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Roy Lichtenstein

Sculpture

June 7–August 6, 2005
Britannia Street, London

Roy Lichtenstein, Glass II, 1976 Painted bronze, 37 ¾ × 22 × 13 ¾ inches (95.9 × 55.9 × 34.9 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Glass II, 1976

Painted bronze, 37 ¾ × 22 × 13 ¾ inches (95.9 × 55.9 × 34.9 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Galatea, 1990 Painted bronze, 89 × 32 × 19 inches (226.1 × 81.3 × 48.3 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Galatea, 1990

Painted bronze, 89 × 32 × 19 inches (226.1 × 81.3 × 48.3 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Endless Drip, 1995 Fabricated and painted aluminum, 142 ¼ × 13 ½ × 4 ½ inches (361.3 × 34.3 × 11.4 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Endless Drip, 1995

Fabricated and painted aluminum, 142 ¼ × 13 ½ × 4 ½ inches (361.3 × 34.3 × 11.4 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Newborn, 1989 Patinated bronze, 12 ¼ × 16 ¼ × 3 ½ inches (31.1 × 41.3 × 8.9 cm)© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein, Newborn, 1989

Patinated bronze, 12 ¼ × 16 ¼ × 3 ½ inches (31.1 × 41.3 × 8.9 cm)
© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

About

Gagosian is pleased to present the exhibition Roy Lichtenstein: Sculpture, which has been organized in collaboration with the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation. This extensive survey reflects over fifty years of Lichtenstein’s sculptural oeuvre. This exhibition will highlight the artist’s Head, Glass, and Brushstroke subjects.

The collision of high and low modes is the very strategy of his art, indeed of Pop in general, and here he extends it to sculpture as well: traditional bust meets abstract mannequin, Abstract Expressionist brushstroke meets cartoon sign of the same. Crucially, however, the reference to traditional genres not only frames this collision, but in doing so, controls it as well. And if there is a radical edge in Lichtenstein, it lies here: less in his thematic appropriation of comics and the like, and more in his formal reconciliation of lowly contents and high forms.
—Hal Foster

The sculptures embrace the dichotomy between content and form, as well as between two- and three-dimensionality. Lichtenstein’s sculptures are often reduced and flattened, yet through their graphic surfaces, he communicates the illusion of depth within a two-dimensional plane.

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