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Close at Hand

Modern and Contemporary Sculpture

January 9–February 24, 2018
San Francisco

Installation view

Installation view

Works Exhibited

Richard Artschwager, Corner, 1992 Paint, wood, Formica, and chrome, 36 × 14 ¼ × 4 ½ inches (91.4 × 36.2 × 11.4 cm), edition of 30© 2017 Richard Artschwager/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Richard Artschwager, Corner, 1992

Paint, wood, Formica, and chrome, 36 × 14 ¼ × 4 ½ inches (91.4 × 36.2 × 11.4 cm), edition of 30
© 2017 Richard Artschwager/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Alex Israel, Casting, 2015 Acrylic on bronze, in 2 parts, 16 × 12 × 5 ¾ inches (40.6 × 30.5 × 14.6 cm), edition of 8© Alex Israel. Photo: Josh White

Alex Israel, Casting, 2015

Acrylic on bronze, in 2 parts, 16 × 12 × 5 ¾ inches (40.6 × 30.5 × 14.6 cm), edition of 8
© Alex Israel. Photo: Josh White

Urs Fischer, Low Lying Cloud, 2016 Cast bronze, acrylic primer, chalk gesso, rabbit skin glue, and oil paint, 8 ¼ × 15 ¼ × 7 ½ inches (21 × 38.7 × 19.1 cm), edition of 2© Urs Fischer. Photo: Mats Nordman

Urs Fischer, Low Lying Cloud, 2016

Cast bronze, acrylic primer, chalk gesso, rabbit skin glue, and oil paint, 8 ¼ × 15 ¼ × 7 ½ inches (21 × 38.7 × 19.1 cm), edition of 2
© Urs Fischer. Photo: Mats Nordman

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Moss on Rock Heavy Texture Mask M16.d), 2012 Painted bronze, 43 ½ × 16 × 5 ¼ inches (110.5 × 40.6 × 13.3 cm)© Mark Grotjahn

Mark Grotjahn, Untitled (Moss on Rock Heavy Texture Mask M16.d), 2012

Painted bronze, 43 ½ × 16 × 5 ¼ inches (110.5 × 40.6 × 13.3 cm)
© Mark Grotjahn

Shio Kusaka, (carved 116), 2016 Stoneware, 23 × 10 × 10 inches (58.4 × 25.4 × 25.4 cm)© Shio Kusaka. Photo: Brian Forrest

Shio Kusaka, (carved 116), 2016

Stoneware, 23 × 10 × 10 inches (58.4 × 25.4 × 25.4 cm)
© Shio Kusaka. Photo: Brian Forrest

Sterling Ruby, HEART (RWB. 86), 2017 Ceramic, 24 ¼ × 19 ½ × 3 inches (61.6 × 49.5 × 7.6 cm)© Sterling Ruby Studio

Sterling Ruby, HEART (RWB. 86), 2017

Ceramic, 24 ¼ × 19 ½ × 3 inches (61.6 × 49.5 × 7.6 cm)
© Sterling Ruby Studio

Tatiana Trouvé, Equivalence, 2015 (detail) Patinated bronze, metal, and copper, dimensions variable, edition of 3© Tatiana Trouvé. Photo: Rob McKeever

Tatiana Trouvé, Equivalence, 2015 (detail)

Patinated bronze, metal, and copper, dimensions variable, edition of 3
© Tatiana Trouvé. Photo: Rob McKeever

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (On/Off), 2001 Stainless steel, 4 parts, 2 ⅝ × 2 ⅝ × 1 ⅛ inches (6.5 × 6.5 × 2.7 cm), edition of 6© Rachel Whiteread

Rachel Whiteread, Untitled (On/Off), 2001

Stainless steel, 4 parts, 2 ⅝ × 2 ⅝ × 1 ⅛ inches (6.5 × 6.5 × 2.7 cm), edition of 6
© Rachel Whiteread

About

Gagosian is pleased to present Close at Hand, an exhibition of modern and contemporary sculpture.

Focusing on intimate gesture and free experimentation, Close at Hand reveals a breadth of formal, conceptual, and material approaches to sculpture, including assemblages, ceramics, and found objects. The exhibition presents varied embodiments of energy, motion, and time—both material and immaterial—within the purview of the human body.

Formalist oppositions between art and object are played out in sculptures by Anthony Caro and Tony Smith. In Table Piece Z-82 ‘Clarinet’ (1982), Caro orchestrates rusted and varnished metal components into a greater abstract whole, while in Mistake (1963), Smith proposes a singular geometric form, which abandons representational clues in order to consider the classic minimalist construct of spectacle and viewer.

Exploration of new materials can be seen in the making strange of common objects through a shift in their perceived properties. With Corner (1992), Richard Artschwager creates a cartoonish illusion that three planks of wood-patterned Formica, cinched tightly with a metal bracket, are exploding from a corner of the room. Rachel Whiteread’s Untitled (On / Off) (2001) a cast light-switch bank in stainless steel, further blurs the line between reality and representation, while Tatiana Trouvé’s Equivalences (2014), bronze cast refuse such as water bottles, cans, and scraps of cardboard are suspended in perfect balance from thin wire cables.

Gestural aspects of the sculptural process are captured in the surfaces of works by John Chamberlain and Franz West. Lucio Fontana’s Concetto Spaziale Cratere (1968) is a hand-formed porcelain sculpture with a jagged aperture that reveals its white interior, as if it has been shot through by one of Chris Burden’s Gold Bullets (2003), taxonomically arranged in two vitrines nearby.

Read more

Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on the cover of Gagosian Quarterly, Winter 2022

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Winter 2022

The Winter 2022 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available, featuring Anna Weyant’s Two Eileens (2022) on its cover.

Sterling Ruby studio

Sterling Ruby: TURBINES

Join Sterling Ruby in his Los Angeles studio as he works on new abstract paintings ahead of his exhibition TURBINES at Gagosian in New York.

Rachel Whiteread, Kunisaki House, 2021–22, concrete, 102 ½ × 305 ⅛ × 191 ⅜ inches (260 × 775 × 486 cm)

Rachel Whiteread: Shy Sculpture

On the occasion of the unveiling of her latest Shy Sculpture, in Kunisaki, Japan, Rachel Whiteread joined curator and art historian Fumio Nanjo for a conversation about this ongoing series.They address the origins of these sculptures and the details of each project.

Urs Fischer: Denominator

Urs Fischer: Denominator

Urs Fischer sits down with his friend the author and artist Eric Sanders to address the perfect viewer, the effects of marketing, and the limits of human understanding.

Image of Chloe Barter, John Kasmin and Paul Moorhouse

In Conversation
Chloe Barter, John Kasmin, and Paul Moorhouse on Anthony Caro

Join Chloe Barter, John Kasmin, and Paul Moorhouse as they discuss the work and legacy of Anthony Caro. Their conversation took place in conjunction with the exhibition Caro and North American Painters, which included sculptures by Anthony Caro from the 1960s and 1970s, shown together with contemporaneous paintings by his friends and peers.

Installation view, Tatiana Trouvé: The Great Atlas of Disorientation, Centre Pompidou, Paris

Tatiana Trouvé: Le grand atlas de la désorientation

In this video, Tatiana Trouvé provides an overview of her latest installation, presented at the Centre Pompidou, Paris. The exhibition, whose title translates to The Great Atlas of Disorientation, includes a selection of drawings and sculptures that create fantastical landscapes where reality engages in infinite exchanges with its doubles.