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An Ideal Landscape

February 9–March 27, 2021
980 Madison Avenue, New York

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Urs Fischer, © Albert Oehlen. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Urs Fischer, © Albert Oehlen. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Albert Oehlen; © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Albert Oehlen; © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Jennifer Guidi, © Theaster Gates. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Jennifer Guidi, © Theaster Gates. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Neil Jenney. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Theaster Gates, © Neil Jenney. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Neil Jenney, © Jonas Wood. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Neil Jenney, © Jonas Wood. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Jonas Wood, © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Jonas Wood, © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Mary Weatherford, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Mary Weatherford, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view with Adam McEwen, Titanic Iceberg #3 (Blue) (2018) Artwork © Adam McEwen. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view with Adam McEwen, Titanic Iceberg #3 (Blue) (2018)

Artwork © Adam McEwen. Photo: Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Adam McEwen, Titanic Iceberg #3 (Blue), 2018 Inkjet print on cellulose sponge, 24 × 38 inches (61 × 96.5 cm)© Adam McEwen

Adam McEwen, Titanic Iceberg #3 (Blue), 2018

Inkjet print on cellulose sponge, 24 × 38 inches (61 × 96.5 cm)
© Adam McEwen

Neil Jenney, North America Depicted, 2009–10 Oil on wood, in painted wood artist’s frame, 41 × 46 × 3 ½ inches (104.1 × 116.8 × 8.9 cm)© Neil Jenney

Neil Jenney, North America Depicted, 2009–10

Oil on wood, in painted wood artist’s frame, 41 × 46 × 3 ½ inches (104.1 × 116.8 × 8.9 cm)
© Neil Jenney

Jonas Wood, Japanese Garden with Moon and Stars, 2020 Oil and acrylic on canvas, 72 × 70 inches (182.9 × 177.8 cm)© Jonas Wood

Jonas Wood, Japanese Garden with Moon and Stars, 2020

Oil and acrylic on canvas, 72 × 70 inches (182.9 × 177.8 cm)
© Jonas Wood

Mary Weatherford, The Frog, 2020 Flashe and neon on linen, 66 × 58 inches (167.6 × 147.3 cm)© Mary Weatherford

Mary Weatherford, The Frog, 2020

Flashe and neon on linen, 66 × 58 inches (167.6 × 147.3 cm)
© Mary Weatherford

Urs Fischer, Purple Fall, 2020 Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, polyurethane adhesive, epoxy primer, gesso, solvent-based screen-printing paint, and water-based screen-printing paint, 96 × 76 ¾ inches (243.8 × 194.9 cm)© Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer, Purple Fall, 2020

Aluminum composite panel, aluminum honeycomb, polyurethane adhesive, epoxy primer, gesso, solvent-based screen-printing paint, and water-based screen-printing paint, 96 × 76 ¾ inches (243.8 × 194.9 cm)
© Urs Fischer

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 2019 Acrylic on canvas, 84 ¼ × 72 ⅛ inches (214 × 183 cm)© Albert Oehlen

Albert Oehlen, Untitled, 2019

Acrylic on canvas, 84 ¼ × 72 ⅛ inches (214 × 183 cm)
© Albert Oehlen

Helen Frankenthaler, Peacock Alley, 1990 Acrylic on canvas, 70 ½ × 123 inches (179.1 × 312.4 cm)© 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Helen Frankenthaler, Peacock Alley, 1990

Acrylic on canvas, 70 ½ × 123 inches (179.1 × 312.4 cm)
© 2021 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Jennifer Guidi, Light on the Mountain (Painted Green Sand #7A, Light Pink-Pink-Orange-Yellow Sky, Dark Purple-Blue Mountain, Green Ground), 2020 Sand, acrylic, and oil on linen, 21 × 15 inches (53.3 × 38.1 cm)© Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Rob McKeever

Jennifer Guidi, Light on the Mountain (Painted Green Sand #7A, Light Pink-Pink-Orange-Yellow Sky, Dark Purple-Blue Mountain, Green Ground), 2020

Sand, acrylic, and oil on linen, 21 × 15 inches (53.3 × 38.1 cm)
© Jennifer Guidi. Photo: Rob McKeever

Theaster Gates, Red City, 2020 Industrial oil-based enamel, rubber torch down, bitumen, wood, and copper, 72 × 108 inches (182.9 × 274.3 cm)© Theaster Gates

Theaster Gates, Red City, 2020

Industrial oil-based enamel, rubber torch down, bitumen, wood, and copper, 72 × 108 inches (182.9 × 274.3 cm)
© Theaster Gates

Walton Ford, Euphrates, 2020 Watercolor, gouache, and ink on paper, 60 × 120 inches (152.4 × 304.8 cm)© Walton Ford

Walton Ford, Euphrates, 2020

Watercolor, gouache, and ink on paper, 60 × 120 inches (152.4 × 304.8 cm)
© Walton Ford

Georg Baselitz, Non lesso, ma duro, 2020 Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 75 ⅝ inches (300 × 192 cm)© Georg Baselitz 2020

Georg Baselitz, Non lesso, ma duro, 2020

Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 75 ⅝ inches (300 × 192 cm)
© Georg Baselitz 2020

About

Gagosian is pleased to present An Ideal Landscape, a group exhibition exploring contemporary approaches to the depiction of place.

Throughout the history of art, landscape painting has functioned as an important locus of visual symbolism. By situating classical allegories in idyllic pastoral settings, for example, seventeenth-century European artists such as Annibale Carracci and Nicolas Poussin were able to present an idealized view of the world that provided visual theater while also reflecting cultural mores. An Ideal Landscape takes a parallel yet converse approach for our times, presenting the genre as a vehicle for critique of the flawed and fraught social and political landscapes of today’s world.

Some works on view, such as Helen Frankenthaler’s luminous Peacock Alley (1990), conceive landscape as atmospheric abstraction, while others present imagined locations that capture their creators’ longing for alternative yet elusive states of being. Some artists literally incorporate elements of real environments to explore formal concerns relating to composition, medium, and color. Combining both new industrial materials and salvaged fragments from roofs that once sheltered human life, the scarred skyline of Theaster Gates’s suggestively titled Red City (2020) evokes the grit and precarity of urban existence. In the sunset scene of Light on the Mountain (2020), Jennifer Guidi takes a similarly unorthodox material approach; she incorporates sand into her oil paints, allowing her to make dimensional, mandala-like marks across the surface of her canvas in an exploration of the mystical and the meditative. Despite their vastly different methods and philosophies, the artists featured in An Ideal Landscape are united by a shared desire not only to portray the lived world—but also to reshape it.

The exhibition includes works by Georg Baselitz, Urs Fischer, Walton Ford, Helen Frankenthaler, Theaster Gates, Jennifer Guidi, Neil Jenney, Adam McEwen, Albert Oehlen, Ed Ruscha, Mary Weatherford, and Jonas Wood.

Helen Frankenthaler, Madame Butterfly, 102 color woodcut from 46 woodblocks

The Romance of a New Medium: Helen Frankenthaler and the Art of Collaboration

Inspired by the recent retrospective of Helen Frankenthaler’s woodcuts at the Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, William Davie writes about the artist’s innovative journey with printmaking. Davie illuminates Frankenthaler’s formative collaborations with master printers Tatyana Grosman and Kenneth Tyler.

Urs Fischer and Francesco Bonami speaking amidst the installation of "Urs Fischer: Lovers" at Museo Jumex, Mexico City

Urs Fischer: Lovers

The exhibition Urs Fischer: Lovers at Museo Jumex, Mexico City, brings together works from international public and private collections as well as from the artist’s own archive, alongside new pieces made especially for the exhibition. To mark this momentous twenty-year survey, the artist sits down with the exhibition’s curator, Francesco Bonami, to discuss the installation.

Photograph of Serpertine Pavilion designed by Theaster Gates © Theaster Gates Studio. Photo: Iwan Baan, courtesy: Serpentine

Hans Ulrich Obrist’s Questionnaire: Theaster Gates

In this ongoing series, curator Hans Ulrich Obrist has devised a set of thirty-seven questions that invite artists, authors, musicians, and other visionaries to address key elements of their lives and creative practices. Respondents are invited to make a selection from the larger questionnaire and to reply in as many or as few words as they desire. For this installment, we are honored to present the artist Theaster Gates, whose Serpentine Pavilion 2022 Black Chapel opened in London on June 10.

Takashi Murakami cover and Andreas Gursky cover for Gagosian Quarterly, Summer 2022 magazine

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2022

The Summer 2022 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, with two different covers—featuring Takashi Murakami’s 108 Bonnō MURAKAMI.FLOWERS (2022) and Andreas Gursky’s V & R II (2022).

Mary Weatherford, The Flaying of Marsyas—4500 Triphosphor, 2021–22 (detail), Flashe and neon on linen, 93 × 79 inches (236.2 × 200.7 cm). Photo: Fredrik Nilsen Studio

Mary Weatherford: The Flaying of Marsyas

Coinciding with the 59th Venice Biennale, an exhibition at the Museo di Palazzo Grimani in Venice presents new paintings by Mary Weatherford inspired by Titian’s The Flaying of Marsyas (1570–76). Francine Prose traces the development of these works.

Installation view, Georg Baselitz: Archinto, Museo di Palazzo Grimani, Venice, May 19, 2021–November 27, 2022. Photo: Matteo De Fina

Georg Baselitz: Archinto

On the occasion of Georg Baselitz: Archinto at Museo di Palazzo Grimani, Venice, Artcore Films produced a short documentary featuring the artist. In the video, Baselitz details the origins of the project, how he approached the unique space, and his experiments in process and technique.