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CLEAR

July 25–August 22, 2014
Beverly Hills

Installation view Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view

Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

Installation view

Photo: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

Installation view Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view

Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view

Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view

Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view

Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Installation view Photo: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

Installation view

Photo: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

Installation view Photo: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

Installation view

Photo: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

Works Exhibited

Richard Artschwager, Mirror/Mirror, 2012 Formica on wood, 29 ¾ × 24 × 4 inches (75.6 × 61 × 10.2 cm), edition of 12Photo: Rob McKeever

Richard Artschwager, Mirror/Mirror, 2012

Formica on wood, 29 ¾ × 24 × 4 inches (75.6 × 61 × 10.2 cm), edition of 12
Photo: Rob McKeever

Dan Colen, The Slim Reaper, 2014 Stainless steel and glass, 101 × 101 × 42 inches (256.5 × 256.5 × 106.7 cm)© Dan Colen

Dan Colen, The Slim Reaper, 2014

Stainless steel and glass, 101 × 101 × 42 inches (256.5 × 256.5 × 106.7 cm)
© Dan Colen

Piero Golia, Clone (Untitled), 2011 Stainless steel, glass, marble, and light, 28 × 9 ⅞ × 9 ⅞ inches (71.1 × 25.1 × 25.1 cm), edition of 5© Piero Golia. Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Piero Golia, Clone (Untitled), 2011

Stainless steel, glass, marble, and light, 28 × 9 ⅞ × 9 ⅞ inches (71.1 × 25.1 × 25.1 cm), edition of 5
© Piero Golia. Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Andreas Gursky, Ocean IV, 2010 Inkjet print, framed: 134 ¼ × 98 ¼ × 2 ½ inches  (341 × 249.6 × 6.4 cm), edition of 6© Andreas Gursky/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014

Andreas Gursky, Ocean IV, 2010

Inkjet print, framed: 134 ¼ × 98 ¼ × 2 ½ inches (341 × 249.6 × 6.4 cm), edition of 6
© Andreas Gursky/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014

Mark Lombardi, Bank of Credit and Commerce International, International Credit and Investment Corporation and First American Bankshares c. 1972–91 aka BCCI-ICIC-FAB (4th version), 1996 Graphite on paper, framed: 52 × 138 inches (132.1 × 350.5 cm)Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Mark Lombardi, Bank of Credit and Commerce International, International Credit and Investment Corporation and First American Bankshares c. 1972–91 aka BCCI-ICIC-FAB (4th version), 1996

Graphite on paper, framed: 52 × 138 inches (132.1 × 350.5 cm)
Photo: Douglas M. Parker Studio

Gianni Motti, HIGGS—Looking for the Anti-Motti, 2005 (still) Video, 5 hr. 50 min., edition of 3

Gianni Motti, HIGGS—Looking for the Anti-Motti, 2005 (still)

Video, 5 hr. 50 min., edition of 3

Kirsten Pieroth, Untitled (Essences), 2014 Jars with liquid from boiled books and personal documents, in 25 parts, dimensions variablePhoto: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

Kirsten Pieroth, Untitled (Essences), 2014

Jars with liquid from boiled books and personal documents, in 25 parts, dimensions variable
Photo: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

Thomas Ruff, 03h 40m / –25°, 1992 Chromogenic print, framed: 102 ⅜ × 74 inches (260 × 188 cm), edition of 2

Thomas Ruff, 03h 40m / –25°, 1992

Chromogenic print, framed: 102 ⅜ × 74 inches (260 × 188 cm), edition of 2

Ingo Swann, Cosmic Egg, 1994 Oil on canvas, 59 × 44 inches (149.9 × 111.8 cm)Photo: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

Ingo Swann, Cosmic Egg, 1994

Oil on canvas, 59 × 44 inches (149.9 × 111.8 cm)
Photo: Benjamin Lee Ritchie Handler

James Turrell, Roden Crater: Complete Site Plan, 2010 Color carbon print on Arches Platine paper, 30 × 38 inches (76.2 × 96.5 cm), edition of 50

James Turrell, Roden Crater: Complete Site Plan, 2010

Color carbon print on Arches Platine paper, 30 × 38 inches (76.2 × 96.5 cm), edition of 50

Dewain Valentine, Column Gray, 1975 Cast polyester resin, 42 ⅞ × 17 ⅜ × 5 ½ inches (109 × 44 × 14 cm)

Dewain Valentine, Column Gray, 1975

Cast polyester resin, 42 ⅞ × 17 ⅜ × 5 ½ inches (109 × 44 × 14 cm)

About

I was no longer in the water but rather I was high above the water and looking down upon it. The sky, that had been so grey and lowering, was iridescent with indescribable beauty. Waves of ecstatic and delicate color vibrated around me and lulled me to a sense of peace beyond comprehensions.
—Robert Kyle Beggs (Case No. 562), Case-Book of Astral Projection, 545–746, by Dr. Robert Crookall, 1972

I think the descriptions of near-death experience, descriptions of light phenomena in the dream, and in waking . . . I dont pretend to have a religious art, but I have to say, it is artists who worked that territory from the very beginning.
—James Turrell, 1999

CLEAR brings together works by twenty-three contemporary artists exploring subjects reflective, transitory, crystalline, or celestial by traversing concepts of clarity sourced from art history, science, and esotericism.

The late 1960s saw the emergence of the California Light and Space movement, tangential to Minimalism, with protagonists such as James Turrell, Larry Bell, and De Wain Valentine. They created works predicated on the extrasensory potential of light by using the space within and around it as an immersive frame, heightening the viewer’s awareness of the mind-body experience. CLEAR imagines a continuation of this narrative, suggesting astral projection—leaving one’s physical body to inhabit an “astral” one—as an endgame. The exhibition explores apertures both material and conceptual, as well as the rich sensibilities that visualize the science and fantasy of aesthetic experience and popular imagination.

Photographic works take the sky as a subject or vantage point, capturing heavenly bodies from light years away. Light and cosmic mystery converge in Lisa Oppenheim’s Heliograms (2013), with their abstract sun-spotting, and the starry firmament of Thomas Ruff’s Sterne (1989–92). Andreas Gursky’s Ocean IV (2010) is a god’s-eye view of the sublime nether region between the Horn of Africa and Antarctica, improbably compressed within a single frame.

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From the Quarterly