Twombly, many of which have never been seen publicly.

Throughout his sixty-year career, Twombly infused the physical and emotional aspects of Abstract Expressionism with a wealth of historic and mythic allusion. He combined elements of gestural abstraction, drawing, and writing in a highly idiosyncratic and potent expression. At once epic and intimate, his work is steeped with references to poetry, classical mythology, and history. The alternation between the visible and the hidden, between present and past, and the struggle between memory and oblivion are unifying themes in his work.

The Bacchus series (2004-08) is charged with visceral energies. In huge arcs and drips of sanguine paint, sensation courses through the annals of myth and history. In later untitled works, cursive white lines against dark blue fields similarly describe the gestural force that first appeared in the “blackboard” paintings of the 1960s and early 1970s. Blooming (2001–08) is an efflorescent ten-panel painting spanning more than sixteen feet in width. Twombly captures and memorializes in patches of lush crayon and paint, and drips and flows of startling color, the fragile, heady nature of the peony flowers so revered in Japanese aesthetic contemplation.

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