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Nancy Rubins

Nancy Rubins, Chas’ Stainless Steel, Mark Thomson’s Airplane Parts,
about 1,000 lbs. of Stainless Steel Wire & Gagosian’s Beverly Hills Space
at MOCA, 2002 Airplane parts, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 25 × 54 × 33 feet (7.6 × 16.5 × 10.1 m), Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Brian Guido

Nancy Rubins, Chas’ Stainless Steel, Mark Thomson’s Airplane Parts, about 1,000 lbs. of Stainless Steel Wire & Gagosian’s Beverly Hills Space at MOCA, 2002

Airplane parts, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 25 × 54 × 33 feet (7.6 × 16.5 × 10.1 m), Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Brian Guido

Nancy Rubins, Big Pleasure Point, 2006 Boats, stainless steel, and stainless steel wire cable, 45 × 55 × 40 feet (13.7 × 16.8 × 12.2 m)Installation view, Lincoln Center, New York, presented in partnership with Public Art Fund© Nancy Rubins

Nancy Rubins, Big Pleasure Point, 2006

Boats, stainless steel, and stainless steel wire cable, 45 × 55 × 40 feet (13.7 × 16.8 × 12.2 m)
Installation view, Lincoln Center, New York, presented in partnership with Public Art Fund
© Nancy Rubins

Nancy Rubins, Monochrome for Chicago, 2012 Aluminum boats, stainless steel, and stainless steel wire cable, 40 × 35 × 33 feet (12.2 × 10.7 × 10.1 m)Installation view, Navy Pier, Chicago© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Erich Koyama

Nancy Rubins, Monochrome for Chicago, 2012

Aluminum boats, stainless steel, and stainless steel wire cable, 40 × 35 × 33 feet (12.2 × 10.7 × 10.1 m)
Installation view, Navy Pier, Chicago
© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Erich Koyama

Nancy Rubins, Study Model (Monochrome for Paris), 2012 Handmade painted wood model boats, epoxy putty, and steel armature, 66 ¾ × 63 ⅝ × 57 ⅝ inches (169.5 × 169.2 × 146.4 cm)© Nancy Rubins

Nancy Rubins, Study Model (Monochrome for Paris), 2012

Handmade painted wood model boats, epoxy putty, and steel armature, 66 ¾ × 63 ⅝ × 57 ⅝ inches (169.5 × 169.2 × 146.4 cm)
© Nancy Rubins

Nancy Rubins, Chunkus Majoris, 2013 Aluminum, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 12 feet 6 inches × 16 feet × 12 feet 1 inch (3.8 × 4.9 × 3.7 m)© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nancy Rubins, Chunkus Majoris, 2013

Aluminum, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 12 feet 6 inches × 16 feet × 12 feet 1 inch (3.8 × 4.9 × 3.7 m)
© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Rob McKeever

Nancy Rubins, Our Friend Fluid Metal, 2014 Aluminum, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 17 feet × 41 feet 8 inches × 23 feet 3 inches (5.2 × 12.7 × 7.1 m)© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Erich Ansel Koyama

Nancy Rubins, Our Friend Fluid Metal, 2014

Aluminum, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 17 feet × 41 feet 8 inches × 23 feet 3 inches (5.2 × 12.7 × 7.1 m)
© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Erich Ansel Koyama

Installation view, Nancy Rubins: Our Friend Fluid Metal, Gagosian, West 21st Street, New York, July 17–September 13, 2014 Artwork © Nancy Rubins. Photo: Erich Ansel Koyama

Installation view, Nancy Rubins: Our Friend Fluid Metal, Gagosian, West 21st Street, New York, July 17–September 13, 2014

Artwork © Nancy Rubins. Photo: Erich Ansel Koyama

Nancy Rubins, Hog de la Ivy, 2016–17 Cast iron, aluminum, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 9 feet 4 inches × 13 feet 10 inches × 11 feet 7 inches (2.8 × 4.2 × 3.5 m)© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Joel Searles

Nancy Rubins, Hog de la Ivy, 2016–17

Cast iron, aluminum, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 9 feet 4 inches × 13 feet 10 inches × 11 feet 7 inches (2.8 × 4.2 × 3.5 m)
© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Joel Searles

Nancy Rubins, Agrifolia Majoris, 2017 Cast aluminum, brass, bronze, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 14 feet 3 inches × 19 feet 3 inches × 17 feet 9 inches (43.4 × 58.7 × 54.1 m)© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Nancy Rubins, Agrifolia Majoris, 2017

Cast aluminum, brass, bronze, stainless steel armature, and stainless steel wire cable, 14 feet 3 inches × 19 feet 3 inches × 17 feet 9 inches (43.4 × 58.7 × 54.1 m)
© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Nancy Rubins, Drawing, 2010–18 Graphite on rag paper, 16 feet 3 ¾ inches × 17 feet 1 ⅞ inches × 2 feet 7 ½ inches (497 × 523 × 80 cm)© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

Nancy Rubins, Drawing, 2010–18

Graphite on rag paper, 16 feet 3 ¾ inches × 17 feet 1 ⅞ inches × 2 feet 7 ½ inches (497 × 523 × 80 cm)
© Nancy Rubins. Photo: Lucy Dawkins

About

I realized that this stuff has been around a long time, and it’s passed through this odd transition.  Before it was in the earth, it was floating as a molecule in outer space—it was part of somebody’s star, or part of somebody’s exploding planet. 
—Nancy Rubins

Through sculptures assembled from discarded materials and graphite drawings that assume the appearance of liquid metal, Nancy Rubins transforms quotidian objects into artworks that exceed the sums of their parts. She explores the precariousness and limits of natural forces through large-format pieces with formidable psychological and physical presence. Working with salvaged commercial and industrial materials since the late 1970s, Rubins frequently combines features of assemblage and monumental sculpture to create dynamic works that are at once familiar and otherworldly.

Rubins has been preoccupied with achieving seemingly impossible production feats throughout much of her artistic career, bridging the worlds of engineering and art. In 1974 she completed a BFA at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore and then moved to the West Coast to study at the University of California at Davis, where she received an MFA two years later. Around this time, she began collecting used appliances—from hair dryers to electric shavers, toaster ovens to televisions—which she included in large, semiflexible wall-like sculptures. Initially sourcing her materials from garbage dumps and thrift stores, Rubins mined not only the vast quantities of objects at her disposal, but also the history of each salvaged item.

From her early-1980s accumulations of domestic devices, which she assembled into gigantic tornado- or tidal-wave-shaped forms, Rubins’s practice evolved in the 1990s to include immense clusters of sizeable objects, such as boats, mattresses, or the deconstructed parts of enormously complex, manufactured machinery like airplanes and trailers. Rubins amasses these components into biological or arboreal growth patterns that often cantilever over pedestrian traffic below. As she does so, she continues to focus on the formal qualities of the salvaged objects.

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Fairs, Events & Announcements

Frank Gehry, Wishful Thinking, 2021, installation view, Frank Gehry: Spinning Tales, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, 2021 © Frank O. Gehry. Photo: Joshua White

Visit

Gallery Weekend LA
Frank Gehry, Albert Oehlen, Nancy Rubins

July 28–August 1, 2021
Los Angeles
weekend.galleryplatform.la

Gagosian is participating in the inaugural Gallery Weekend LA with three exhibitions. Frank Gehry: Spinning Tales and Nancy Rubins: Fluid Space, both on view at Gagosian’s Beverly Hills location, will be open for extended hours during Gallery Weekend LA (July 28: 10am–7pm; July 29–30: 10am–5:30pm; July 31–August 1: 12–6pm). Visitors can also see Albert Oehlen: Tramonto Spaventoso with an appointment, on view at the Marciano Art Foundation (July 28–31: 11am–5pm). The event is organized through Gallery Association Los Angeles and galleryplatform.la and includes nearly eighty-five of the city’s leading contemporary art galleries and museums.

Frank Gehry, Wishful Thinking, 2021, installation view, Frank Gehry: Spinning Tales, Gagosian, Beverly Hills, 2021 © Frank O. Gehry. Photo: Joshua White

Left: Nancy Rubins. Photo: Joel Searles. Right: Eric Shiner. Photo: Walker Olesen

In Conversation

Nancy Rubins
Eric Shiner

Tuesday, August 3, 2021, 1pm edt

Join Gagosian for an online conversation between Nancy Rubins and Eric Shiner inside the artist’s exhibition Fluid Space, on view at Gagosian, Beverly Hills, through August 6. The pair will discuss Rubins’s unique approach to sculpture, in which industrial and found objects—such as television sets, airplane parts, and carousel animals—are transformed into engineered abstractions that are at once otherworldly and familiar. To join, register at eventbrite.com.

Left: Nancy Rubins. Photo: Joel Searles. Right: Eric Shiner. Photo: Walker Olesen

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Breonna Taylor, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

Support

Show Me the Signs

November 10–30, 2020

Show Me the Signs is an online benefit auction hosted by Artfizz to support the families of Black women killed by the police. Over 100 artists have created pieces in the form of protest signs for the auction, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the African American Policy Forum’s #SayHerName Mothers Network. Work by Louise Bonnet, Piero Golia, Meleko Mokgosi, Nathaniel Mary Quinn, and Nancy Rubins is included. To register to bid, visit artfizz.com.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn, Breonna Taylor, 2020 © Nathaniel Mary Quinn

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Museum Exhibitions

Chris Burden, Exposing the Foundation of the Museum, 1986 © 2019 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Squidds and Nunns

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The Foundation of the Museum
MOCA’s Collection

May 19, 2019–January 20, 2020
Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, Los Angeles
www.moca.org

To mark the museum’s fortieth anniversary, this exhibition presents a selected topography of artworks that speak to the diversity of MOCA’s collecting over the past four decades. With special emphasis on works associated with the museum’s remarkable history of exhibitions, The Foundation of the Museum: MOCA’s Collection shows the institution’s holdings as shaped by a changing landscape of developments in contemporary art and curatorial focus, as well by as the social and cultural backdrops that inform them. Work by Chris Burden, Mike Kelley, Bruce Nauman, Albert Oehlen, Nancy Rubins, and Ed Ruscha is included.

Chris Burden, Exposing the Foundation of the Museum, 1986 © 2019 Chris Burden/Licensed by the Chris Burden Estate and Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Squidds and Nunns

Nancy Rubins, Agrifauna Delicata I, 2017 © Nancy Rubins

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Nancy Rubins in
ARTZUID 2019

May 17–September 15, 2019
Amsterdam
www.artzuid.nl

The sixth edition of the Amsterdam Sculpture Biennial presents more than sixty figurative sculptures and spatial installations. Work by Nancy Rubins is included.

Nancy Rubins, Agrifauna Delicata I, 2017 © Nancy Rubins

Nancy Rubins, Drawing, 2005 © Nancy Rubins

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Paper into Sculpture

October 14, 2017–February 4, 2018
Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas
www.nashersculpturecenter.org

This exhibition plays on tensions between commonly held understandings of sculpture and what paper can and cannot do, pushed to its physical limits. Treating paper as a material with a palpable three-dimensional presence rather than as a mere support for mark making, artists in this show use processes ranging from tearing, crumpling, and cutting to scattering, binding, and adhering to create sculptural works that take a variety of forms and suggest a range of expressive and conceptual implications. Work by Nancy Rubins and Franz West is included.

Nancy Rubins, Drawing, 2005 © Nancy Rubins

Nancy Rubins, Drawing, 2005 © Nancy Rubins

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Gray Matters

May 20–July 30, 2017
Wexner Center for the Arts, The Ohio State University, Columbus
wexarts.org

This multifaceted survey features the work of thirty-seven contemporary women artists who have explored the practice of creating en grisaille—in shades of gray. The works on display reveal the truly vibrant and variegated spectrum of black, white, and gray. Work by Nancy Rubins and Rachel Whiteread is included.

Nancy Rubins, Drawing, 2005 © Nancy Rubins

Press

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