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Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Die große Nacht im Eimer (The Big Night Down the Drain), 1962–63 Oil on canvas, 98 ½ × 70 ⅞ inches (250 × 180 cm), Museum Ludwig, Cologne© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Die große Nacht im Eimer (The Big Night Down the Drain), 1962–63

Oil on canvas, 98 ½ × 70 ⅞ inches (250 × 180 cm), Museum Ludwig, Cologne
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Bonjour Monsieur Courbet, 1965 Oil on canvas, 63 ¾ × 51 ¼ inches (162 × 130 cm)© Georg Baselitz 2018. Photo: Ulrich Ghezzi

Georg Baselitz, Bonjour Monsieur Courbet, 1965

Oil on canvas, 63 ¾ × 51 ¼ inches (162 × 130 cm)
© Georg Baselitz 2018. Photo: Ulrich Ghezzi

Georg Baselitz, Untitled, 1967 Woodcut on paper, 14 ⅞ × 12 ⅜ inches (38 × 31.5 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Untitled, 1967

Woodcut on paper, 14 ⅞ × 12 ⅜ inches (38 × 31.5 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Ralf W. - Penck - Kopfbild (Ralf W. - Penck - Head Painting), 1969 Oil on canvas, 63 ¾ × 51 ¼ inches (162 × 130 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Ralf W. - Penck - Kopfbild (Ralf W. - Penck - Head Painting), 1969

Oil on canvas, 63 ¾ × 51 ¼ inches (162 × 130 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Kahlschlag (Clearcutting), 1970 Oil and acrylic on canvas, 55 ⅛ × 78 ¾ inches (140 × 200 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Kahlschlag (Clearcutting), 1970

Oil and acrylic on canvas, 55 ⅛ × 78 ¾ inches (140 × 200 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Der Falke (The Falcon), 1971 Oil and acrylic on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 66 ⅞ inches (180 × 170 cm), The Doris and Donald Fisher Collection at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Der Falke (The Falcon), 1971

Oil and acrylic on canvas, 70 ⅞ × 66 ⅞ inches (180 × 170 cm), The Doris and Donald Fisher Collection at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Fingermalerei - Akt (Finger Painting - Nude), 1972 Oil on canvas, 78 ¾ × 63 ¾ inches (200 × 162 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Fingermalerei - Akt (Finger Painting - Nude), 1972

Oil on canvas, 78 ¾ × 63 ¾ inches (200 × 162 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Schlafzimmer (Bedroom), 1975 Oil and charcoal on canvas, 98 ½ × 78 ¾ inches (250 × 200 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Schlafzimmer (Bedroom), 1975

Oil and charcoal on canvas, 98 ½ × 78 ¾ inches (250 × 200 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Birnbaum II (Pear Tree II), 1980 Oil, egg tempera, and asphalt on canvas, 98 ½ × 78 ¾ inches (250 × 200 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Birnbaum II (Pear Tree II), 1980

Oil, egg tempera, and asphalt on canvas, 98 ½ × 78 ¾ inches (250 × 200 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Die Mädchen von Olmo II (The Girls from Olmo II), 1981 Oil on canvas, 98 ½ × 98 ⅛ inches (250 × 249 cm), Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Die Mädchen von Olmo II (The Girls from Olmo II), 1981

Oil on canvas, 98 ½ × 98 ⅛ inches (250 × 249 cm), Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Orangenesser (IX) (Orange Eater [IX]), 1981 Oil and tempera on canvas, 57 ½ × 44 ⅞ inches (146 × 114 cm)© Georg Baselitz, 2018. Photo: Friedrich Rosenstiel, Köln

Georg Baselitz, Orangenesser (IX) (Orange Eater [IX]), 1981

Oil and tempera on canvas, 57 ½ × 44 ⅞ inches (146 × 114 cm)
© Georg Baselitz, 2018. Photo: Friedrich Rosenstiel, Köln

Georg Baselitz, Dresdner Frauen (Women of Dresden), 1989–90 Wood and tempera, installation dimensions variable© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Dresdner Frauen (Women of Dresden), 1989–90

Wood and tempera, installation dimensions variable
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Meine neue Mütze (My New Hat), 2003 Cedar and oil paint, 122 ¼ × 32 ⅞ × 42 ⅛ inches (310.5 × 83.5 × 107 cm), Pinault Collection, Venice© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Meine neue Mütze (My New Hat), 2003

Cedar and oil paint, 122 ¼ × 32 ⅞ × 42 ⅛ inches (310.5 × 83.5 × 107 cm), Pinault Collection, Venice
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Franz Pforr Ganz Groß (Remix) (Franz Pforr Very Big [Remix]), 2006 Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 157 ½ inches (300 × 400 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Franz Pforr Ganz Groß (Remix) (Franz Pforr Very Big [Remix]), 2006

Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 157 ½ inches (300 × 400 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Louise Fuller, 2013 Patinated bronze, 137 ⅞ × 50 ⅞ × 46 ⅞ inches (350 × 129 × 119 cm), edition of 6 + 2 AP© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Louise Fuller, 2013

Patinated bronze, 137 ⅞ × 50 ⅞ × 46 ⅞ inches (350 × 129 × 119 cm), edition of 6 + 2 AP
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Greenberg grient (Greenberg grins), 2013 Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 108 ¼ inches (300 × 275 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Greenberg grient (Greenberg grins), 2013

Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 108 ¼ inches (300 × 275 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Immer noch unterwegs (Still on the Road), 2014 Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 157 ½ inches (300 × 400 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Immer noch unterwegs (Still on the Road), 2014

Oil on canvas, 118 ⅛ × 157 ½ inches (300 × 400 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Untitled, 2015 Ink pen, watercolor, and India ink on paper, left: 26 ⅛ × 20 inches (66.3 × 50.8 cm), right: 26 ⅛ × 20 ⅛ inches (66.2 × 50.9 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Untitled, 2015

Ink pen, watercolor, and India ink on paper, left: 26 ⅛ × 20 inches (66.3 × 50.8 cm), right: 26 ⅛ × 20 ⅛ inches (66.2 × 50.9 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Untitled, 2015 India ink pen and India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 130 ⅜ × 58 ½ inches (331 × 148.5 cm)© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Untitled, 2015

India ink pen and India ink on paper mounted on canvas, 130 ⅜ × 58 ½ inches (331 × 148.5 cm)
© Georg Baselitz

Installation view of Avignon (2014) by Georg Baselitz at Biennale di Venezia, Venice, May 9–November 22, 2015 © Georg Baselitz

Installation view of Avignon (2014) by Georg Baselitz at Biennale di Venezia, Venice, May 9–November 22, 2015

© Georg Baselitz

Georg Baselitz, Lieber Marcel Duchamp, das haben sie doch von Picasso gestohlen! (Dear Marcel Duchamp, You Stole That from Picasso!), 2016 Oil on canvas, 161 ½ × 120 ⅛ inches (410 × 305 cm)© Georg Baselitz 2016. Photo: Jochen Littkemann, Berlin

Georg Baselitz, Lieber Marcel Duchamp, das haben sie doch von Picasso gestohlen! (Dear Marcel Duchamp, You Stole That from Picasso!), 2016

Oil on canvas, 161 ½ × 120 ⅛ inches (410 × 305 cm)
© Georg Baselitz 2016. Photo: Jochen Littkemann, Berlin

About

This idea of “looking toward the future” is nonsense. I realized that simply going backwards is better. You stand in the rear of the train—looking at the tracks flying back below—or you stand at the stern of a boat and look back—looking back at what’s gone.
—Georg Baselitz

German painter, printmaker, and sculptor Georg Baselitz is a pioneering postwar artist who rejected abstraction in favor of recognizable subject matter, deliberately employing a raw style of rendering and a heightened palette in order to convey direct emotion. Embracing the German Expressionism that had been denounced by the Nazis, Baselitz returned the human figure to a central position in painting.

Born Hans-Georg Kern in Deutschbaselitz, Saxony, Germany, Baselitz attended the Hochschule für Bildende und Angewandte Kunst in East Berlin, from which he was expelled in 1957 for “sociopolitical immaturity.” He then moved to West Berlin, where he attended the Hochschule der Künste and completed his postgraduate studies in 1962. It was during this time that he changed his surname to Baselitz. From his youth, Baselitz had been interested in the German Expressionists’ use of “primitive” sources such as folk art, children’s art, and art of the mentally ill. To assert his independence from popular art of the postwar years, Baselitz and fellow artist Eugen Schönebeck wrote the manifesto “Pandemonium” (1960–62), a violent and shocking expression of the frustration of working in postwar Germany. In 1963 Baselitz had his first solo exhibition, which was an immediate scandal: the painting Die große Nacht im Eimer (Big Night Down the Drain) (1962–63), depicting a distorted figure holding an oversized phallus, was removed from the exhibition due to charges of obscenity and not returned to Baselitz until the conclusion of a lengthy trial. In 1965 Baselitz turned to the subject of “heroes.” Painted in thick impasto, the Helden (Heroes) (1965–66)—also known as the Neue Typen (New Types or New Guys)—portray men standing within natural landscapes. Disheveled and fragmented, these war-torn figures elicit an emotional response in the viewer as they evoke the events of recent history.

In 1969 Baselitz began to paint and display his subjects upside down in order to slow down his process of painting as well as the viewer’s comprehension of the motif. These iconic paintings, depicting inverted figures, landscapes, and still lifes, achieve a form of abstraction while maintaining figuration. Through the 1980s, his work took on an added density as he further employed a wide range of formal and historical references, including the paintings of Edvard Munch and Emil Nolde. Concurrently, he began creating large-scale sculptures made of painted wood, presenting these works for the first time at the 1980 Biennale di Venezia, where he showed Modell fur eine Skulptur (Model for a Sculpture) (1979–80).

The paintings that Baselitz produced between 1990 and 2010 marked another shift in his practice, displaying a more linear and abstract approach to the figure. In the Remix series (2005–08), Baselitz revisited his earlier works, graphically re-presenting his prior subjects such that their subtle meanings and technical innovations were made more explicit. In 2015 Baselitz’s Avignon (2014) paintings—a suite of eight towering nude self-portraits—were featured in the Biennale di Venezia. The following year related self-portraits with spectral figures were presented at Gagosian, West 21st Street, New York. In 2017–18 a large retrospective of Baselitz’s work was presented at the Fondation Beyeler, Riehen, Switzerland, and at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.

Georg Baselitz

Photo: Elke Baselitz

Georg Baselitz working on a painting in his studio.

Georg Baselitz: What if...

Richard Calvocoressi narrates a tour of an exhibition of new paintings by Georg Baselitz in San Francisco, describing the visual effect of these luminous compositions and explaining their relationship to earlier works by the artist.

Georg Baselitz and Zeng Fanzhi. Portraits of both artists in black-and-white.

Artist to Artist: Georg Baselitz and Zeng Fanzhi

On the occasion of Georg Baselitz: Years later at Gagosian, Hong Kong, Zeng Fanzhi composed a written foreword for the exhibition’s catalogue and a video message to the German painter. Baselitz wrote a letter of thanks to the Chinese artist for his insightful thoughts.

Georg Baselitz, Da sind zwei Figuren im alten Stil (That’s two figures in the old style), 2019, oil and painter’s gold varnish on canvas

Georg Baselitz: Life, Love, Death

Richard Calvocoressi writes on the painter’s latest bodies of work, detailing the techniques employed and their historical precedents.

Featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2020

The Summer 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Joan Jonas’s Mirror Piece 1 (1969) on its cover.

Georg Baselitz, Ohne Titel (nach Pontormo) (Untitled [after Pontormo]), 1961.

Baselitz Bildung

On the occasion of a career-spanning exhibition at the Gallerie dell’Accademia, Venice, Richard Calvocoressi tracks the evolution of Georg Baselitz’s development from his early education in East Germany to his revelatory trip to Florence, in 1965, and beyond.

Still from video Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Visions of the Self: Jenny Saville on Rembrandt

Jenny Saville reveals the process behind her new self-portrait, painted in response to Rembrandt’s masterpiece Self-Portrait with Two Circles.

Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2019

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Summer 2019

The Summer 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring a detail from Afrylic by Ellen Gallagher on its cover.

Baselitz: Devotion

Baselitz: Devotion

Georg Baselitz speaks with Sir Norman Rosenthal on the subject of his latest work. The two discuss these paintings, all depictions of self-portraits by artists from the past and present, and what it means to pay homage.

Baselitz

Baselitz

Morgan Falconer visits the artist’s studio outside Munich to learn more about his newest paintings, a series entitled Devotion.

Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2019

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Spring 2019

The Spring 2019 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Red Pot with Lute Player #2 by Jonas Wood on its cover.

Fairs, Events & Announcements

Helen Frankenthaler, Orange Underline, 1963 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Art Fair

Basel Online 2020

In our most significant online sales presentation to date, Gagosian unveils important works by modern and contemporary masters through two separate online platforms—Gagosian Online and Art Basel Online. These individually curated selections offer collectors direct access to artworks of the highest caliber. To experience the presentation in its entirety, viewers will need to visit both gagosian.com and artbasel.com. The works on gagosian.com will rotate every forty-eight hours, for a total of five cycles.

Helen Frankenthaler, Orange Underline, 1963 © 2020 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Georg Baselitz: Years later (New York: Gagosian, 2020)

Online Reading

Georg Baselitz
Years later

Georg Baselitz: Years later is available for online reading from May 18 through August 8 as part of the From the Library series. The book documents an exhibition of new paintings and works on paper by Baselitz opening at Gagosian in Hong Kong on May 21, the first show to open to the public within our international network of galleries since the global COVID-19 lockdown. The bilingual English-Chinese publication includes a foreword by Zeng Fanzhi and essay by Lu Mingjun.

Georg Baselitz: Years later (New York: Gagosian, 2020)

Takashi Murakami, Kiki, 2018–20 © 2020 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved

Art Fair

Art Basel Hong Kong Online

March 20–25, 2020

Works by Georg Baselitz, Jennifer Guidi, Tetsuya Ishida, Jia Aili, Takashi Murakami, Mary Weatherford, Tom Wesselmann, and Zeng Fanzhi were available exclusively online. The selection was also on view in the Art Basel Hong Kong Online Viewing Rooms, accessible through artbasel.com and the Art Basel app.

Takashi Murakami, Kiki, 2018–20 © 2020 Takashi Murakami/Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd. All rights reserved

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Museum Exhibitions

Installation view, Inspiraatio—Nykytaide & Klassikot, Ateneum, Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki, June 18–September 20, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Glenn Brown, © Wolfe von Lenkiewicz. Photo: Hannu Pakarinen

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Inspiraatio—Nykytaide & Klassikot

June 18–September 20, 2020
Ateneum, Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki
ateneum.fi

This exhibition, whose title translates to Inspiration—Contemporary Art and Classics, explores contemporary art inspired by iconic masterpieces. Here, the original works are referenced through replicas, prints, plaster casts, and an abundance of archival materials. This exhibition has traveled from the Nationalmuseum, Stockholm, under the title Inspiration: Iconic Works. Work by Georg Baselitz, Glenn Brown, Jeff Koons, and Jenny Saville is included.

Installation view, Inspiraatio—Nykytaide & Klassikot, Ateneum, Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki, June 18–September 20, 2020. Artwork, left to right: © Glenn Brown, © Wolfe von Lenkiewicz. Photo: Hannu Pakarinen

Installation view, Contemporary Art: Five Propositions, Museum of Fine Art, Boston, October 26, 2019–May 4, 2020

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Contemporary Art
Five Propositions

October 26, 2019–May 4, 2020
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
www.mfa.org

Through five thematic groupings, this exhibition seeks to rethink the stories that can be told with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston’s collection of contemporary art. The groupings address a range of topics, including artistic process and complex relationships between humans and the natural world, the body, materials, identity, and notions of utopia. Work by Georg Baselitz, Helen Frankenthaler, and Andy Warhol is included.

Installation view, Contemporary Art: Five Propositions, Museum of Fine Art, Boston, October 26, 2019–May 4, 2020

Anselm Kiefer, Wege, 1977–80 © Anselm Kiefer. Photo: Charles Duprat

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Die jungen Jahre der Alten Meister
Baselitz–Richter–Polke–Kiefer

September 13, 2019–January 5, 2020
Deichtorhallen Hamburg, Germany
www.deichtorhallen.de

This exhibition, whose title translates to The Early Years of the Old Masters, explores the early works of Georg Baselitz, Anselm Kiefer, Sigmar Polke, and Gerhard Richter.

Anselm Kiefer, Wege, 1977–80 © Anselm Kiefer. Photo: Charles Duprat

Emilio Vedova and Georg Baselitz at documenta 7, Kassel, Germany, 1982. Photo: Benjamin Katz

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Emilio Vedova di/by Georg Baselitz

April 18–November 3, 2019
Fondazione Emilio e Annabianca Vedova, Venice
www.fondazionevedova.org

To celebrate the centenary of the birth of Emilio Vedova, Georg Baselitz has curated an exhibition of works by the Italian artist. The show presents two series of black-and-white works on canvas that mark significant moments in Vedova’s long and complex artistic career.

Emilio Vedova and Georg Baselitz at documenta 7, Kassel, Germany, 1982. Photo: Benjamin Katz

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Press

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