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Edmund de Waal

ten thousand things

January 14–February 18, 2016
Beverly Hills

Installation view © Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view

© Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view © Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view

© Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view © Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view

© Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view © Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view

© Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view © Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view

© Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view © Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Installation view

© Edmund de Waal, photo by Jeff McLane

Works Exhibited

Edmund de Waal, the ten thousand things, for John Cage, XX, 2015 3 porcelain vessels and Cor-Ten steel block in aluminum box, 17 11/16 × 17 11/16 × 7 ½ inches (45 × 45 × 19 cm)© Edmund de Waal

Edmund de Waal, the ten thousand things, for John Cage, XX, 2015

3 porcelain vessels and Cor-Ten steel block in aluminum box, 17 11/16 × 17 11/16 × 7 ½ inches (45 × 45 × 19 cm)
© Edmund de Waal

Edmund de Waal, a lecture on the weather, 2015 290 porcelain vessels in wood, aluminum, and glass vitrine, 41 ⅝ × 62 ⅜ × 4 5/16 inches (105.7 × 158.4 × 11 cm)© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, a lecture on the weather, 2015

290 porcelain vessels in wood, aluminum, and glass vitrine, 41 ⅝ × 62 ⅜ × 4 5/16 inches (105.7 × 158.4 × 11 cm)
© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, a lecture on the weather, 2015 (detail) 290 porcelain vessels in wood, aluminum, and glass vitrine, 41 ⅝ × 62 ⅜ × 4 5/16 inches (105.7 × 158.4 × 11 cm)© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, a lecture on the weather, 2015 (detail)

290 porcelain vessels in wood, aluminum, and glass vitrine, 41 ⅝ × 62 ⅜ × 4 5/16 inches (105.7 × 158.4 × 11 cm)
© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, to speak to you, 2015 17 porcelain vessels and 10 Cor-Ten steel blocks in aluminum cabinet, 35 7/16 × 43 5/16 × 7 ⅞ inches (90 × 110 × 20 cm)© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, to speak to you, 2015

17 porcelain vessels and 10 Cor-Ten steel blocks in aluminum cabinet, 35 7/16 × 43 5/16 × 7 ⅞ inches (90 × 110 × 20 cm)
© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, black milk, 2015 237 porcelain vessels in a pair of wood, aluminium, and glass vitrines, Overall: 108 × 100 ⅜ × 5 ½ inches (274.5 × 255 × 13.5 cm)© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

Edmund de Waal, black milk, 2015

237 porcelain vessels in a pair of wood, aluminium, and glass vitrines, Overall: 108 × 100 ⅜ × 5 ½ inches (274.5 × 255 × 13.5 cm)
© Edmund de Waal, photo by Mike Bruce

About

For this new body of work, I have made a series of conversations about materials with architectural space. How people walk through spaces, how they encounter what I make, how it is possible to make work to pause the world a little, is my imperative. At its core is one simple question: it is about what it means to belong in one place at one time.
—Edmund de Waal

Gagosian Beverly Hills is pleased to present new works by Edmund de Waal for his first solo exhibition in Los Angeles.

De Waal's art and literature speak to his enduring fascination with the nature of objects, and the narratives of their collection and display. A potter since childhood and an acclaimed writer, his obsession with porcelain or “white gold” has led to encounters with many people and places that help deepen his understanding of the nature of the material. His latest book, The White Road: Journey into an Obsession (2015), traces the historical evolution of porcelain from its origin in Jingdezhen, China, through developments in Venice, Versailles, Dresden, Cornwall, and the Cherokee Country of South Carolina.

From simple pairs to complex multitudes of small objects, de Waal draws inspiration from many sources, including the poetry of Paul Celan and the musical compositions of John Cage. At the heart of this exhibition is a series of responses to the Schindler House on Kings Road in Los Angeles; a revolutionary building from 1922 by the Viennese émigré architect, Rudolph Schindler. For de Waal, the Schindler House is “improvisatory architecture,” which offered a new way of living and working, a new set of possibilities for materials, a new architecture for a new city. It was here that, according to de Waal, Cage "began to clear his mind."

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