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Caro and North American Painters

January 27–March 5, 2022
Grosvenor Hill, London

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Installation video

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Barford Sculptures Ltd.; © 2022 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Barford Sculptures Ltd.; © 2022 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © 2022 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Barford Sculptures Ltd.; © 2022 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SOCAN, Montreal. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © 2022 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Barford Sculptures Ltd.; © 2022 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SOCAN, Montreal. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Barford Sculptures Ltd.; © 2022 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SOCAN, Montreal; © 2021 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Barford Sculptures Ltd.; © 2022 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SOCAN, Montreal; © 2021 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Barford Sculptures Ltd.; © Larry Poons/VAGA, New York, and DACS, London 2022; © 2022 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Barford Sculptures Ltd.; © Larry Poons/VAGA, New York, and DACS, London 2022; © 2022 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Larry Poons/VAGA, New York, and DACS, London 2022; © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Barford Sculptures Ltd. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Larry Poons/VAGA, New York, and DACS, London 2022; © 2022 Helen Frankenthaler Foundation, Inc./Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; © Barford Sculptures Ltd. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Works Exhibited

Anthony Caro, Month of May, 1963 Painted steel and aluminum, 110 ⅛ × 120 ⅛ × 141 ⅛ inches (279.5 × 305 × 358.5 cm)© Barford Sculptures Ltd.

Anthony Caro, Month of May, 1963

Painted steel and aluminum, 110 ⅛ × 120 ⅛ × 141 ⅛ inches (279.5 × 305 × 358.5 cm)
© Barford Sculptures Ltd.

Jack Bush, Brown Pole, 1967 Acrylic on canvas, 57 ⅞ × 26 ⅝ inches (147 × 67.6 cm)© 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SOCAN, Montreal. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Jack Bush, Brown Pole, 1967

Acrylic on canvas, 57 ⅞ × 26 ⅝ inches (147 × 67.6 cm)
© 2021 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SOCAN, Montreal. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Anthony Caro, Smoulder, 1965 Painted steel, 42 × 183 ⅛ × 33 ⅛ inches (106.5 × 465 × 84 cm)© Barford Sculptures Ltd. Photo: Mike Bruce

Anthony Caro, Smoulder, 1965

Painted steel, 42 × 183 ⅛ × 33 ⅛ inches (106.5 × 465 × 84 cm)
© Barford Sculptures Ltd. Photo: Mike Bruce

Kenneth Noland, Exmoor, 1970–71 Acrylic on canvas, 76 ⅝ × 138 ¼ inches (194.6 × 351 cm)© 2021 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

Kenneth Noland, Exmoor, 1970–71

Acrylic on canvas, 76 ⅝ × 138 ¼ inches (194.6 × 351 cm)
© 2021 The Kenneth Noland Foundation/Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd

About

America made me see that there are no barriers and no regulations.
—Anthony Caro

Gagosian is pleased to announce Caro and North American Painters, an exhibition of sculptures by Anthony Caro from the 1960s and 1970s shown together with contemporaneous paintings by his friends and peers.

Contextualizing aesthetic dialogues between Caro and his fellow artists, Caro and North American Painters features significant floor sculptures by Caro including Capital (1960), Month of May (1963), Smoulder (1965), and Hog Flats (1974). Paired with these works are paintings by American artists Helen Frankenthaler, Kenneth Noland, Jules Olitski, and Larry Poons, as well as Canadian artist Jack Bush.

Caro was among the most influential British sculptors of his generation and his career had a transatlantic reach. During a trip to the United States in 1959, he observed the emerging American art firsthand, encountering the work of David Smith and befriending Frankenthaler, Noland, and critic Clement Greenberg. Upon his return to London, he initiated a radical new approach to his practice by welding and bolting together steel beams, plates, tubes, and other elements. In the 1960s he painted these constructions in bold, flat colors, developing a range of other finishes over the course of the subsequent decade. As one of the first artists to discard the traditional sculptural pedestal, Caro made works that occupy the same space as the viewer, and by grounding them with horizontal elements combined with linear and planar structures, he effectively activated their surroundings.

Read more

Artists

Jack Bush
Anthony Caro
Helen Frankenthaler
Kenneth Noland
Jules Olitski
Larry Poons

Press

Gagosian
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Ashleigh Barice
presslondon@gagosian.com

Bolton & Quinn
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Erica Bolton
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Daisy Taylor
daisy@boltonquinn.com

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