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I Don’t Like Fiction, I Like History

Duane Hanson with Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, Sharon Lockhart, and Jeff Wall

September 5–28, 2018
Beverly Hills

Installation view with Duane Hanson, Lunchbreak (1989) Artwork © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Duane Hanson, Lunchbreak (1989)

Artwork © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Sharon Lockhart. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Sharon Lockhart. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Sharon Lockhart, Maja and Elodie (2003) © Sharon Lockhart. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Sharon Lockhart, Maja and Elodie (2003)

© Sharon Lockhart. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Thomas Demand, Ruine / Ruin (2017) © Thomas Demand. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Thomas Demand, Ruine / Ruin (2017)

© Thomas Demand. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Thomas Demand; © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Thomas Demand; © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Sharon Lockhart, © Thomas Demand. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Sharon Lockhart, © Thomas Demand. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Jeff Wall; © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Sharon Lockhart. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Jeff Wall; © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Sharon Lockhart. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Jeff Wall, Tenants (2007) © Jeff Wall. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Jeff Wall, Tenants (2007)

© Jeff Wall. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Duane Hanson, Child with Puzzle (1978) © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Duane Hanson, Child with Puzzle (1978)

© 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Sharon Lockhart, © Thomas Demand. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Sharon Lockhart, © Thomas Demand. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Andreas Gursky/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2018; © Jeff Wall; © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Andreas Gursky/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2018; © Jeff Wall; © 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Andreas Gursky, Utah (2017) © Andreas Gursky/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2018. Photo: Jeff McLane

Installation view with Andreas Gursky, Utah (2017)

© Andreas Gursky/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2018. Photo: Jeff McLane

Works Exhibited

Duane Hanson, Lunchbreak, 1989 (detail) Polyvinyl polychromed with oil and mixed media with accessories, installation dimensions variable, unique© 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Duane Hanson, Lunchbreak, 1989 (detail)

Polyvinyl polychromed with oil and mixed media with accessories, installation dimensions variable, unique
© 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Duane Hanson, Lunchbreak, 1989 (detail) Polyvinyl polychromed with oil and mixed media with accessories, installation dimensions variable, unique© 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Duane Hanson, Lunchbreak, 1989 (detail)

Polyvinyl polychromed with oil and mixed media with accessories, installation dimensions variable, unique
© 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Duane Hanson, Lunchbreak, 1989 (detail) Polyvinyl polychromed with oil and mixed media with accessories, installation dimensions variable, unique© 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Duane Hanson, Lunchbreak, 1989 (detail)

Polyvinyl polychromed with oil and mixed media with accessories, installation dimensions variable, unique
© 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Duane Hanson, Child with Puzzle, 1978 (detail) Polyvinyl polychromed with oil and mixed media with accessories, installation dimensions variable, unique© 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Duane Hanson, Child with Puzzle, 1978 (detail)

Polyvinyl polychromed with oil and mixed media with accessories, installation dimensions variable, unique
© 2018 Estate of Duane Hanson/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Jeff McLane

Thomas Demand, Parkett / Parquetry, 2014 Chromogenic print mounted on Plexiglas, 39 × 54 inches (99.1 × 137.2 cm), edition of 6© Thomas Demand

Thomas Demand, Parkett / Parquetry, 2014

Chromogenic print mounted on Plexiglas, 39 × 54 inches (99.1 × 137.2 cm), edition of 6
© Thomas Demand

Andreas Gursky, Utah, 2017 Diasec-mounted inkjet print, 88 ⅞ × 180 ¼ inches (225.6 × 457.6 cm), edition of 6 + 2 AP© Andreas Gursky/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2018. Photo: courtesy Sprüth Magers Berlin London

Andreas Gursky, Utah, 2017

Diasec-mounted inkjet print, 88 ⅞ × 180 ¼ inches (225.6 × 457.6 cm), edition of 6 + 2 AP
© Andreas Gursky/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2018. Photo: courtesy Sprüth Magers Berlin London

Sharon Lockhart, Lunch Break installation, “Duane Hanson: Sculptures of Life,” 14 December 2002–23 February 2003, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 2003 (detail) 4 chromogenic prints, each: 72 × 121 inches (182.9 × 307.3 cm), the Broad, Los Angeles© Sharon Lockhart. Photo: courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Sharon Lockhart, Lunch Break installation, “Duane Hanson: Sculptures of Life,” 14 December 2002–23 February 2003, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 2003 (detail)

4 chromogenic prints, each: 72 × 121 inches (182.9 × 307.3 cm), the Broad, Los Angeles
© Sharon Lockhart. Photo: courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Sharon Lockhart, Lunch Break installation, “Duane Hanson: Sculptures of Life,” 14 December 2002–23 February 2003, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 2003 (detail) 4 chromogenic prints, each: 72 × 121 inches (182.9 × 307.3 cm), the Broad, Los Angeles© Sharon Lockhart. Photo: courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Sharon Lockhart, Lunch Break installation, “Duane Hanson: Sculptures of Life,” 14 December 2002–23 February 2003, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 2003 (detail)

4 chromogenic prints, each: 72 × 121 inches (182.9 × 307.3 cm), the Broad, Los Angeles
© Sharon Lockhart. Photo: courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Sharon Lockhart, Lunch Break installation, “Duane Hanson: Sculptures of Life,” 14 December 2002–23 February 2003, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 2003 (detail) 4 chromogenic prints, each: 72 × 121 inches (182.9 × 307.3 cm), the Broad, Los Angeles© Sharon Lockhart. Photo: courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Sharon Lockhart, Lunch Break installation, “Duane Hanson: Sculptures of Life,” 14 December 2002–23 February 2003, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 2003 (detail)

4 chromogenic prints, each: 72 × 121 inches (182.9 × 307.3 cm), the Broad, Los Angeles
© Sharon Lockhart. Photo: courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Sharon Lockhart, Lunch Break installation, “Duane Hanson: Sculptures of Life,” 14 December 2002–23 February 2003, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 2003 (detail) 4 chromogenic prints, each: 72 × 121 inches (182.9 × 307.3 cm), the Broad, Los Angeles© Sharon Lockhart. Photo: courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Sharon Lockhart, Lunch Break installation, “Duane Hanson: Sculptures of Life,” 14 December 2002–23 February 2003, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, 2003 (detail)

4 chromogenic prints, each: 72 × 121 inches (182.9 × 307.3 cm), the Broad, Los Angeles
© Sharon Lockhart. Photo: courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels

Jeff Wall, Tenants, 2007 Gelatin silver print, 100 ⅝ × 132 inches (255.4 × 335.3 cm), edition of 3 + 1 AP© Jeff Wall

Jeff Wall, Tenants, 2007

Gelatin silver print, 100 ⅝ × 132 inches (255.4 × 335.3 cm), edition of 3 + 1 AP
© Jeff Wall

About

Realism is best suited to convey the frightening idiosyncrasies of our time.
—Duane Hanson

A picture is something that makes invisible its before and after.
—Jeff Wall

Gagosian is pleased to present I Don’t Like Fiction, I Like History, with works by Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, Duane Hanson, Sharon Lockhart, and Jeff Wall.

Using the pictorial languages of realism and illusion, the participating artists turn fragments of everyday life into legible narratives. Duane Hanson’s ensemble of construction workers at rest, Lunchbreak (1989), and a figure modeled after his own child in a quiet moment, Child with Puzzle (1978), are installed with photographic works that both reflect and complicate ideas of recorded reality and subjective, constructed composition.

Hanson’s hyperreal human figures, often in mundane situations, have been compared to Pop and to Photorealism; instantly and innately familiar, they come as close to photography as three-dimensional sculpture can. Yet in their verisimilitude, these effigies of house painters, janitors, security workers, and tourists evoke the intuitive pathos of confronting another human being. Working against the dominant trends of abstraction and Minimalism at the beginning of his career in the 1950s and ’60s, Hanson eschewed pure formalism, as the sociological aspect of art making became palpable in his work through his concentration on the bare life of his subjects. Some sculptures, such as that of a museum guard installed within a museum exhibition, deconstruct the “fourth wall” between artworks and viewer, making visceral a normally safe, insulated encounter.

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