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Artists for Biden

October 2–8, 2020

Artists for Biden is an online-only sale of works by leading contemporary artists to support the Biden Victory Fund—a joint fundraising committee authorized by Biden for President, the Democratic National Committee, and forty-seven state Democratic parties. All proceeds from the sale will provide resources needed to elect Joe Biden and Kamala Harris and support other Democratic candidates across the country in the lead up to Election Day. Work by Cecily Brown, Michael Heizer, Jeff Koons, Roy Lichtenstein, Brice Marden, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Cindy Sherman, Sarah Sze, Stanley Whitney, and Christopher Wool will be available. To register for early access on October 1, visit secure.joebiden.com.

Sarah Sze, Afterimage, Silver, 2018 © Sarah Sze

Sarah Sze, Afterimage, Silver, 2018 © Sarah Sze

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The Fall 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly at Shreeji Newsagent, London

Panel Discussion

Artsy Webinar
The Art of Digital Storytelling

Wednesday, October 21, 2020, 11am–12pm EDT

Join Marina Cashdan, vice president of editorial and creative at Artsy; Alison McDonald, director of publications at Gagosian; Neil Wenman, partner and director of brand at Hauser & Wirth; and Alex Gilbert, associate director at Friedman Benda, for an online conversation on digital storytelling and content strategy for galleries. The speakers will share their expertise and perspectives on building brands and crafting compelling digital narratives. To register for the event, visit artsy.net.

The Fall 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly at Shreeji Newsagent, London

Rachel Whiteread, Cabin, 2016, permanent installation, Governors Island, New York © Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Tim Schenck

In Conversation

Tom Eccles and Kiki Smith on Rachel Whiteread

Tuesday, October 27, 2020, 2pm EDT

Join curator Tom Eccles and artist Kiki Smith as they discuss the work of Rachel Whiteread through the lens of their personal friendships with her. They talk about the way her works reveal the memory embedded in familiar everyday objects, her drawing practice, and their experience of public projects by Whiteread such as Water Tower, installed on a New York rooftop in 1998. Their conversation, recorded on the occasion of Artist Spotlight: Rachel Whiteread, will air online. To register to watch, complete this form.

Rachel Whiteread, Cabin, 2016, permanent installation, Governors Island, New York © Rachel Whiteread. Photo: Tim Schenck

Sarah Sze, Centrifuge, 2017 (detail) © Sarah Sze

Tour

Sarah Sze
Night into Day

Monday, October 19, 2020, 1pm EDT

On the occasion of Sarah Sze’s exhibition Night into Day, which opens at the Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporain, Paris, on October 24, Sze and French philosopher Bruno Latour will lead a livestream walkthrough of the exhibition, inviting the public to discover the artist’s immersive installations. To watch the live event, visit Fondation Cartier’s Instagram.

Sarah Sze, Centrifuge, 2017 (detail) © Sarah Sze

Still from the video "In Conversation: Rachel Whiteread and Ann Gallagher"

In Conversation
Rachel Whiteread and Ann Gallagher

Rachel Whiteread speaks to Ann Gallagher about a new group of resin sculptures for an upcoming exhibition at Gagosian in London. They discuss the works’ emphasis on surface texture, light, and reflection.

The crowd at the public funeral of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in April 1968. Photo by Moneta Sleet Jr.

Now available
Gagosian Quarterly Fall 2020

The Fall 2020 issue of Gagosian Quarterly is now available.

Piero della Francesca, The Baptism of Christ, after 1437, egg on poplar.

Rachel Whiteread on Piero della Francesca

Rachel Whiteread writes about the Italian artist’s Baptism of Christ (after 1437) and what has drawn her to this painting, from her first experience of it at a young age to the present day.

Titus Kaphar in his studio, touching his painting.

Titus Kaphar: From a Tropical Space

Join the artist in his studio in New Haven, Connecticut, where he speaks about his latest paintings.

Nathaniel Mary Quinn in his studio

Nathaniel Mary Quinn: In the Studio

Hear the painter describe the creation of a new work in this time-lapse documentation of his process.

Theaster Gates in his studio

Theaster Gates: Black Vessel

Join Theaster Gates in his studio as he prepares for an upcoming exhibition at Gagosian, New York. In this video, shot on location in Chicago during the tumultuous weeks of protest in late spring 2020, Gates reflects on the metaphorical power of materials and process, and on the redemptive potential of art.

Gregory Crewdson, Red Star Express, 2018–19, digital pigment print, 56 ¼ × 94 ⅞ inches (127 × 225.7 cm)

Gregory Crewdson: An Eclipse of Moths

Gregory Crewdson discusses his new work with actor Cate Blanchett.

Mary Weatherford, Orion’s Belt, 2016, Flashe and neon on linen.

Mary Weatherford: Train Yards

Mary Weatherford speaks to Laura Hoptman about her new paintings, the Train Yard series. Begun in 2016, this body of work evokes the sights and sounds of railroads and night skies. The series will be shown for the first time in late 2020, in an exhibition at Gagosian, London.

Louise Bonnet in her Los Angeles studio, 2020

Louise Bonnet

Filmmaker and author Miranda July joined Louise Bonnet on a video call to discuss life during lockdown, the luminosity of oil paint, and Bonnet’s forthcoming exhibition of new work. Longtime friends—and newly neighbors—the two reflect on their shared history and shared interests in the unconscious, vagueness, and the mixture of humor and pain.

Ed Ruscha, At That, 2020, dry pigment and acrylic on paper.

“Things Fall Apart”: Ed Ruscha’s Swiped Words

Lisa Turvey examines the range of effects conveyed by the blurred phrases in recent drawings by the artist, detailing the ways these words in motion evoke the experience of the current moment.

Bebe Miller and Cynthia Oliver in motion dancing, mid-jump, against a white background

Bebe Miller and Cynthia Oliver

The legendary choreographers discuss their history together, the evolution of Cynthia Oliver’s boom!, imposed boundaries on “Black dance,” and the choreographies of the pandemic.

Jay DeFeo working on The Rose (then titled Deathrose), photographed by Burt Glinn in 1960.

Jay DeFeo

Suzanne Hudson speaks with Leah Levy, executive director of the Jay DeFeo Foundation, about the artist’s life and work.