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LA Invitational

October 26–December 16, 2017
555 West 24th Street, New York

Installation view with Thomas Houseago, Abstract I (2015) Artwork © Thomas Houseago. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view with Thomas Houseago, Abstract I (2015)

Artwork © Thomas Houseago. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view with Nancy Rubins, Dense Bud (2016) Artwork © Nancy Rubins. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view with Nancy Rubins, Dense Bud (2016)

Artwork © Nancy Rubins. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Mark Grotjahn, © Jonas Wood. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Mark Grotjahn, © Jonas Wood. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Mark Grotjahn, © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Mark Grotjahn, © Sterling Ruby. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view Artwork, left to right: © Sterling Ruby, © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Rob McKeever

Installation view

Artwork, left to right: © Sterling Ruby, © Mary Weatherford. Photo: Rob McKeever

Works Exhibited

Jonas Wood, Landscape Pot 2, 2014 Oil and acrylic on canvas, 120 × 76 inches (304.8 × 193 cm)© Jonas Wood. Photo: Brian Forrest

Jonas Wood, Landscape Pot 2, 2014

Oil and acrylic on canvas, 120 × 76 inches (304.8 × 193 cm)
© Jonas Wood. Photo: Brian Forrest

About

Gagosian is pleased to present LA Invitational, a wide-ranging exhibition of works by Los Angeles–based artists Chris Burden, Frank Gehry, Piero Golia, Mark Grotjahn, Thomas Houseago, Alex Israel, Mike Kelley, Nancy Rubins, Sterling Ruby, Ed Ruscha, Robert Therrien, Jeff Wall, Mary Weatherford, and Jonas Wood. Many works have been made specifically for this exhibition, while others are being shown in New York for the first time.

In the popular imagination, the cultural motor of Los Angeles has always been rooted in Hollywood. The exchange between the movie business and the visual arts, however, has had notable impacts on both worlds—clearly discernible in the works of artists such as Kelley, Ruscha, and Israel. From the 1950s, as the entertainment industry increasingly required industrial, artisanal, and artistic skills such as set painting, animation, modeling, and editing, generations of dedicated visual artists both resisted and participated in Los Angeles’s far-reaching cultural boom during the city’s transformation into one of the world’s most influential industrial, economic, and creative capitals.

The landscape of southern California serves as a catalyst for fantasy, from its modernist architecture to its otherworldly rock formations, trees, coastline, mountains, and hills from which twinkling towns and cities can be viewed in the valleys below. Alex Israel’s Sky Backdrop (2016) depicts Los Angeles’s wide skies in scenographic terms, while Mary Weatherford, showing her first large-scale painting since joining Gagosian, captures the shifting atmosphere of the Pacific coast, evoking the sky and sea in painted layers and glowing, neon light. In Jeff Wall’s Property Line (2015), two surveyors mark a patch of dirt on the outskirts of California City, located about 100 miles outside of Los Angeles, capturing the exact moment at which nature is transformed into property.

Mark Grotjahn’s Untitled (Turkish Forest V Face 43.94) (2012) is the largest example of his iconic “face paintings” to date. The Turkish Forest is a single work comprising eleven paintings; nine were shown together in 2014 at the Punta della Dogana in Venice. Evolving out of Grotjahn’s Butterfly series, Untitled (Turkish Forest V Face 43.94) features a dichromatic scheme of red and blue oil paint, applied layer by layer with a brush and a palette knife, the colors building upon each other to an almost sculptural effect.

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Mary Weatherford, Orion’s Belt, 2016, Flashe and neon on linen.

Mary Weatherford: Train Yards

Mary Weatherford speaks to Laura Hoptman about her new paintings, the Train Yard series. Begun in 2016, this body of work evokes the sights and sounds of railroads and night skies. The series will be shown for the first time in late 2020, in an exhibition at Gagosian, London.

Josh Kline, Skittles, 2014, commercial fridge, light box, and blended liquids in bottles, 86 ½ × 127 ½ × 41 inches (219.7 × 323.9 × 104.1 cm) © Josh Kline. Photo:  © Timothy Schenck

Laws of Motion

Catalyzed by Laws of Motion—a group exhibition, curated by Sam Orlofsky, pairing artworks from the 1980s on by Jeff Koons, Cady Noland, Rosemarie Trockel, and Jeff Wall with contemporary sculptures by Josh Kline and Anicka Yi—Wyatt Allgeier discusses the convergences and divergences in these artists’ practices with an eye to the economic worlds from which they spring.

The Nature of Mark Grotjahn

The Nature of Mark Grotjahn

Michael Auping writes about the origins of Mark Grotjahn’s Capri paintings and their relationship with nature and landscape.

Mark Grotjahn: Capri

Mark Grotjahn: Capri

Mark Grotjahn speaks to Sam Orlofsky about the stories and processes behind his Capri series, on the occasion of his exhibition New Capri, Capri, Free Capri in New York.

Robert Therrien: The Causal Link to the (Un)Real

Robert Therrien: The Causal Link to the (Un)Real

In honor of the extraordinary life of Robert Therrien (1947–2019), Aimee Gabbard writes about her time with the artist and explores his lifelong interest in photography.

Charlotte Perriand in her studio on place Saint-Sulpice, Paris, 1928. The hands holding a plate halolike behind her head are Le Corbusier’s.

The New World of Charlotte Perriand

Inspired by a visit to the Fondation Louis Vuitton’s exhibition Charlotte Perriand: Inventing a New World, William Middleton explores the life of this modernist pioneer and her impact on the worlds of design, art, and architecture.