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Ed Ruscha

Busted Glass

October 2–November 17, 2007
Davies Street, London

Ed Ruscha, Cracked, 2007 Acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8 cm)

Ed Ruscha, Cracked, 2007

Acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8 cm)

Ed Ruscha, Shattered Glass #2, 2007 Acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8 cm)

Ed Ruscha, Shattered Glass #2, 2007

Acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8 cm)

Ed Ruscha, Busted Piece of Glass, 2007 Dry pigment and acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8cm)

Ed Ruscha, Busted Piece of Glass, 2007

Dry pigment and acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8cm)

Ed Ruscha, Smashed Pane, 2007 Acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8cm)

Ed Ruscha, Smashed Pane, 2007

Acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8cm)

Ed Ruscha, Dropped, 2007 Acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8cm)

Ed Ruscha, Dropped, 2007

Acrylic on museum board paper, 12 ¼ × 9 ⅜ inches (31.1 × 23.8cm)

About

Gagosian is pleased to present Busted Glass, a new series of drawings by Ed Ruscha.

Ruscha’s art defies easy categorization. He has recorded the shifting emblems of American life in the form of Hollywood logos and stylized gas stations. His choice of words and phrases mines the perpetual interplay between language as a physical thing and language as a transparent medium. The mystery of his drawings begins with drawing itself, and its equivocal position in Western art between the realms of objects and ideas.

In Busted Glass, Ruscha depicts with delicate precision panes of glass, cracked, broken, or in shards. The transparent substance and its elusive subject matter are defined only through subtle modulations of light and shade. And, like so many of his artistic emanations, these small and exquisite drawings contain a larger paradox.

Ruscha has often evoked the window as metaphor. In drawings from the ’80s, the shadow of a window crossbar and its light play became the background for words as a kind of self-reflexive artistic debate—a spectacle engaged in an assault on its own claims of realism. In Busted Glass, mimetic devices participate in their own undoing, as the artist discourses with the formal capacities of drawing. Drawing as a kind of graphological disclosure has an inveterate connection with gesture and its meaning. But in the new drawings is Ruscha’s hand creating the contingent fault line of the glass, or is he pointing to its form as something ultimately intangible?

A fully illustrated catalogue will accompany the exhibition.

News

Photo: Kate Simon

Artist Spotlight

Ed Ruscha

September 16–22, 2020

At the start of his artistic career, Ed Ruscha called himself an “abstract artist . . . who deals with subject matter.” Abandoning academic connotations that came to be associated with Abstract Expressionism, he looked instead to tropes of advertising and brought words—as form, symbol, and material—to the forefront of painting. Working in diverse media with humor and wit, he oscillates between sign and substance, locating the sublime in landscapes both natural and artificial. Ruscha’s formal experimentations and clever use of the American vernacular have evolved in form and meaning as technology alters the essence of human communication.

Photo: Kate Simon

Installation view, Ed Ruscha: Drum Skins, Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, Texas, January 11–October 4, 2020. Artwork © Ed Ruscha

galleryplatform.la

Ed Ruscha
Drum Skins

May 28–June 30, 2020

Gagosian is pleased to present recent paintings by Ed Ruscha online for galleryplatform.laFifty years ago, Ruscha purchased a set of vellum drum skins from a leather shop in Los Angeles. He has continued to collect these vintage objects, and since 2011 he has used them as canvases for the works on view in his solo exhibition Drum Skins at the Blanton Museum of Art in Austin, Texas. 

Installation view, Ed Ruscha: Drum Skins, Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, Texas, January 11–October 4, 2020. Artwork © Ed Ruscha